Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (30)

All (30) (0 to 10 of 30 results)

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200600003
    Description:

    Every year, thousands of Canadian workers lose their job. The opportunities for coping with job loss through postsecondary education (PSE) transitions might be unequally distributed across Canadian families, perhaps even more so than across Canadian workers. Using data from Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker File (LWF), the T1 Family File (T1FF), the Post-Secondary Information System (PSIS), and the 2006 Census of Population, this study quantifies the degree to which the likelihood of entering PSE or a new field of study after job loss varies, all else equal, across types of family units and, among dual-earner couples, with the earnings or the risk of job loss of the spouse.

    Release date: 2022-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202200600003
    Description:

    Canadian immigrants from countries where the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are endemic may be at higher risk of liver-related disease than Canadian-born residents. This study compared HBV- and HCV-related hospitalizations in Canadian immigrants (arriving from 1980 to 2013) and long-term residents (Canadian-born population and pre-1980 immigrants) and aimed to describe the burden of disease in both groups.

    Release date: 2022-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200200005
    Description:

    Using 2016 Census and administrative data, this study estimates the differences in weekly earnings received by workers in designated visible minority and White categories, as defined by the Employment Equity Act, employed in four broad sectors of the Canadian workforce. Of central interest is whether differences in weekly earnings between these categories were larger in small and medium-size commercial enterprises than they were in large commercial enterprises and in organizations and enterprises in the non-commercial sector.

    Release date: 2022-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200100004
    Description:

    Using data from the 2016 Census, this study compares the weekly earnings of individuals in designated visible minority and White categories, as defined in the Employment Equity Act. This paper addresses three sets of research questions. First, in 2015, were there significant differences in the estimated weekly earnings of individuals in designated visible minority categories relative to White people? Among which designated visible minority categories were differences in weekly earnings largest? Were these differences similar among women and men? Second, to what extent did sociodemographic and employment characteristics account for differences in average weekly earnings across designated visible minority and White categories? And third, were differences in average weekly earnings narrower, wider or about the same in 2015 as in 2005?

    Release date: 2022-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 46-28-0001202200100001
    Description:

    When a survey publishes statistics with a quality indicator, it is usually derived from measures based on sampling theory. The production of quality indicators is a significant challenge when statistics are produced using alternative sources for which no sampling is done. This paper describes a new method used to create a quality indicator that combines indicators obtained at different stages of data processing. An example of the application of the method in the Canadian Housing Statistics Program is provided in the Appendix.

    Release date: 2022-01-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2021009
    Description:

    This study assesses the degree to which administrative data, namely the Statistics Canada Longitudinal Worker File, can be used to construct individuals’ work histories. It describes why information obtained from work histories is useful, provides a brief overview of Canadian datasets that have measured work histories to date, and highlights the strengths and weaknesses of the Longitudinal Worker File, and household surveys regarding the construction of individuals’ work histories.

    Release date: 2021-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X202100100015
    Description:

    National statistical agencies such as Statistics Canada have a responsibility to convey the quality of statistical information to users. The methods traditionally used to do this are based on measures of sampling error. As a result, they are not adapted to the estimates produced using administrative data, for which the main sources of error are not due to sampling. A more suitable approach to reporting the quality of estimates presented in a multidimensional table is described in this paper. Quality indicators were derived for various post-acquisition processing steps, such as linkage, geocoding and imputation, by estimation domain. A clustering algorithm was then used to combine domains with similar quality levels for a given estimate. Ratings to inform users of the relative quality of estimates across domains were assigned to the groups created. This indicator, called the composite quality indicator (CQI), was developed and experimented with in the Canadian Housing Statistics Program (CHSP), which aims to produce official statistics on the residential housing sector in Canada using multiple administrative data sources.

    Keywords: Unsupervised machine learning, quality assurance, administrative data, data integration, clustering.

    Release date: 2021-10-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202100900001
    Description:

    In light of increasing Canadian immigration levels, an updated analysis of hospitalization patterns among immigrants to Canada, relative to the Canadian-born population, is needed to inform health care system policy and planning. Using immigrant landing administrative data linked to health care data, this descriptive study aims to examine hospitalization rates and leading causes of hospitalization, including mental health in immigrants and the Canadian-born population, stratified by sex and selected immigration characteristics.

    Release date: 2021-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202100800002
    Description:

    With data from the 2019 Canadian Community Health Survey, this study assessed the use of and exposure to handheld laser devices by Canadians and the potential associated health risks. In addition to the prevalence of handheld laser exposure or use, the frequency and type of injury sustained, and whether the injury was the result of personal use or someone else's use, the study also determined the type of handheld laser device being used and where the device was obtained.

    Release date: 2021-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2021004
    Description:

    International migration has become increasingly fluid and is viewed decreasingly as a one-time, permanent movement from a source country to a destination country. Immigrant-receiving countries often point to long-term economic- and population-related goals as motivations for permanent immigration programs, making immigrants’ presence and absence patterns of increasing policy interest. This article explores two methodological issues related to measuring immigrants’ potential presence in Canada. The first is the use of auxiliary administrative data sources as a means to supplement the T1 Income Tax Return file, which—to date—has been one of the key data sources used to estimate emigration among Canadian immigrants. The second is the evaluation of the sensitivity of emigration estimates to the definition of immigrant disappearance and reappearance in administrative data.

    Release date: 2021-03-16
Stats in brief (1)

Stats in brief (1) ((1 result))

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100030
    Description:

    It is too early to know how many Canadian workers will lose their job, i.e. will be permanently laid-off, as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and what will happen to them financially after job loss. Yet a number of stylized facts emerge from the past. While these facts do not necessarily allow accurate predictions of the impact of the pandemic on job displacement, they provide a long-term perspective from which forthcoming labour market developments can be assessed. The goal of this article is to highlight these facts.

    Release date: 2020-06-10
Articles and reports (28)

Articles and reports (28) (0 to 10 of 28 results)

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200600003
    Description:

    Every year, thousands of Canadian workers lose their job. The opportunities for coping with job loss through postsecondary education (PSE) transitions might be unequally distributed across Canadian families, perhaps even more so than across Canadian workers. Using data from Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker File (LWF), the T1 Family File (T1FF), the Post-Secondary Information System (PSIS), and the 2006 Census of Population, this study quantifies the degree to which the likelihood of entering PSE or a new field of study after job loss varies, all else equal, across types of family units and, among dual-earner couples, with the earnings or the risk of job loss of the spouse.

    Release date: 2022-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202200600003
    Description:

    Canadian immigrants from countries where the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are endemic may be at higher risk of liver-related disease than Canadian-born residents. This study compared HBV- and HCV-related hospitalizations in Canadian immigrants (arriving from 1980 to 2013) and long-term residents (Canadian-born population and pre-1980 immigrants) and aimed to describe the burden of disease in both groups.

    Release date: 2022-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200200005
    Description:

    Using 2016 Census and administrative data, this study estimates the differences in weekly earnings received by workers in designated visible minority and White categories, as defined by the Employment Equity Act, employed in four broad sectors of the Canadian workforce. Of central interest is whether differences in weekly earnings between these categories were larger in small and medium-size commercial enterprises than they were in large commercial enterprises and in organizations and enterprises in the non-commercial sector.

    Release date: 2022-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200100004
    Description:

    Using data from the 2016 Census, this study compares the weekly earnings of individuals in designated visible minority and White categories, as defined in the Employment Equity Act. This paper addresses three sets of research questions. First, in 2015, were there significant differences in the estimated weekly earnings of individuals in designated visible minority categories relative to White people? Among which designated visible minority categories were differences in weekly earnings largest? Were these differences similar among women and men? Second, to what extent did sociodemographic and employment characteristics account for differences in average weekly earnings across designated visible minority and White categories? And third, were differences in average weekly earnings narrower, wider or about the same in 2015 as in 2005?

    Release date: 2022-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 46-28-0001202200100001
    Description:

    When a survey publishes statistics with a quality indicator, it is usually derived from measures based on sampling theory. The production of quality indicators is a significant challenge when statistics are produced using alternative sources for which no sampling is done. This paper describes a new method used to create a quality indicator that combines indicators obtained at different stages of data processing. An example of the application of the method in the Canadian Housing Statistics Program is provided in the Appendix.

    Release date: 2022-01-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2021009
    Description:

    This study assesses the degree to which administrative data, namely the Statistics Canada Longitudinal Worker File, can be used to construct individuals’ work histories. It describes why information obtained from work histories is useful, provides a brief overview of Canadian datasets that have measured work histories to date, and highlights the strengths and weaknesses of the Longitudinal Worker File, and household surveys regarding the construction of individuals’ work histories.

    Release date: 2021-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X202100100015
    Description:

    National statistical agencies such as Statistics Canada have a responsibility to convey the quality of statistical information to users. The methods traditionally used to do this are based on measures of sampling error. As a result, they are not adapted to the estimates produced using administrative data, for which the main sources of error are not due to sampling. A more suitable approach to reporting the quality of estimates presented in a multidimensional table is described in this paper. Quality indicators were derived for various post-acquisition processing steps, such as linkage, geocoding and imputation, by estimation domain. A clustering algorithm was then used to combine domains with similar quality levels for a given estimate. Ratings to inform users of the relative quality of estimates across domains were assigned to the groups created. This indicator, called the composite quality indicator (CQI), was developed and experimented with in the Canadian Housing Statistics Program (CHSP), which aims to produce official statistics on the residential housing sector in Canada using multiple administrative data sources.

    Keywords: Unsupervised machine learning, quality assurance, administrative data, data integration, clustering.

    Release date: 2021-10-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202100900001
    Description:

    In light of increasing Canadian immigration levels, an updated analysis of hospitalization patterns among immigrants to Canada, relative to the Canadian-born population, is needed to inform health care system policy and planning. Using immigrant landing administrative data linked to health care data, this descriptive study aims to examine hospitalization rates and leading causes of hospitalization, including mental health in immigrants and the Canadian-born population, stratified by sex and selected immigration characteristics.

    Release date: 2021-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202100800002
    Description:

    With data from the 2019 Canadian Community Health Survey, this study assessed the use of and exposure to handheld laser devices by Canadians and the potential associated health risks. In addition to the prevalence of handheld laser exposure or use, the frequency and type of injury sustained, and whether the injury was the result of personal use or someone else's use, the study also determined the type of handheld laser device being used and where the device was obtained.

    Release date: 2021-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2021004
    Description:

    International migration has become increasingly fluid and is viewed decreasingly as a one-time, permanent movement from a source country to a destination country. Immigrant-receiving countries often point to long-term economic- and population-related goals as motivations for permanent immigration programs, making immigrants’ presence and absence patterns of increasing policy interest. This article explores two methodological issues related to measuring immigrants’ potential presence in Canada. The first is the use of auxiliary administrative data sources as a means to supplement the T1 Income Tax Return file, which—to date—has been one of the key data sources used to estimate emigration among Canadian immigrants. The second is the evaluation of the sensitivity of emigration estimates to the definition of immigrant disappearance and reappearance in administrative data.

    Release date: 2021-03-16
Journals and periodicals (1)

Journals and periodicals (1) ((1 result))

  • Journals and periodicals: 85F0031X
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area, Census agglomeration
    Description:

    Data on Aboriginal status contained in this report are based on self-reported (Census) and/or observational (crime) data. They provide information on the nature and extent of Aboriginal involvement in urban, rural and reserve crime as well as the socio-demographic profile of the population of Saskatchewan.

    Based on the 1996 Census data, the Aboriginal population in Saskatchewan tend to be younger, have lower educational levels, higher unemployment rates, and substantially lower incomes than the non-Aboriginal population. Crime rates on reserves were two times higher than rates in rural or urban areas of the province. For violent offences, the rate was almost five times higher on-reserve than in urban or rural areas.

    In all three areas (reserves, urban and rural areas), a larger proportion of adults than youth was accused of a violent offence or an "other" Criminal Code offence. In contrast, youth were more often accused of a property offence than any other offence type. In urban areas, there is an over-representation of Aboriginal persons involved in the criminal justice system. In 1997, more than one-half (52%) of those accused in Prince Albert, Regina and Saskatoon were Aboriginal compared to their 9% proportion in the population of these cities.

    A substantial difference in the male-female ratio of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal accused was found. Although the majority of all those accused were male, there was a greater proportion of Aboriginal female than non-Aboriginal female accused. Aboriginal accused tended to be younger than non-Aboriginal accused. Almost one-third (31%) of Aboriginal accused were aged 12 to 17 years of age compared to 23% of non-Aboriginal accused.

    In the two cities where victim data were available (Regina and Prince Albert), there was a greater proportion of Aboriginal than non-Aboriginal victims of violent crime compared to their proportion in the overall population of these cities. In 1997, 42% of victims in Prince Albert and Regina were Aboriginal, compared to their 10% proportion in the population of these cities.

    Release date: 2000-01-31
Date modified: