Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (100)

All (100) (0 to 10 of 100 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2020039
    Description:

    Results of this infographic show a snapshot of Canadian's mental health at the time of the COVID-19 pandemic using the latest wave of data from the Canadian Perspectives Survey Series. Information presented includes Canadian's self-reported mental health, prevalence of moderate to severe levels of anxiety among gender groups, age groups and regional groups and a presentation of behaviours being done to improve both physical and mental health for those reporting different levels of anxiety.

    Release date: 2020-06-04

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2020005
    Description:

    An analysis of trends in Canadian consumer demand and sales using transaction data for grocery products amid the COVID-19 pandemic. This analysis includes Canadian grocery sales up to April 11.

    Release date: 2020-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2020004
    Description:

    An analysis of trends in Canadian consumer demand and sales using transaction data for grocery products amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Release date: 2020-04-08

  • Articles and reports: 89-28-0001201800100017
    Description:

    International Women's Day is Sunday, March 8, 2020. This day presents an opportunity to reflect on the progress made towards achieving gender equality and to raise awareness of the work left to be done. A number of recent Statistics Canada publications have highlighted the contribution of women to the Canadian economy and Canadian society more broadly.

    Release date: 2020-03-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020006
    Description:

    This paper examines the role of firm characteristics in accounting for the between-firm average employment earnings dispersion in the Canadian business sector between 2002 and 2015. It uses two decomposition methods to analyze the level of and changes in the between-firm average employment earnings dispersion by firm characteristics, such as productivity, globalization status (importing, exporting, foreign ownership), technology intensity, firm size, firm age, industry and geographic region.

    Release date: 2020-02-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2020001
    Description:

    This paper reviews alternative measures of income mixing within geographic units and applies them using geographically detailed income data derived from tax records. It highlights the characteristics of these measures, particularly their ease of interpretation and their suitability to decomposition across different levels of analysis, from neighbourhoods to individual apartment buildings. The discussion focuses on three measures: the dissimilarity index, the information theory index and the divergence index (D-index). Particular emphasis is placed on the D-index because it most effectively describes how income distributions at the sub-metropolitan level (e.g., neighbourhoods) differ from distributions at the metropolitan level (i.e., how much income sorting occurs across neighbourhoods). Furthermore, the D-index can consistently measure the contributions of income sorting within neighbourhoods (e.g., across individual apartment buildings) to the degree of income mixing at the neighbourhood and metropolitan scales.

    Release date: 2020-01-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900300009
    Description:

    We discuss a relevant inference for the alpha coefficient (Cronbach, 1951) - a popular ratio-type statistic for the covariances and variances in survey sampling including complex survey sampling with unequal selection probabilities. This study can help investigators who wish to evaluate various psychological or social instruments used in large surveys. For the survey data, we investigate workable confidence intervals by using two approaches: (1) the linearization method using the influence function and (2) the coverage-corrected bootstrap method. The linearization method provides adequate coverage rates with correlated ordinal values that many instruments consist of; however, this method may not be as good with some non-normal underlying distributions, e.g., a multi-lognormal distribution. We suggest that the coverage-corrected bootstrap method can be used as a complement to the linearization method, because the coverage-corrected bootstrap method is computer-intensive. Using the developed methods, we provide the confidence intervals for the alpha coefficient to assess various mental health instruments (Kessler 10, Kessler 6 and Sheehan Disability Scale) for different demographics using data from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R).

    Release date: 2019-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900200001
    Description:

    Development of imputation procedures appropriate for data with extreme values or nonlinear relationships to covariates is a significant challenge in large scale surveys. We develop an imputation procedure for complex surveys based on semiparametric quantile regression. We apply the method to the Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP), a large-scale survey that collects data used in quantifying soil loss from crop fields. In the imputation procedure, we first generate imputed values from a semiparametric model for the quantiles of the conditional distribution of the response given a covariate. Then, we estimate the parameters of interest using the generalized method of moments (GMM). We derive the asymptotic distribution of the GMM estimators for a general class of complex survey designs. In simulations meant to represent the CEAP data, we evaluate variance estimators based on the asymptotic distribution and compare the semiparametric quantile regression imputation (QRI) method to fully parametric and nonparametric alternatives. The QRI procedure is more efficient than nonparametric and fully parametric alternatives, and empirical coverages of confidence intervals are within 1% of the nominal 95% level. An application to estimation of mean erosion indicates that QRI may be a viable option for CEAP.

    Release date: 2019-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 71-222-X2019002
    Description:

    This article describes a summary profile of workers who were self-employed in their main job during the 12 months prior to September 2018, with a focus on the main reasons motivating them to be their own boss.

    Release date: 2019-05-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900100009
    Description:

    The demand for small area estimates by users of Statistics Canada’s data has been steadily increasing over recent years. In this paper, we provide a summary of procedures that have been incorporated into a SAS based production system for producing official small area estimates at Statistics Canada. This system includes: procedures based on unit or area level models; the incorporation of the sampling design; the ability to smooth the design variance for each small area if an area level model is used; the ability to ensure that the small area estimates add up to reliable higher level estimates; and the development of diagnostic tools to test the adequacy of the model. The production system has been used to produce small area estimates on an experimental basis for several surveys at Statistics Canada that include: the estimation of health characteristics, the estimation of under-coverage in the census, the estimation of manufacturing sales and the estimation of unemployment rates and employment counts for the Labour Force Survey. Some of the diagnostics implemented in the system are illustrated using Labour Force Survey data along with administrative auxiliary data.

    Release date: 2019-05-07
Stats in brief (1)

Stats in brief (1) ((1 result))

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2020039
    Description:

    Results of this infographic show a snapshot of Canadian's mental health at the time of the COVID-19 pandemic using the latest wave of data from the Canadian Perspectives Survey Series. Information presented includes Canadian's self-reported mental health, prevalence of moderate to severe levels of anxiety among gender groups, age groups and regional groups and a presentation of behaviours being done to improve both physical and mental health for those reporting different levels of anxiety.

    Release date: 2020-06-04
Articles and reports (97)

Articles and reports (97) (0 to 10 of 97 results)

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2020005
    Description:

    An analysis of trends in Canadian consumer demand and sales using transaction data for grocery products amid the COVID-19 pandemic. This analysis includes Canadian grocery sales up to April 11.

    Release date: 2020-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2020004
    Description:

    An analysis of trends in Canadian consumer demand and sales using transaction data for grocery products amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Release date: 2020-04-08

  • Articles and reports: 89-28-0001201800100017
    Description:

    International Women's Day is Sunday, March 8, 2020. This day presents an opportunity to reflect on the progress made towards achieving gender equality and to raise awareness of the work left to be done. A number of recent Statistics Canada publications have highlighted the contribution of women to the Canadian economy and Canadian society more broadly.

    Release date: 2020-03-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020006
    Description:

    This paper examines the role of firm characteristics in accounting for the between-firm average employment earnings dispersion in the Canadian business sector between 2002 and 2015. It uses two decomposition methods to analyze the level of and changes in the between-firm average employment earnings dispersion by firm characteristics, such as productivity, globalization status (importing, exporting, foreign ownership), technology intensity, firm size, firm age, industry and geographic region.

    Release date: 2020-02-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2020001
    Description:

    This paper reviews alternative measures of income mixing within geographic units and applies them using geographically detailed income data derived from tax records. It highlights the characteristics of these measures, particularly their ease of interpretation and their suitability to decomposition across different levels of analysis, from neighbourhoods to individual apartment buildings. The discussion focuses on three measures: the dissimilarity index, the information theory index and the divergence index (D-index). Particular emphasis is placed on the D-index because it most effectively describes how income distributions at the sub-metropolitan level (e.g., neighbourhoods) differ from distributions at the metropolitan level (i.e., how much income sorting occurs across neighbourhoods). Furthermore, the D-index can consistently measure the contributions of income sorting within neighbourhoods (e.g., across individual apartment buildings) to the degree of income mixing at the neighbourhood and metropolitan scales.

    Release date: 2020-01-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900300009
    Description:

    We discuss a relevant inference for the alpha coefficient (Cronbach, 1951) - a popular ratio-type statistic for the covariances and variances in survey sampling including complex survey sampling with unequal selection probabilities. This study can help investigators who wish to evaluate various psychological or social instruments used in large surveys. For the survey data, we investigate workable confidence intervals by using two approaches: (1) the linearization method using the influence function and (2) the coverage-corrected bootstrap method. The linearization method provides adequate coverage rates with correlated ordinal values that many instruments consist of; however, this method may not be as good with some non-normal underlying distributions, e.g., a multi-lognormal distribution. We suggest that the coverage-corrected bootstrap method can be used as a complement to the linearization method, because the coverage-corrected bootstrap method is computer-intensive. Using the developed methods, we provide the confidence intervals for the alpha coefficient to assess various mental health instruments (Kessler 10, Kessler 6 and Sheehan Disability Scale) for different demographics using data from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R).

    Release date: 2019-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900200001
    Description:

    Development of imputation procedures appropriate for data with extreme values or nonlinear relationships to covariates is a significant challenge in large scale surveys. We develop an imputation procedure for complex surveys based on semiparametric quantile regression. We apply the method to the Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP), a large-scale survey that collects data used in quantifying soil loss from crop fields. In the imputation procedure, we first generate imputed values from a semiparametric model for the quantiles of the conditional distribution of the response given a covariate. Then, we estimate the parameters of interest using the generalized method of moments (GMM). We derive the asymptotic distribution of the GMM estimators for a general class of complex survey designs. In simulations meant to represent the CEAP data, we evaluate variance estimators based on the asymptotic distribution and compare the semiparametric quantile regression imputation (QRI) method to fully parametric and nonparametric alternatives. The QRI procedure is more efficient than nonparametric and fully parametric alternatives, and empirical coverages of confidence intervals are within 1% of the nominal 95% level. An application to estimation of mean erosion indicates that QRI may be a viable option for CEAP.

    Release date: 2019-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 71-222-X2019002
    Description:

    This article describes a summary profile of workers who were self-employed in their main job during the 12 months prior to September 2018, with a focus on the main reasons motivating them to be their own boss.

    Release date: 2019-05-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900100009
    Description:

    The demand for small area estimates by users of Statistics Canada’s data has been steadily increasing over recent years. In this paper, we provide a summary of procedures that have been incorporated into a SAS based production system for producing official small area estimates at Statistics Canada. This system includes: procedures based on unit or area level models; the incorporation of the sampling design; the ability to smooth the design variance for each small area if an area level model is used; the ability to ensure that the small area estimates add up to reliable higher level estimates; and the development of diagnostic tools to test the adequacy of the model. The production system has been used to produce small area estimates on an experimental basis for several surveys at Statistics Canada that include: the estimation of health characteristics, the estimation of under-coverage in the census, the estimation of manufacturing sales and the estimation of unemployment rates and employment counts for the Labour Force Survey. Some of the diagnostics implemented in the system are illustrated using Labour Force Survey data along with administrative auxiliary data.

    Release date: 2019-05-07

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100002
    Description:

    Commuting is a fact of life for millions of Canadians. Using data from the 2016 Census on place of work and commuting, this study examines the characteristics of those who spend at least 60 minutes travelling to work, with a focus on those who commute by car, truck or van (or “car commuters”).

    Release date: 2019-02-25
Journals and periodicals (2)

Journals and periodicals (2) ((2 results))

  • Journals and periodicals: 15-548-X
    Description:

    This document describes all aspects of output-based Gross Domestic Product (GDP), also known as GDP by industry or simply monthly GDP. It contains a comprehensive record of specific methodologies and data sources, on an industry by industry basis.

    It is meant to complement a previous Statistics Canada publication, released in November 2002, entitled Gross Domestic Product by Industry, Sources and Methods (Catalogue no. 15-547), which discusses in general terms the concepts, definitions, classifications and statistical methods underlying the monthly GDP measures.

    Release date: 2006-02-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 89F0117X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report outlines some initial results from the School Component of the first and second cycles of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). It examines the longitudinal influence of Early Childhood Care and Education and literacy activities on young children's future academic and cognitive outcomes. This overview highlights the information newly available from this component of the survey; it is not comprehensive in its coverage or its analysis. Indeed, the information collected by the NLSCY is so rich and detailed that researchers and analysts will be using it to address a variety of important questions concerning the education of children and youth in Canada for many years to come. Here then, we are merely scratching the surface to stimulate awareness of this rich new data source, and to illustrate the kinds of analyses it makes possible.

    Release date: 1999-10-14
Date modified: