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All (16) (0 to 10 of 16 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201900100001
    Description:

    An increasing number of consumer laser products are available to Canadians, many being purchased from online retailers. Of particular concern are high-powered, handheld laser devices. This study was conducted to assess the impact of this influx of laser products on the number of laser-associated injuries in Canada. Data are from the rapid response component of the 2014 Canadian Community Health Survey which collected data from 19,765 Canadians on the prevalence of laser product exposure and usage, the type of laser product used, and the incidence of eye or skin injuries.

    Release date: 2019-01-16

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201700114696
    Description:

    In 2014, the Canadian Community Health Survey collected data on tanning equipment use, including frequency of use, reasons for use, injury, and the efficacy of labelling and safety information. Based on these data, this analysis presents prevalence estimates of indoor tanning and associated injury.

    Release date: 2017-01-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015047
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series presents an overview of interprovincial paid employment over the 2002-to-2011 period. Interprovincial workers are individuals who maintain a permanent residence in a given province or territory but work in another. The results are based on Statistics Canada’s Canadian Employer-Employee Dynamics Database and pertain to employees aged 18 or older who earned at least $1,000 in 2002 dollars.

    Release date: 2015-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014361
    Description:

    In Canada, the selection of economic immigrants throughout the 1990s and 2000s was based largely on the human capital model of immigration. This model posits that selecting immigrants with high levels of human capital is particularly advantageous in the long run. It is argued that higher educational levels allow immigrants to both bring the skills needed in a "knowledge-based economy" and, perhaps more importantly, better adjust to both cyclical and structural changes in the labour market than immigrants with lower educational levels.

    This paper examines the trends in the earnings advantage that more highly educated immigrants hold over less educated immigrants by immigration class. The focus is on three questions. First, did the well-documented decline in entry earnings observed over the last quarter-century vary by immigrant educational level and by admission class? Second, have there been significant shifts across recent cohorts in the economic advantage that more highly educated immigrants hold over their less educated counterparts, both at entry and in the longer run? Third, and most importantly, does the relative earnings advantage of more highly educated immigrants change with time spent in Canada, that is, in the longer run?

    Release date: 2014-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013348
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study documents how hiring rates, separation rates, and worker reallocation rates evolved from the late 1970s to the late 2000s. It also examines how the pace of labour reallocation varied across industries, firm sizes, provinces, age groups, and education levels during the 2000s.

    Release date: 2013-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011339
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines how the risk of job loss and the short-term earnings losses of laid-off workers evolved between the late 1970s and the mid-2000s.

    Release date: 2011-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201000211384
    Description:

    The current economic downturn in the US could challenge costly strategies in survey operations. In the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), ending the monthly data collection at 31 days could be a less costly alternative. However, this could potentially exclude a portion of interviews completed after 31 days (late responders) whose respondent characteristics could be different in many respects from those who completed the survey within 31 days (early responders). We examined whether there are differences between the early and late responders in demographics, health-care coverage, general health status, health risk behaviors, and chronic disease conditions or illnesses. We used 2007 BRFSS data, where a representative sample of the noninstitutionalized adult U.S. population was selected using a random digit dialing method. Late responders were significantly more likely to be male; to report race/ethnicity as Hispanic; to have annual income higher than $50,000; to be younger than 45 years of age; to have less than high school education; to have health-care coverage; to be significantly more likely to report good health; and to be significantly less likely to report hypertension, diabetes, or being obese. The observed differences between early and late responders on survey estimates may hardly influence national and state-level estimates. As the proportion of late responders may increase in the future, its impact on surveillance estimates should be examined before excluding from the analysis. Analysis on late responders only should combine several years of data to produce reliable estimates.

    Release date: 2010-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201000111118
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article describes the distribution of blood pressure in the Canadian adult population, and provides estimates of the prevalence of hypertension by sex and age group. Levels of hypertension awareness, treatment and control are also reported.

    Release date: 2010-02-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2009072
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This report provides new and unique empirical evidence on postsecondary education pathways in Atlantic Canada based on the data from the Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS). This study covers postsecondary students in public institutions at all levels of study - college, bachelor's, master's, Ph.D. and first professional degrees - with the emphasis on college and bachelor's students. The focus is on students who start new programs over the period of study, years 2001 through to 2004, and then observing who, in each year of their studies, graduates, continues in the same program, switches programs or leaves postsecondary education without graduating. The number of students who leave and then return to postsecondary studies and the number of students who graduate from a program and then continue in their studies are also identified. Students in this study can be tracked longitudinally as they move both within and across all institutions in the Atlantic.

    The research file used for this study was created by Statistics Canada using PSIS data from the Atlantic region. One of the key objectives of the PSIS is to provide information that will enable researchers to perform studies of student mobility, pathways and their relationship to education and labour market outcomes. PSIS is designed to hold a complete inventory of all Canadian postsecondary institutions and the programs and courses they offer, as well as demographic, program and course information for each student registered at these institutions. Atlantic Canada has participated in PSIS since the inception of PSIS and therefore was well positioned to take advantage of a longitudinal study using PSIS.

    The research file includes one longitudinal record for each postsecondary student who studied in Atlantic Canada at some point during the years 2001 through to 2004. The term "longitudinal" means that, as the student progresses through the postsecondary system, the PSIS record will provide a cumulative history of their postsecondary activity. It is the longitudinal nature of the database that allows for statistical studies of student mobility, pathways and their relationship to education and labour market outcomes. The research file contains 337,000 student records.

    Release date: 2009-02-12

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200800210758
    Description:

    We propose a method for estimating the variance of estimators of changes over time, a method that takes account of all the components of these estimators: the sampling design, treatment of non-response, treatment of large companies, correlation of non-response from one wave to another, the effect of using a panel, robustification, and calibration using a ratio estimator. This method, which serves to determine the confidence intervals of changes over time, is then applied to the Swiss survey of value added.

    Release date: 2008-12-23
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Articles and reports (15)

Articles and reports (15) (0 to 10 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201900100001
    Description:

    An increasing number of consumer laser products are available to Canadians, many being purchased from online retailers. Of particular concern are high-powered, handheld laser devices. This study was conducted to assess the impact of this influx of laser products on the number of laser-associated injuries in Canada. Data are from the rapid response component of the 2014 Canadian Community Health Survey which collected data from 19,765 Canadians on the prevalence of laser product exposure and usage, the type of laser product used, and the incidence of eye or skin injuries.

    Release date: 2019-01-16

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201700114696
    Description:

    In 2014, the Canadian Community Health Survey collected data on tanning equipment use, including frequency of use, reasons for use, injury, and the efficacy of labelling and safety information. Based on these data, this analysis presents prevalence estimates of indoor tanning and associated injury.

    Release date: 2017-01-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015047
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series presents an overview of interprovincial paid employment over the 2002-to-2011 period. Interprovincial workers are individuals who maintain a permanent residence in a given province or territory but work in another. The results are based on Statistics Canada’s Canadian Employer-Employee Dynamics Database and pertain to employees aged 18 or older who earned at least $1,000 in 2002 dollars.

    Release date: 2015-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014361
    Description:

    In Canada, the selection of economic immigrants throughout the 1990s and 2000s was based largely on the human capital model of immigration. This model posits that selecting immigrants with high levels of human capital is particularly advantageous in the long run. It is argued that higher educational levels allow immigrants to both bring the skills needed in a "knowledge-based economy" and, perhaps more importantly, better adjust to both cyclical and structural changes in the labour market than immigrants with lower educational levels.

    This paper examines the trends in the earnings advantage that more highly educated immigrants hold over less educated immigrants by immigration class. The focus is on three questions. First, did the well-documented decline in entry earnings observed over the last quarter-century vary by immigrant educational level and by admission class? Second, have there been significant shifts across recent cohorts in the economic advantage that more highly educated immigrants hold over their less educated counterparts, both at entry and in the longer run? Third, and most importantly, does the relative earnings advantage of more highly educated immigrants change with time spent in Canada, that is, in the longer run?

    Release date: 2014-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013348
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study documents how hiring rates, separation rates, and worker reallocation rates evolved from the late 1970s to the late 2000s. It also examines how the pace of labour reallocation varied across industries, firm sizes, provinces, age groups, and education levels during the 2000s.

    Release date: 2013-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011339
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines how the risk of job loss and the short-term earnings losses of laid-off workers evolved between the late 1970s and the mid-2000s.

    Release date: 2011-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201000211384
    Description:

    The current economic downturn in the US could challenge costly strategies in survey operations. In the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), ending the monthly data collection at 31 days could be a less costly alternative. However, this could potentially exclude a portion of interviews completed after 31 days (late responders) whose respondent characteristics could be different in many respects from those who completed the survey within 31 days (early responders). We examined whether there are differences between the early and late responders in demographics, health-care coverage, general health status, health risk behaviors, and chronic disease conditions or illnesses. We used 2007 BRFSS data, where a representative sample of the noninstitutionalized adult U.S. population was selected using a random digit dialing method. Late responders were significantly more likely to be male; to report race/ethnicity as Hispanic; to have annual income higher than $50,000; to be younger than 45 years of age; to have less than high school education; to have health-care coverage; to be significantly more likely to report good health; and to be significantly less likely to report hypertension, diabetes, or being obese. The observed differences between early and late responders on survey estimates may hardly influence national and state-level estimates. As the proportion of late responders may increase in the future, its impact on surveillance estimates should be examined before excluding from the analysis. Analysis on late responders only should combine several years of data to produce reliable estimates.

    Release date: 2010-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201000111118
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article describes the distribution of blood pressure in the Canadian adult population, and provides estimates of the prevalence of hypertension by sex and age group. Levels of hypertension awareness, treatment and control are also reported.

    Release date: 2010-02-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2009072
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This report provides new and unique empirical evidence on postsecondary education pathways in Atlantic Canada based on the data from the Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS). This study covers postsecondary students in public institutions at all levels of study - college, bachelor's, master's, Ph.D. and first professional degrees - with the emphasis on college and bachelor's students. The focus is on students who start new programs over the period of study, years 2001 through to 2004, and then observing who, in each year of their studies, graduates, continues in the same program, switches programs or leaves postsecondary education without graduating. The number of students who leave and then return to postsecondary studies and the number of students who graduate from a program and then continue in their studies are also identified. Students in this study can be tracked longitudinally as they move both within and across all institutions in the Atlantic.

    The research file used for this study was created by Statistics Canada using PSIS data from the Atlantic region. One of the key objectives of the PSIS is to provide information that will enable researchers to perform studies of student mobility, pathways and their relationship to education and labour market outcomes. PSIS is designed to hold a complete inventory of all Canadian postsecondary institutions and the programs and courses they offer, as well as demographic, program and course information for each student registered at these institutions. Atlantic Canada has participated in PSIS since the inception of PSIS and therefore was well positioned to take advantage of a longitudinal study using PSIS.

    The research file includes one longitudinal record for each postsecondary student who studied in Atlantic Canada at some point during the years 2001 through to 2004. The term "longitudinal" means that, as the student progresses through the postsecondary system, the PSIS record will provide a cumulative history of their postsecondary activity. It is the longitudinal nature of the database that allows for statistical studies of student mobility, pathways and their relationship to education and labour market outcomes. The research file contains 337,000 student records.

    Release date: 2009-02-12

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200800210758
    Description:

    We propose a method for estimating the variance of estimators of changes over time, a method that takes account of all the components of these estimators: the sampling design, treatment of non-response, treatment of large companies, correlation of non-response from one wave to another, the effect of using a panel, robustification, and calibration using a ratio estimator. This method, which serves to determine the confidence intervals of changes over time, is then applied to the Swiss survey of value added.

    Release date: 2008-12-23
Journals and periodicals (1)

Journals and periodicals (1) ((1 result))

  • Journals and periodicals: 85F0031X
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area, Census agglomeration
    Description:

    Data on Aboriginal status contained in this report are based on self-reported (Census) and/or observational (crime) data. They provide information on the nature and extent of Aboriginal involvement in urban, rural and reserve crime as well as the socio-demographic profile of the population of Saskatchewan.

    Based on the 1996 Census data, the Aboriginal population in Saskatchewan tend to be younger, have lower educational levels, higher unemployment rates, and substantially lower incomes than the non-Aboriginal population. Crime rates on reserves were two times higher than rates in rural or urban areas of the province. For violent offences, the rate was almost five times higher on-reserve than in urban or rural areas.

    In all three areas (reserves, urban and rural areas), a larger proportion of adults than youth was accused of a violent offence or an "other" Criminal Code offence. In contrast, youth were more often accused of a property offence than any other offence type. In urban areas, there is an over-representation of Aboriginal persons involved in the criminal justice system. In 1997, more than one-half (52%) of those accused in Prince Albert, Regina and Saskatoon were Aboriginal compared to their 9% proportion in the population of these cities.

    A substantial difference in the male-female ratio of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal accused was found. Although the majority of all those accused were male, there was a greater proportion of Aboriginal female than non-Aboriginal female accused. Aboriginal accused tended to be younger than non-Aboriginal accused. Almost one-third (31%) of Aboriginal accused were aged 12 to 17 years of age compared to 23% of non-Aboriginal accused.

    In the two cities where victim data were available (Regina and Prince Albert), there was a greater proportion of Aboriginal than non-Aboriginal victims of violent crime compared to their proportion in the overall population of these cities. In 1997, 42% of victims in Prince Albert and Regina were Aboriginal, compared to their 10% proportion in the population of these cities.

    Release date: 2000-01-31
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