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All (21)

All (21) (0 to 10 of 21 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100009
    Description:

    This study examines the impact of social capital and ethnocultural characteristics on the evolution of employment income of a cohort of immigrants who arrived in Canada in 2001, based on two linked datasets: the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC) and the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB). The study examines the employment income of this cohort in their first 15 years in Canada (i.e., from 2002 to 2016).

    Release date: 2019-06-19

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201917020483
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-28-0001201800100013
    Description:

    This Just the Facts on asylum claimants provides more details on the number of asylum claimants in Canada, their characteristics and their outcomes after arrival.

    Release date: 2019-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201900400001
    Description:

    This study, based on the linked Canadian Community Health Survey-Longitudinal Immigration database, offers a first look at the healthy immigrant effect among selected immigrants arriving under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act by comparing these results with those for their Canadian-born counterparts.

    Release date: 2019-04-17

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201907020165
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019007
    Description:

    Canada welcomed over 830,000 refugees from the 1980s to 2000s. However, their economic outcomes, especially the variation among major refugee groups, have not been examined comprehensively. Using the Longitudinal Immigration Database, this paper examines the labour market outcomes of refugees from 13 source countries with large inflows to Canada over the 1980-to-2009 period. The analysis first compares employment rates and earnings among refugees from the 13 source countries. It further compares each refugee group with economic-class and family-class immigrants who arrived during the same period.

    Release date: 2019-03-11

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201904319135
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-02-12

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20183446423
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2018-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018411
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    Immigrants tend to reside disproportionately in larger Canadian cities, which may challenge their absorptive capacity. This study uses the linked Longitudinal Immigration Database and T1 Family File to examine the initial location and onward migration decisions of immigrants who are economic principal applicants (EPAs) and who have landed since the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act was passed. The main objective of the study is to identify the factors associated with initially residing and remaining in Canada’s three largest gateway cities: Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver (referred to as MTV).

    Release date: 2018-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-657-X2018001
    Description:

    This study draws on data from the Longitudinal Immigration Database to examine participation in Canadian post-secondary education (PSE) among adult immigrants in the 2002-2005 landing cohort, with an explicit focus on resettled refugees. The study describes the demographic characteristics of participants, the qualities of participation, and the economic returns on investment in Canadian PSE. It also employs multivariate regression analysis to further examine the effects of participation in Canadian training on employment incidence and the income of those employed, while controlling for other factors associated with successful economic integration.

    Release date: 2018-11-14
Stats in brief (11)

Stats in brief (11) (0 to 10 of 11 results)

Articles and reports (10)

Articles and reports (10) ((10 results))

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100009
    Description:

    This study examines the impact of social capital and ethnocultural characteristics on the evolution of employment income of a cohort of immigrants who arrived in Canada in 2001, based on two linked datasets: the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC) and the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB). The study examines the employment income of this cohort in their first 15 years in Canada (i.e., from 2002 to 2016).

    Release date: 2019-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-28-0001201800100013
    Description:

    This Just the Facts on asylum claimants provides more details on the number of asylum claimants in Canada, their characteristics and their outcomes after arrival.

    Release date: 2019-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201900400001
    Description:

    This study, based on the linked Canadian Community Health Survey-Longitudinal Immigration database, offers a first look at the healthy immigrant effect among selected immigrants arriving under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act by comparing these results with those for their Canadian-born counterparts.

    Release date: 2019-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019007
    Description:

    Canada welcomed over 830,000 refugees from the 1980s to 2000s. However, their economic outcomes, especially the variation among major refugee groups, have not been examined comprehensively. Using the Longitudinal Immigration Database, this paper examines the labour market outcomes of refugees from 13 source countries with large inflows to Canada over the 1980-to-2009 period. The analysis first compares employment rates and earnings among refugees from the 13 source countries. It further compares each refugee group with economic-class and family-class immigrants who arrived during the same period.

    Release date: 2019-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018411
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    Immigrants tend to reside disproportionately in larger Canadian cities, which may challenge their absorptive capacity. This study uses the linked Longitudinal Immigration Database and T1 Family File to examine the initial location and onward migration decisions of immigrants who are economic principal applicants (EPAs) and who have landed since the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act was passed. The main objective of the study is to identify the factors associated with initially residing and remaining in Canada’s three largest gateway cities: Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver (referred to as MTV).

    Release date: 2018-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-657-X2018001
    Description:

    This study draws on data from the Longitudinal Immigration Database to examine participation in Canadian post-secondary education (PSE) among adult immigrants in the 2002-2005 landing cohort, with an explicit focus on resettled refugees. The study describes the demographic characteristics of participants, the qualities of participation, and the economic returns on investment in Canadian PSE. It also employs multivariate regression analysis to further examine the effects of participation in Canadian training on employment incidence and the income of those employed, while controlling for other factors associated with successful economic integration.

    Release date: 2018-11-14

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201800700002
    Description:

    This study provides new evidence on TB-related hospitalizations among new immigrants to Canada. It uses a unique linked data file (2000-to-2013 Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB) linked to the Canadian Institute for Health Information's Discharge Abstract Database (DAD) from 2001/2002 to 2013/2014) that brings together information from immigrant landing records and hospital data for a maximum of 13 years to identify a TB-related hospital event after landing. Specifically, this paper provides a profile of the timing of TB-related acute care hospitalization, starting from the time of landing among immigrants who officially landed in Canada from 2000 to 2013, as well as an estimation of the burden of TB hospital care in Canada incurred by these recent immigrants relative to the total Canadian population.

    Release date: 2018-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411593
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Following an economic shock affecting a city or region, many residents - particularly those who have just lost their jobs - will likely look to migrate to another region to improve their economic situation. This study uses data from the 1997 to 2008 Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD) to evaluate the impact of regional economic shocks on the migration of residents. In particular, it examines the extent to which a deterioration in the relative economic position of a region and a decrease in personal income are linked to higher probabilities of migration.

    Release date: 2011-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100311505
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Even though immigrants who arrived in Canada in recent decades are more educated than other Canadians, they enrol in postsecondary educational institutions in proportionally greater numbers after their arrival. This article examines a cohort of immigrants who were between 25 and 44 years of age when they arrived in Canada in 1998 and 1999. Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD), changes in immigrants' employment income over an eight-year period are studied based on whether these individuals pursued postsecondary education in Canada.

    Release date: 2011-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810113201
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Where immigrants choose to settle appears to have an impact on their economic integration. It is much faster outside the large urban centres. In the larger urban centres, immigrants face a large initial income disadvantage and subsequent increases are not enough for them to achieve parity with other Canadians. Better economic integration of immigrants outside the larger urban centres is found even after taking into consideration differences in education, ability in an official language, admission class and country of origin.

    Release date: 2008-03-18
Journals and periodicals (0)

Journals and periodicals (0) (0 results)

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