Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (115)

All (115) (0 to 10 of 115 results)

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100800006
    Description:

    Childcare supports labour force participation for parents, and can support language, early learning, and the social development of children before they enter the school system. However, there has been little consistent, comparable information on early learning and childcare businesses across the provinces and territories. This paper examines the business and economic characteristics of childcare in Canada, which is provided by firms through markets, and early learning services funded by governments through junior kindergarten and kindergarten. The paper uses administrative datasets to identify firms providing childcare services in Canada for children up to and including the age of 5 for the period from 2008 to 2016. The childcare firms are then used as a basis to examine the revenue and Gross domestic product of the childcare industry based on the type of firm (incorporated vs. unincorporated) generating the income.

    Release date: 2021-08-25

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202100100004
    Description:

    Multiple data sources are becoming increasingly available for statistical analyses in the era of big data. As an important example in finite-population inference, we consider an imputation approach to combining data from a probability survey and big found data. We focus on the case when the study variable is observed in the big data only, but the other auxiliary variables are commonly observed in both data. Unlike the usual imputation for missing data analysis, we create imputed values for all units in the probability sample. Such mass imputation is attractive in the context of survey data integration (Kim and Rao, 2012). We extend mass imputation as a tool for data integration of survey data and big non-survey data. The mass imputation methods and their statistical properties are presented. The matching estimator of Rivers (2007) is also covered as a special case. Variance estimation with mass-imputed data is discussed. The simulation results demonstrate the proposed estimators outperform existing competitors in terms of robustness and efficiency.

    Release date: 2021-06-24

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202100100018
    Description:

    Colorectal cancer screening, along with other health care services, was suspended in Canada in the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic response. This pause was deemed necessary to allow health care facilities to establish appropriate infection-control measures to prevent COVID-19 outbreaks and to reserve health system capacity for COVID-19 patients. The current article projects the impact of a three-month suspension of screening for colorectal cancer using a fecal test for average-risk individuals, and compares strategies to minimize the harm from screening interruptions. The projections come from OncoSim, a cancer microsimulation model co-developed by Statistics Canada and the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer.

    Release date: 2021-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100500006
    Description:

    While there are many studies that examine the relationships between neighbourhood characteristics and health outcomes, and between neighbourhood characteristics and neighbourhood satisfaction, the relationship between neighbourhood characteristics and subjective well-being, particularly life satisfaction, has received much less attention. The objective of this study is to fill this gap in order to help inform neighbourhood-based policy aimed at increasing well-being that is receiving increased attention.

    Release date: 2021-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100400006
    Description:

    Different sectors of the economy present different levels of risk of exposure to the coronavirus. Information about this risk may be important for evidence-based decision-making about how and when to impose or ease restrictions on businesses. To respond to this need, a network of academic researchers across Canada developed a new tool to measure the risk of COVID-19 exposure by occupation, and the importance of different sectors to the economy.

    Release date: 2021-04-28

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202100100004
    Description:

    The risks of mortality due to COVID-19 have been found to be higher for some Canadians (e.g., older population, especially those living in long term care residences, etc.). For Canadians living in close quarters there could also be an increased risk. This article examines the rate of mortality due to COVID-19 associated with people living in different types of private dwellings in Quebec and Ontario. Additionally, the size of the household and the living arrangements are also explored among individuals.

    Release date: 2021-04-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-28-0001201800100020
    Description:

    International Women’s Day is an opportunity to put a spotlight on the contributions of women to our country. Canada is home to many diverse population groups who enrich our society in a variety of ways. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic highlights the many ways these groups strengthen our society. Unfortunately, it has also created new challenges, particularly for women, as they have faced increased work at home and significant losses in the labour market. Several recent publications detail the impact of COVID-19 on women and how women are adjusting to these challenges.

    Release date: 2021-03-08

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2020088
    Description:

    Using a custom tabulation of data from the Monthly Retail Trade Survey, this infographic provides a graphical analysis of retail e-commerce vs. in-store sales for selected industries in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Release date: 2021-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100100004
    Description:

    In recent years, technological advancements in artificial intelligence and machine learning have broadened the realm of tasks that have the potential to be accomplished through automation technology. Consequently, these developments have raised questions about the future of work. Debate on this issue has focused primarily on the risk of job loss attributable to automation, with less attention given to how automation may change the nature of workers’ jobs. This study employs a task-based approach that shifts the focus from job replacement to changes in the nature of Canadians’ work. This approach views occupations as a set of tasks, allowing researchers to assess the effects of automation in the context of changes in occupational tasks.

    Release date: 2021-01-27

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100082
    Description:

    This article examines how the self-reported health and mental health of people with long-term health conditions or disabilities has changed since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic explored by age, sex and type of reported difficulty. Additionally, the rates of health service disruptions are explored by type of service and region.

    Release date: 2020-10-07
Stats in brief (8)

Stats in brief (8) ((8 results))

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202100100018
    Description:

    Colorectal cancer screening, along with other health care services, was suspended in Canada in the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic response. This pause was deemed necessary to allow health care facilities to establish appropriate infection-control measures to prevent COVID-19 outbreaks and to reserve health system capacity for COVID-19 patients. The current article projects the impact of a three-month suspension of screening for colorectal cancer using a fecal test for average-risk individuals, and compares strategies to minimize the harm from screening interruptions. The projections come from OncoSim, a cancer microsimulation model co-developed by Statistics Canada and the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer.

    Release date: 2021-06-17

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202100100004
    Description:

    The risks of mortality due to COVID-19 have been found to be higher for some Canadians (e.g., older population, especially those living in long term care residences, etc.). For Canadians living in close quarters there could also be an increased risk. This article examines the rate of mortality due to COVID-19 associated with people living in different types of private dwellings in Quebec and Ontario. Additionally, the size of the household and the living arrangements are also explored among individuals.

    Release date: 2021-04-13

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2020088
    Description:

    Using a custom tabulation of data from the Monthly Retail Trade Survey, this infographic provides a graphical analysis of retail e-commerce vs. in-store sales for selected industries in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Release date: 2021-02-05

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100082
    Description:

    This article examines how the self-reported health and mental health of people with long-term health conditions or disabilities has changed since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic explored by age, sex and type of reported difficulty. Additionally, the rates of health service disruptions are explored by type of service and region.

    Release date: 2020-10-07

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100067
    Description:

    This article presents an impact analysis and 2020 outlook for the For-hire Motor Carrier Freight Services Price Index (FHMCFSPI) amid the COVID-19 pandemic. The FHMCFSPI represents the change in the price of for-hire motor carrier freight services, which are services of goods transportation provided by the trucking industry.

    Release date: 2020-08-17

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100059
    Description:

    This article examines the willingness of Canadians to use tracing applications, whether or not they feel comfortable sharing the data with government officials, and reasons why they would not use the applications. Additionally, differences on these perceptions and reasons of using or not using tracing applications are explored by demographic characteristics including region, sex, and age.

    Release date: 2020-07-31

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100064
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic triggered decisions at all levels of government to try and minimize its spread, including shutting down non-essential retail establishments. This led to an abrupt shift in the Canadian retail environment, to which many industries had to adapt. This paper examines the impact of COVID-19 on retail e-commerce as a method of doing business during the first months of the pandemic.

    Release date: 2020-07-24

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2020039
    Description:

    Results of this infographic show a snapshot of Canadian's mental health at the time of the COVID-19 pandemic using the latest wave of data from the Canadian Perspectives Survey Series. Information presented includes Canadian's self-reported mental health, prevalence of moderate to severe levels of anxiety among gender groups, age groups and regional groups and a presentation of behaviours being done to improve both physical and mental health for those reporting different levels of anxiety.

    Release date: 2020-06-04
Articles and reports (105)

Articles and reports (105) (0 to 10 of 105 results)

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100800006
    Description:

    Childcare supports labour force participation for parents, and can support language, early learning, and the social development of children before they enter the school system. However, there has been little consistent, comparable information on early learning and childcare businesses across the provinces and territories. This paper examines the business and economic characteristics of childcare in Canada, which is provided by firms through markets, and early learning services funded by governments through junior kindergarten and kindergarten. The paper uses administrative datasets to identify firms providing childcare services in Canada for children up to and including the age of 5 for the period from 2008 to 2016. The childcare firms are then used as a basis to examine the revenue and Gross domestic product of the childcare industry based on the type of firm (incorporated vs. unincorporated) generating the income.

    Release date: 2021-08-25

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202100100004
    Description:

    Multiple data sources are becoming increasingly available for statistical analyses in the era of big data. As an important example in finite-population inference, we consider an imputation approach to combining data from a probability survey and big found data. We focus on the case when the study variable is observed in the big data only, but the other auxiliary variables are commonly observed in both data. Unlike the usual imputation for missing data analysis, we create imputed values for all units in the probability sample. Such mass imputation is attractive in the context of survey data integration (Kim and Rao, 2012). We extend mass imputation as a tool for data integration of survey data and big non-survey data. The mass imputation methods and their statistical properties are presented. The matching estimator of Rivers (2007) is also covered as a special case. Variance estimation with mass-imputed data is discussed. The simulation results demonstrate the proposed estimators outperform existing competitors in terms of robustness and efficiency.

    Release date: 2021-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100500006
    Description:

    While there are many studies that examine the relationships between neighbourhood characteristics and health outcomes, and between neighbourhood characteristics and neighbourhood satisfaction, the relationship between neighbourhood characteristics and subjective well-being, particularly life satisfaction, has received much less attention. The objective of this study is to fill this gap in order to help inform neighbourhood-based policy aimed at increasing well-being that is receiving increased attention.

    Release date: 2021-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100400006
    Description:

    Different sectors of the economy present different levels of risk of exposure to the coronavirus. Information about this risk may be important for evidence-based decision-making about how and when to impose or ease restrictions on businesses. To respond to this need, a network of academic researchers across Canada developed a new tool to measure the risk of COVID-19 exposure by occupation, and the importance of different sectors to the economy.

    Release date: 2021-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 89-28-0001201800100020
    Description:

    International Women’s Day is an opportunity to put a spotlight on the contributions of women to our country. Canada is home to many diverse population groups who enrich our society in a variety of ways. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic highlights the many ways these groups strengthen our society. Unfortunately, it has also created new challenges, particularly for women, as they have faced increased work at home and significant losses in the labour market. Several recent publications detail the impact of COVID-19 on women and how women are adjusting to these challenges.

    Release date: 2021-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100100004
    Description:

    In recent years, technological advancements in artificial intelligence and machine learning have broadened the realm of tasks that have the potential to be accomplished through automation technology. Consequently, these developments have raised questions about the future of work. Debate on this issue has focused primarily on the risk of job loss attributable to automation, with less attention given to how automation may change the nature of workers’ jobs. This study employs a task-based approach that shifts the focus from job replacement to changes in the nature of Canadians’ work. This approach views occupations as a set of tasks, allowing researchers to assess the effects of automation in the context of changes in occupational tasks.

    Release date: 2021-01-27

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2020005
    Description:

    An analysis of trends in Canadian consumer demand and sales using transaction data for grocery products amid the COVID-19 pandemic. This analysis includes Canadian grocery sales up to April 11.

    Release date: 2020-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2020004
    Description:

    An analysis of trends in Canadian consumer demand and sales using transaction data for grocery products amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Release date: 2020-04-08

  • Articles and reports: 89-28-0001201800100017
    Description:

    International Women's Day is Sunday, March 8, 2020. This day presents an opportunity to reflect on the progress made towards achieving gender equality and to raise awareness of the work left to be done. A number of recent Statistics Canada publications have highlighted the contribution of women to the Canadian economy and Canadian society more broadly.

    Release date: 2020-03-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020006
    Description:

    This paper examines the role of firm characteristics in accounting for the between-firm average employment earnings dispersion in the Canadian business sector between 2002 and 2015. It uses two decomposition methods to analyze the level of and changes in the between-firm average employment earnings dispersion by firm characteristics, such as productivity, globalization status (importing, exporting, foreign ownership), technology intensity, firm size, firm age, industry and geographic region.

    Release date: 2020-02-20
Journals and periodicals (2)

Journals and periodicals (2) ((2 results))

  • Journals and periodicals: 15-548-X
    Description:

    This document describes all aspects of output-based Gross Domestic Product (GDP), also known as GDP by industry or simply monthly GDP. It contains a comprehensive record of specific methodologies and data sources, on an industry by industry basis.

    It is meant to complement a previous Statistics Canada publication, released in November 2002, entitled Gross Domestic Product by Industry, Sources and Methods (Catalogue no. 15-547), which discusses in general terms the concepts, definitions, classifications and statistical methods underlying the monthly GDP measures.

    Release date: 2006-02-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 89F0117X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report outlines some initial results from the School Component of the first and second cycles of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). It examines the longitudinal influence of Early Childhood Care and Education and literacy activities on young children's future academic and cognitive outcomes. This overview highlights the information newly available from this component of the survey; it is not comprehensive in its coverage or its analysis. Indeed, the information collected by the NLSCY is so rich and detailed that researchers and analysts will be using it to address a variety of important questions concerning the education of children and youth in Canada for many years to come. Here then, we are merely scratching the surface to stimulate awareness of this rich new data source, and to illustrate the kinds of analyses it makes possible.

    Release date: 1999-10-14
Featured Products (0)

Featured Products (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: