Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (23)

All (23) (0 to 10 of 23 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202100900001
    Description:

    In light of increasing Canadian immigration levels, an updated analysis of hospitalization patterns among immigrants to Canada, relative to the Canadian-born population, is needed to inform health care system policy and planning. Using immigrant landing administrative data linked to health care data, this descriptive study aims to examine hospitalization rates and leading causes of hospitalization, including mental health in immigrants and the Canadian-born population, stratified by sex and selected immigration characteristics.

    Release date: 2021-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202100800002
    Description:

    With data from the 2019 Canadian Community Health Survey, this study assessed the use of and exposure to handheld laser devices by Canadians and the potential associated health risks. In addition to the prevalence of handheld laser exposure or use, the frequency and type of injury sustained, and whether the injury was the result of personal use or someone else's use, the study also determined the type of handheld laser device being used and where the device was obtained.

    Release date: 2021-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2021004
    Description:

    International migration has become increasingly fluid and is viewed decreasingly as a one-time, permanent movement from a source country to a destination country. Immigrant-receiving countries often point to long-term economic- and population-related goals as motivations for permanent immigration programs, making immigrants’ presence and absence patterns of increasing policy interest. This article explores two methodological issues related to measuring immigrants’ potential presence in Canada. The first is the use of auxiliary administrative data sources as a means to supplement the T1 Income Tax Return file, which—to date—has been one of the key data sources used to estimate emigration among Canadian immigrants. The second is the evaluation of the sensitivity of emigration estimates to the definition of immigrant disappearance and reappearance in administrative data.

    Release date: 2021-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100200002
    Description:

    This Insights article examines the degree to which workers who lost their job in 2009 started a business, changed regions, went back to school or began a registered apprenticeship in 2010, the year following job loss. The analysis combines the 2001 Census of Population with Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker File and Registered Apprenticeship Information System.

    Release date: 2021-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020006
    Description:

    The Canadian labour market has seen significant changes since the late 1970s. This article examines the evolution of layoff rates in Canada from 1978 to 2016, the last year for which data on permanent layoffs are currently available. The analysis uses Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker File and focuses on employees aged 25 to 64.

    Release date: 2020-06-23

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100030
    Description:

    It is too early to know how many Canadian workers will lose their job, i.e. will be permanently laid-off, as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and what will happen to them financially after job loss. Yet a number of stylized facts emerge from the past. While these facts do not necessarily allow accurate predictions of the impact of the pandemic on job displacement, they provide a long-term perspective from which forthcoming labour market developments can be assessed. The goal of this article is to highlight these facts.

    Release date: 2020-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201900100001
    Description:

    An increasing number of consumer laser products are available to Canadians, many being purchased from online retailers. Of particular concern are high-powered, handheld laser devices. This study was conducted to assess the impact of this influx of laser products on the number of laser-associated injuries in Canada. Data are from the rapid response component of the 2014 Canadian Community Health Survey which collected data from 19,765 Canadians on the prevalence of laser product exposure and usage, the type of laser product used, and the incidence of eye or skin injuries.

    Release date: 2019-01-16

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201700114696
    Description:

    In 2014, the Canadian Community Health Survey collected data on tanning equipment use, including frequency of use, reasons for use, injury, and the efficacy of labelling and safety information. Based on these data, this analysis presents prevalence estimates of indoor tanning and associated injury.

    Release date: 2017-01-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015047
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series presents an overview of interprovincial paid employment over the 2002-to-2011 period. Interprovincial workers are individuals who maintain a permanent residence in a given province or territory but work in another. The results are based on Statistics Canada’s Canadian Employer-Employee Dynamics Database and pertain to employees aged 18 or older who earned at least $1,000 in 2002 dollars.

    Release date: 2015-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014361
    Description:

    In Canada, the selection of economic immigrants throughout the 1990s and 2000s was based largely on the human capital model of immigration. This model posits that selecting immigrants with high levels of human capital is particularly advantageous in the long run. It is argued that higher educational levels allow immigrants to both bring the skills needed in a "knowledge-based economy" and, perhaps more importantly, better adjust to both cyclical and structural changes in the labour market than immigrants with lower educational levels.

    This paper examines the trends in the earnings advantage that more highly educated immigrants hold over less educated immigrants by immigration class. The focus is on three questions. First, did the well-documented decline in entry earnings observed over the last quarter-century vary by immigrant educational level and by admission class? Second, have there been significant shifts across recent cohorts in the economic advantage that more highly educated immigrants hold over their less educated counterparts, both at entry and in the longer run? Third, and most importantly, does the relative earnings advantage of more highly educated immigrants change with time spent in Canada, that is, in the longer run?

    Release date: 2014-05-29
Stats in brief (1)

Stats in brief (1) ((1 result))

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100030
    Description:

    It is too early to know how many Canadian workers will lose their job, i.e. will be permanently laid-off, as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and what will happen to them financially after job loss. Yet a number of stylized facts emerge from the past. While these facts do not necessarily allow accurate predictions of the impact of the pandemic on job displacement, they provide a long-term perspective from which forthcoming labour market developments can be assessed. The goal of this article is to highlight these facts.

    Release date: 2020-06-10
Articles and reports (21)

Articles and reports (21) (0 to 10 of 21 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202100900001
    Description:

    In light of increasing Canadian immigration levels, an updated analysis of hospitalization patterns among immigrants to Canada, relative to the Canadian-born population, is needed to inform health care system policy and planning. Using immigrant landing administrative data linked to health care data, this descriptive study aims to examine hospitalization rates and leading causes of hospitalization, including mental health in immigrants and the Canadian-born population, stratified by sex and selected immigration characteristics.

    Release date: 2021-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202100800002
    Description:

    With data from the 2019 Canadian Community Health Survey, this study assessed the use of and exposure to handheld laser devices by Canadians and the potential associated health risks. In addition to the prevalence of handheld laser exposure or use, the frequency and type of injury sustained, and whether the injury was the result of personal use or someone else's use, the study also determined the type of handheld laser device being used and where the device was obtained.

    Release date: 2021-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2021004
    Description:

    International migration has become increasingly fluid and is viewed decreasingly as a one-time, permanent movement from a source country to a destination country. Immigrant-receiving countries often point to long-term economic- and population-related goals as motivations for permanent immigration programs, making immigrants’ presence and absence patterns of increasing policy interest. This article explores two methodological issues related to measuring immigrants’ potential presence in Canada. The first is the use of auxiliary administrative data sources as a means to supplement the T1 Income Tax Return file, which—to date—has been one of the key data sources used to estimate emigration among Canadian immigrants. The second is the evaluation of the sensitivity of emigration estimates to the definition of immigrant disappearance and reappearance in administrative data.

    Release date: 2021-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100200002
    Description:

    This Insights article examines the degree to which workers who lost their job in 2009 started a business, changed regions, went back to school or began a registered apprenticeship in 2010, the year following job loss. The analysis combines the 2001 Census of Population with Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker File and Registered Apprenticeship Information System.

    Release date: 2021-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020006
    Description:

    The Canadian labour market has seen significant changes since the late 1970s. This article examines the evolution of layoff rates in Canada from 1978 to 2016, the last year for which data on permanent layoffs are currently available. The analysis uses Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker File and focuses on employees aged 25 to 64.

    Release date: 2020-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201900100001
    Description:

    An increasing number of consumer laser products are available to Canadians, many being purchased from online retailers. Of particular concern are high-powered, handheld laser devices. This study was conducted to assess the impact of this influx of laser products on the number of laser-associated injuries in Canada. Data are from the rapid response component of the 2014 Canadian Community Health Survey which collected data from 19,765 Canadians on the prevalence of laser product exposure and usage, the type of laser product used, and the incidence of eye or skin injuries.

    Release date: 2019-01-16

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201700114696
    Description:

    In 2014, the Canadian Community Health Survey collected data on tanning equipment use, including frequency of use, reasons for use, injury, and the efficacy of labelling and safety information. Based on these data, this analysis presents prevalence estimates of indoor tanning and associated injury.

    Release date: 2017-01-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015047
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series presents an overview of interprovincial paid employment over the 2002-to-2011 period. Interprovincial workers are individuals who maintain a permanent residence in a given province or territory but work in another. The results are based on Statistics Canada’s Canadian Employer-Employee Dynamics Database and pertain to employees aged 18 or older who earned at least $1,000 in 2002 dollars.

    Release date: 2015-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014361
    Description:

    In Canada, the selection of economic immigrants throughout the 1990s and 2000s was based largely on the human capital model of immigration. This model posits that selecting immigrants with high levels of human capital is particularly advantageous in the long run. It is argued that higher educational levels allow immigrants to both bring the skills needed in a "knowledge-based economy" and, perhaps more importantly, better adjust to both cyclical and structural changes in the labour market than immigrants with lower educational levels.

    This paper examines the trends in the earnings advantage that more highly educated immigrants hold over less educated immigrants by immigration class. The focus is on three questions. First, did the well-documented decline in entry earnings observed over the last quarter-century vary by immigrant educational level and by admission class? Second, have there been significant shifts across recent cohorts in the economic advantage that more highly educated immigrants hold over their less educated counterparts, both at entry and in the longer run? Third, and most importantly, does the relative earnings advantage of more highly educated immigrants change with time spent in Canada, that is, in the longer run?

    Release date: 2014-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013348
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study documents how hiring rates, separation rates, and worker reallocation rates evolved from the late 1970s to the late 2000s. It also examines how the pace of labour reallocation varied across industries, firm sizes, provinces, age groups, and education levels during the 2000s.

    Release date: 2013-03-01
Journals and periodicals (1)

Journals and periodicals (1) ((1 result))

  • Journals and periodicals: 85F0031X
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area, Census agglomeration
    Description:

    Data on Aboriginal status contained in this report are based on self-reported (Census) and/or observational (crime) data. They provide information on the nature and extent of Aboriginal involvement in urban, rural and reserve crime as well as the socio-demographic profile of the population of Saskatchewan.

    Based on the 1996 Census data, the Aboriginal population in Saskatchewan tend to be younger, have lower educational levels, higher unemployment rates, and substantially lower incomes than the non-Aboriginal population. Crime rates on reserves were two times higher than rates in rural or urban areas of the province. For violent offences, the rate was almost five times higher on-reserve than in urban or rural areas.

    In all three areas (reserves, urban and rural areas), a larger proportion of adults than youth was accused of a violent offence or an "other" Criminal Code offence. In contrast, youth were more often accused of a property offence than any other offence type. In urban areas, there is an over-representation of Aboriginal persons involved in the criminal justice system. In 1997, more than one-half (52%) of those accused in Prince Albert, Regina and Saskatoon were Aboriginal compared to their 9% proportion in the population of these cities.

    A substantial difference in the male-female ratio of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal accused was found. Although the majority of all those accused were male, there was a greater proportion of Aboriginal female than non-Aboriginal female accused. Aboriginal accused tended to be younger than non-Aboriginal accused. Almost one-third (31%) of Aboriginal accused were aged 12 to 17 years of age compared to 23% of non-Aboriginal accused.

    In the two cities where victim data were available (Regina and Prince Albert), there was a greater proportion of Aboriginal than non-Aboriginal victims of violent crime compared to their proportion in the overall population of these cities. In 1997, 42% of victims in Prince Albert and Regina were Aboriginal, compared to their 10% proportion in the population of these cities.

    Release date: 2000-01-31
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