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All (5)

All (5) ((5 results))

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201701254891
    Description:

    The objective of this analysis is to determine if Métis are more likely than non-Aboriginal people to be hospitalized for ambulatory care sensitive conditions and whether differences persist after adjustment for socioeconomic and geographic factors.

    Release date: 2017-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201700954855
    Description:

    This analysis classifies people aged 50 or older as high hospital users, non-high users, or not hospitalized and compares the socioeconomic characteristics, health outcomes, health behaviours, and hospital experiences of the three groups.

    Release date: 2017-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-622-X2010005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Health disparities between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations in Canada, including differences in life expectancies, have clearly been established. A variety of sources is currently used to measure and document these disparities, yet information gaps persist. Because of limited coverage and sample sizes, reliable health information that reflects the diversity in Canada's Aboriginal population is not always available. By assigning 2001 Census data for small geographical areas to hospital discharge records from the 2001/2002 Hospital Morbidity Database, this report provides estimates of morbidity serious enough to require hospitalization. Acute-care hospitalizations of people living in areas with a relatively high percentage of Aboriginal residents are compared with hospitalizations of residents of areas where the percentage of Aboriginal residents is low. Variations by predominant Aboriginal identity in these areas - First Nations, Métis and Inuit populations -are also explored. Factors that potentially underlie differences in hospitalization rates between residents of high- and low-Aboriginal areas are determined by adjusting for urban/rural residence and area socio-economic characteristics.

    Release date: 2010-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040017038
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this Health Reports article, a 20-year trend in the average length of hospital stay for breast cancer is traced, using data from the Hospital Morbitiy Database and the Person-oriented Information Database. Reasons for the shorter length of stay are examined and its impact on outcomes is discussed.

    Release date: 2004-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20030046975
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Since the early 1980s, the overall hospitalization rate in Canada has fallen sharply, but the rate for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been stable. To some degree, this stability during an era of decline reflects the high rate of readmission among IBD patients, with more than 20% having at least two hospital stays during the course of a year.

    Release date: 2004-07-21
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Articles and reports (5)

Articles and reports (5) ((5 results))

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201701254891
    Description:

    The objective of this analysis is to determine if Métis are more likely than non-Aboriginal people to be hospitalized for ambulatory care sensitive conditions and whether differences persist after adjustment for socioeconomic and geographic factors.

    Release date: 2017-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201700954855
    Description:

    This analysis classifies people aged 50 or older as high hospital users, non-high users, or not hospitalized and compares the socioeconomic characteristics, health outcomes, health behaviours, and hospital experiences of the three groups.

    Release date: 2017-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-622-X2010005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Health disparities between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations in Canada, including differences in life expectancies, have clearly been established. A variety of sources is currently used to measure and document these disparities, yet information gaps persist. Because of limited coverage and sample sizes, reliable health information that reflects the diversity in Canada's Aboriginal population is not always available. By assigning 2001 Census data for small geographical areas to hospital discharge records from the 2001/2002 Hospital Morbidity Database, this report provides estimates of morbidity serious enough to require hospitalization. Acute-care hospitalizations of people living in areas with a relatively high percentage of Aboriginal residents are compared with hospitalizations of residents of areas where the percentage of Aboriginal residents is low. Variations by predominant Aboriginal identity in these areas - First Nations, Métis and Inuit populations -are also explored. Factors that potentially underlie differences in hospitalization rates between residents of high- and low-Aboriginal areas are determined by adjusting for urban/rural residence and area socio-economic characteristics.

    Release date: 2010-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040017038
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this Health Reports article, a 20-year trend in the average length of hospital stay for breast cancer is traced, using data from the Hospital Morbitiy Database and the Person-oriented Information Database. Reasons for the shorter length of stay are examined and its impact on outcomes is discussed.

    Release date: 2004-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20030046975
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Since the early 1980s, the overall hospitalization rate in Canada has fallen sharply, but the rate for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been stable. To some degree, this stability during an era of decline reflects the high rate of readmission among IBD patients, with more than 20% having at least two hospital stays during the course of a year.

    Release date: 2004-07-21
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