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  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20020097886
    Description:

    This release provides data on the research and development activities of the private non-profit sector. Although the contribution of this sector to the national research and development effort is small in dollar terms, (approximately 0.6% of the total research and development performed in Canada for 2001) its impact, particularly in the university and hospital sectors, is significant.

    Release date: 2002-12-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 16F0024X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Businesses today are involved in a variety of practices aimed at preventing or reducing environmental degradation generated from their production activity. During the 1990s, the environmental regulation context changed. Increasingly, governments have relied on voluntary initiatives undertaken by businesses to reduce pollutants and waste, as opposed to regulations. However, at the same time, the federal authorities have undertaken to revise the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA), in order to increase federal power for environmental regulation but with strong emphasis put on promoting pollution prevention. Consequently, businesses today are looking at alternative ways to limit impacts from their operations on the environment.

    Environmental Management and Technologies in the Business Sector presents a profile of business demand for environmental processes and technologies, pollution prevention methods and environmental practices, such as environmental management systems and voluntary actions. What types of treatment processes are the most popular ones for reducing gas emissions, liquid, solid and hazardous waste, noise, radiation and vibration, for saving energy or for site reclamation? What is the market for environmental processes and technologies? What pollution prevention methods are used more frequently? What additional environmental practices have businesses adopted (for instance, are voluntary programs more popular than eco-labelling?)?

    This paper is based on results from the Survey of Environmental Protection Expenditures. For the first time, the survey asked detailed questions on the type of environmental process or technology used and the adoption of environmental practices. The paper is a complement to both 1996-1997 and 1998 Environmental Protection Expenditures in the Business Sector reports (Catalogue no. 16F0006XIE).

    Release date: 2002-12-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-558-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Cyber-crime is a global problem that in many instances transcends national borders. Historically, compiling meaningful statistics about this activity has been difficult because of the reluctance on the part of victims to report these offences to police. However, because of the financial losses sustained, an increasing number of these crimes are being reported to police. As a result, federal, provincial and territorial governments, as well as the police community, are interested in analyzing national trends on cyber-crime and their impact on Canadians.

    In response to this need for information, the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCJS) conducted a Special Study to examine the issues and data sources related to cyber-crime and to investigate the feasibility of collecting quantitative data from police services in Canada. This report examines definitions of cyber-crime, current legislation in Canada and other countries, existing data sources, summarizes results from consultations with selected police forces, and presents options for collecting cyber-crime data from police agencies.

    Release date: 2002-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20021126392
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the characteristics of men 55 and over who are no longer active in the labour market, and the "voluntary" or "involuntary" reasons for inactivity.

    Release date: 2002-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020036393
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at how people feel about their neighbourhood.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020036394
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article explores the demographic, social and economic characteristics of the underweight population.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020036395
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which Canadian families are financially vulnerable to adverse events, such as a sudden loss of income or unexpected bills.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020036396
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article focusses on the change in unmet health care needs reported by Canadians from 1998 to 2001, using data from the Canadian Community Health Survey and the National Population Health Survey.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020036397
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article addresses overqualification, which concerns both workers and employers because people who hold jobs that make few demands on their skills have lower earnings and lower levels of productivity.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 31F0027M2002001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper describes the main characteristics of the Canadian lumber industry, looks at the different impacts of lumber trade disputes, and puts into perspective the strong reliance of the Canadian lumber industry on the U.S. market, its biggest customer.

    Release date: 2002-12-17
Stats in brief (13)

Stats in brief (13) (0 to 10 of 13 results)

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20020097886
    Description:

    This release provides data on the research and development activities of the private non-profit sector. Although the contribution of this sector to the national research and development effort is small in dollar terms, (approximately 0.6% of the total research and development performed in Canada for 2001) its impact, particularly in the university and hospital sectors, is significant.

    Release date: 2002-12-24

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20020087887
    Description:

    Statistics presented are derived from a survey of eight Provincial Research Organizations (PRO): All of these organizations have been established by their respective provincial governments, with a variety of enabling legislation and powers, to provide technical support to primary and secondary industries, to assist in the exploitation of provincial natural resources and to enhance the economy of their provinces. Small and medium-sized companies with limited inhouse technical capability use the services of the provincial research organizations.

    Release date: 2002-12-16

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20020067892
    Description:

    Institutions in the higher education sector usually have records of funds received by them specifically for research and development , and some can provide lists of research projects carried out by staff. The research and development expenditure estimates are based on reports of payments awarded to institutions through the annual survey of the Canadian Association of University Business Officers (CAUBO).

    Release date: 2002-11-27

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20020077889
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Gross domestic expenditures on research and development (GERD) represents total research and development expenditures performed in a country's national territory during a given year. GERD includes R&D performed within a country and funded from abroad but excludes payments sent abroad for research and development performed in other countries.

    Release date: 2002-11-27

  • Stats in brief: 88-003-X20020036377
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    After several difficult years, radio is making a comeback. Total revenues in the radio industry reached over $1 billion. This increase is partly explained by the launch of new stations, but mainly due to FM broadcasting, with 71% of the industry revenues coming from the FM sector.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20020057896
    Description:

    This bulletin provides recent information on the performance and funding of Federal Government Expenditures on Scientific Activities, 2002-2003. The statistics presented are derived from the survey of the science and technology (S&T) activities of federal departments and agencies. According to international convention, S&T is divided into two fields; Natural Sciences and Engineering (NSE) and Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH). These fields of science are further divided into Research and Development (R&D) and Related Scientific Activities (RSA).

    Release date: 2002-10-30

  • Stats in brief: 63-016-X20020026451
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The surveying and mapping services industry plays a key role in supporting other sectors of the economy: - the energy sector calls upon the services of geophysical surveying and mapping firms; - municipal governments, businesses, and homeowners require the services of land surveyors; and - both the private and the public sectors require custom mapping services, for a variety of applications.

    Release date: 2002-10-28

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20020047897
    Description:

    The statistics in this bulletin are derived from the 2000 survey of industrial research and development activities in Canada, which covers firms spending a million dollars or more on the performance or funding of research and development in Canada, and from the administrative data of the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (CCRA) for firms which spend less than a million dollars on the performance or funding of research and development in Canada. The use of CCRA data results in a small understatement in total figures for the most recent years reported.

    Release date: 2002-07-19

  • Stats in brief: 13-604-M2002039
    Description:

    The latest annual results for the US/Canada purchasing power parities (PPPs) and real expenditures per head in the US compared with Canada are published in this paper. The data were developed for the period 1992 to 2001, using the latest US and Canada expenditure data from the National Accounts and price comparisons for 1999. The paper contains summaries of differences between the results of the multilateral (OECD) study and the Statistics Canada bilateral study. Some differences in classifications have been incorporated, as well as normal national Accounts revisions. Ten tables are presented in an Appendix for 21 categories of expenditure for the GDP.

    Release date: 2002-06-28

  • Stats in brief: 85F0027X2002001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics conducted a special study on conditional sentencing in 2001 to improve the level and quality of information available on this disposition and to assess the influence of the new sanction on correctional services caseloads. The purpose of this bulletin is to provide a preliminary examination of the results of the special study, as well as the most current data from the Adult Correctional Services Survey and the Adult Criminal Court Survey.

    Release date: 2002-06-04
Articles and reports (279)

Articles and reports (279) (0 to 10 of 279 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20021126392
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the characteristics of men 55 and over who are no longer active in the labour market, and the "voluntary" or "involuntary" reasons for inactivity.

    Release date: 2002-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020036393
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at how people feel about their neighbourhood.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020036394
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article explores the demographic, social and economic characteristics of the underweight population.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020036395
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which Canadian families are financially vulnerable to adverse events, such as a sudden loss of income or unexpected bills.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020036396
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article focusses on the change in unmet health care needs reported by Canadians from 1998 to 2001, using data from the Canadian Community Health Survey and the National Population Health Survey.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020036397
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article addresses overqualification, which concerns both workers and employers because people who hold jobs that make few demands on their skills have lower earnings and lower levels of productivity.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 31F0027M2002001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper describes the main characteristics of the Canadian lumber industry, looks at the different impacts of lumber trade disputes, and puts into perspective the strong reliance of the Canadian lumber industry on the U.S. market, its biggest customer.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 1996, 17% of Canada's total population were immigrants, and 88% of them were living in urban regions. The three provinces with the largest urban centres attracted most immigrants: 55% went to Ontario, 18% to British Columbia and 13% to Quebec, a pattern that has remained constant for immigrants who have arrived since 1961. The remaining 12% (or 580,000 people) were living in predominantly rural regions. They can be characterized by the period in which they arrived in Canada.

    Recent and new immigrants were better educated than pre-1981 immigrants, particularly in terms of university education. But pre-1981 immigrants had the highest employment rate and were more likely to have professional service occupations than the Canadian-born. Visible minority immigrants fared worse, in socio-economic terms, than non-visible minority immigrants; these differences were more pronounced in predominantly rural regions. The profiles of immigrants in predominantly rural regions were similar to those in predominantly urban regions. However, the few immigrants who resided in rural northern regions had a very different and more favourable profile.

    Release date: 2002-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 96F0030X2001005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This theme deals with Canadians'mother tongue and language spoken at home, as well as with their knowledge of English and French. Data from the 2001 Census show, despite an increasingly multilingual Canadian society, that linguistic duality persists. In addition, the theme covers the evolution of English-French bilingualism in the country, and does this for each of the groups that have either English, French or some language other than English or French, as their mother tongue. All of the analyses are done at the province' territory level; some of them are also done at the level of the census metropolitan area.

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Dailyin the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2002-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 96F0030X2001006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Internet report presents the highlights of the mobility and migration data release from the 2001 Census of Population and Housing. Numerous colour maps, charts and tables illustrate the latest interprovincial and intermetropolitan migration trends observed from the published data.

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Dailyin the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2002-12-10
Journals and periodicals (17)

Journals and periodicals (17) (0 to 10 of 17 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 16F0024X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Businesses today are involved in a variety of practices aimed at preventing or reducing environmental degradation generated from their production activity. During the 1990s, the environmental regulation context changed. Increasingly, governments have relied on voluntary initiatives undertaken by businesses to reduce pollutants and waste, as opposed to regulations. However, at the same time, the federal authorities have undertaken to revise the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA), in order to increase federal power for environmental regulation but with strong emphasis put on promoting pollution prevention. Consequently, businesses today are looking at alternative ways to limit impacts from their operations on the environment.

    Environmental Management and Technologies in the Business Sector presents a profile of business demand for environmental processes and technologies, pollution prevention methods and environmental practices, such as environmental management systems and voluntary actions. What types of treatment processes are the most popular ones for reducing gas emissions, liquid, solid and hazardous waste, noise, radiation and vibration, for saving energy or for site reclamation? What is the market for environmental processes and technologies? What pollution prevention methods are used more frequently? What additional environmental practices have businesses adopted (for instance, are voluntary programs more popular than eco-labelling?)?

    This paper is based on results from the Survey of Environmental Protection Expenditures. For the first time, the survey asked detailed questions on the type of environmental process or technology used and the adoption of environmental practices. The paper is a complement to both 1996-1997 and 1998 Environmental Protection Expenditures in the Business Sector reports (Catalogue no. 16F0006XIE).

    Release date: 2002-12-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-558-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Cyber-crime is a global problem that in many instances transcends national borders. Historically, compiling meaningful statistics about this activity has been difficult because of the reluctance on the part of victims to report these offences to police. However, because of the financial losses sustained, an increasing number of these crimes are being reported to police. As a result, federal, provincial and territorial governments, as well as the police community, are interested in analyzing national trends on cyber-crime and their impact on Canadians.

    In response to this need for information, the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCJS) conducted a Special Study to examine the issues and data sources related to cyber-crime and to investigate the feasibility of collecting quantitative data from police services in Canada. This report examines definitions of cyber-crime, current legislation in Canada and other countries, existing data sources, summarizes results from consultations with selected police forces, and presents options for collecting cyber-crime data from police agencies.

    Release date: 2002-12-19

  • Journals and periodicals: 31F0027M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The intent of this research paper series is to address a variety of topics related to the Canadian manufacturing sector as a whole. The papers in this series are based on the Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM) and focus on the entire manufacturing sector (all 22 major manufacturing groups). Other data sources are used in specific papers. The topics covered include packaging products used by manufacturing industries, evolution of production costs, comparison of establishment groups (ranked by volume of shipments) and stages of processing.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 82F0077X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The objective of this working paper series is to analyse the comparability of surveys conducted by Statistics Canada on smoking, to highlight the changes in the data among data years and to illustrate their statistical significance. The aim is to clarify any confusion regarding comparability of survey estimates of smoking prevalence and daily cigarette consumption over this period, as well as to provide the user-requested data in a technical but understandable format.

    Release date: 2002-12-16

  • Journals and periodicals: 51F0009X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Since September 11, 2001, important changes in the financial and operating statistics of airline activities in Canada have taken place. In particular, most airline companies have seen a deterioration of their financial positions and the number of flights and of seats available have generally decreased while security measures have increased. The aim of this paper is to examine the post-September 11 aviation market in Canada with respect to one key operating characteristic: the number of flights of airline companies operating in Canada. More specifically, the following questions are addressed: Was there a recovery in airline activities in Canada since September 11? Were all losses in all sectors recovered (domestic, transborder and international)? Were all losses at all airports recovered?

    This paper is divided into three sections: 1. Data sources and limitations, the scope of this research and the methodological approach used are described in the first section. 2. The second section highlights the main results obtained and discusses these results in the context of the recent trends in airline activities in Canada. 3. Lastly, some conclusions are offered, based on the evidence collected and analysed.

    Release date: 2002-12-05

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-578-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered "Yes" to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 35,000 adults and 8,000 children living in private, and some collective, households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the survey. The data were collected in the fall of 2001. The survey was last conducted after the 1991 Census under the title of the 1991 Health and Activity Limitation Survey (HALS). This report presents an overview of the methodological and content changes between the 1991 HALS and the 2001 PALS. The major differences include new census disability filter questions, a new sampling plan and new questionnaire content.

    Release date: 2002-12-03

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-557-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In January 1999, the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCJS) received a commitment of four years funding from the federal government's Policy Research Initiative (PRI) to conduct a study on hate crime in Canada. The purpose of the overall study is to enhance our understanding of hate crime and to assess the feasibility of collecting police-reported hate crime statistics in Canada. In 2001, the CCJS released a report entitled "Hate crime in Canada: an overview of issues and data sources", catalogue no. 85-551-XIE.

    This report helped to address some questions regarding the nature and magnitude of hate crimes in Canada, although certain data gaps were identified. As a result, it was determined that a pilot survey should be conducted with police departments that collect hate crime statistics. In order to determine specific information needs for the pilot survey, consultations were held with a number of academics; members of various non-governmental and community organizations; and federal and provincial departments responsible for the administration of justice, as well as police departments.

    The information contained in this report provides a summary of the consultations that were held between September 2001 and March 2002.

    Release date: 2002-10-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 56F0009X
    Description:

    This is a condensed version of the study Unveiling the digital divide (Connectedness series), catalogue no. 56F0004MIE no. 7, and covers the same subject matter. The digital divide, commonly understood as the gap between information and communications technology (ICT) 'haves' and 'have-nots', has emerged as an important issue of our times, largely due to the uneven diffusion of the Internet.

    Many variables, including income, education, age and geographical location, exert significant influences on household penetration of both ICT and non-ICT commodities. Thus, divides can be defined for any permutation of the above. In the case of ICTs, divides depend on the specific technology, its timing of introduction, as well as the variable of interest.

    This study shows that the digital divide is sizeable; ICT penetration rates grow with income. Generally, the effect of income is larger on newer ICTs (Internet, computers, cell phones) than older and established ones (television, telephone). Then, using the Internet penetration of households by detailed income level, it finds that in an overall sense the Internet divide is slowly closing. This, however, is the result of the accelerated adoption of the Internet by middle-income households - particularly upper middle. The Internet divide is widening when the lowest income deciles are compared with the highest income decile.

    At the same time, the rates of growth of Internet adoption among lower-income households exceed those of higher-income households. This is typical of penetration patterns of ICT and non-ICT commodities. Rates of growth are initially very high among high-income groups, but at later stages it is the penetration of lower-income groups that grows faster.

    Release date: 2002-10-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-556-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Recognizing that there is the need for better information and statistics on organized crime, and for methodologies to measure its impact on Canadians, the federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for Justice have endorsed a plan to begin addressing Canada's data gap in the area of organized crime.

    The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics was contracted by the Solicitor General of Canada to investigate the feasibility of collecting quantitative data on organized crime. This report highlights the lessons learned during consultations with selected police intelligence units and it presents a number of options for data collection.

    Release date: 2002-09-27

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-592-X
    Description:

    This Pan-Canadian Education Research Agenda (PCERA) 2001 symposium synthesis report was written by Dr. Yvonne Hébert of the University of Calgary. This synthesis report offers a critical review of the research presented at the third PCERA symposium held at Laval University in Québec on May 22 and 23, 2001. The symposium, which was held in conjunction with the Canadian Society for the Study of Education (CSSE) and the Canadian Society for the Study of Higher Education (CSSHE) during the annual Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities, explored research and policy issues related to the role of teacher education/educator training, teacher/educator supply and demand, teacher/educator professional development, indicators of success, and leadership.

    This report addresses the major policy issues that were discussed at the event and offers recommendations for future research.

    Release date: 2002-09-12
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