Sort Help
entries

Results

All (50)

All (50) (0 to 10 of 50 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-599-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The fact sheets in this series provide an "at-a-glance" overview of particular aspects of education in Canada and summarize key data trends in selected tables published as part of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP).

    The PCEIP mission is to publish a set of statistical measures on education systems in Canada for policy makers, practitioners and the general public to monitor the performance of education systems across jurisdictions and over time. PCEIP is a joint venture of Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC).

    Release date: 2018-10-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114655
    Description:

    Based on a self-reported measure of overqualification, this article examines the association between overqualification and skills among workers aged 25 to 64 with a university degree, using data from the 2012 Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC). This article also examines the extent to which overqualified workers are dissatisfied with their jobs. Overqualified workers are defined in this study as university-educated workers who reported that they were in a job requiring no more than a high school education.

    Release date: 2016-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114640
    Description:

    Women have become increasingly well-educated, and today their share in the Canadian labour market is larger than ever. This chapter of Women in Canada examines women’s educational experiences, with a focus on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics and computer science) education and skills. Topics include a profile of women’s education in Canada, the skills of young girls and women, field-of-study patterns at the postsecondary level, and labour market outcomes, including earnings.

    Release date: 2016-07-06

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201613914401
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-05-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114630
    Description:

    This article examines the literacy and numeracy skills of off reserve First Nations and Métis adults aged 25 to 65, focusing on the factors and labour market outcomes associated with higher skill levels. In this study, individuals in the higher range for literacy and numeracy are defined as those who scored level 3 or higher (out of 5 levels) in tests administered by the 2012 Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC).

    Release date: 2016-05-18

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201605513942
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-02-24

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201605413681
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114313
    Description:

    The chapter entitled "Women in Canada: First Nations, Métis and Inuit Women" explores the diverse circumstances and experiences of Aboriginal women in Canada. Overall, the chapter highlights demographic characteristics, families, housing, knowledge of Aboriginal languages, employment, income, education, and health. Where appropriate, comparisons have been made between the Aboriginal female population and the non-Aboriginal female population as well as the Aboriginal female population and Aboriginal male population. Wherever possible, information is provided for First Nations, Métis and Inuit women separately.

    Release date: 2016-02-23

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201535812961
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-12-24

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201517312523
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-06-22
Stats in brief (6)

Stats in brief (6) ((6 results))

Articles and reports (29)

Articles and reports (29) (0 to 10 of 29 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114655
    Description:

    Based on a self-reported measure of overqualification, this article examines the association between overqualification and skills among workers aged 25 to 64 with a university degree, using data from the 2012 Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC). This article also examines the extent to which overqualified workers are dissatisfied with their jobs. Overqualified workers are defined in this study as university-educated workers who reported that they were in a job requiring no more than a high school education.

    Release date: 2016-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114640
    Description:

    Women have become increasingly well-educated, and today their share in the Canadian labour market is larger than ever. This chapter of Women in Canada examines women’s educational experiences, with a focus on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics and computer science) education and skills. Topics include a profile of women’s education in Canada, the skills of young girls and women, field-of-study patterns at the postsecondary level, and labour market outcomes, including earnings.

    Release date: 2016-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114630
    Description:

    This article examines the literacy and numeracy skills of off reserve First Nations and Métis adults aged 25 to 65, focusing on the factors and labour market outcomes associated with higher skill levels. In this study, individuals in the higher range for literacy and numeracy are defined as those who scored level 3 or higher (out of 5 levels) in tests administered by the 2012 Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC).

    Release date: 2016-05-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114313
    Description:

    The chapter entitled "Women in Canada: First Nations, Métis and Inuit Women" explores the diverse circumstances and experiences of Aboriginal women in Canada. Overall, the chapter highlights demographic characteristics, families, housing, knowledge of Aboriginal languages, employment, income, education, and health. Where appropriate, comparisons have been made between the Aboriginal female population and the non-Aboriginal female population as well as the Aboriginal female population and Aboriginal male population. Wherever possible, information is provided for First Nations, Métis and Inuit women separately.

    Release date: 2016-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400114094
    Description:

    This article examines the share of adults aged 25 to 65 with a university degree who have lower literacy skills, lower numeracy skills, or both, and the factors most likely to be associated with lower literacy or numeracy skills among university graduates. In this article, individuals with lower literacy and lower numeracy are defined as those who scored at level 2 or below (out of 5 levels) in tests administered to survey respondents who participated in the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC).

    Release date: 2014-11-04

  • Articles and reports: 89-555-X2013001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report presents the first Canadian results of the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC), an initiative of OECD. PIAAC provides internationally comparable measures of three skills that are essential to processing information: literacy, numeracy, and problem-solving in technology-rich environments (referred to as PS-TRE).

    Canada is one of 24 countries and sub-national regions participating in this initiative. A sample of over 27,000 respondents was collected and allows reliable estimation at the national, provincial and territorial level.

    The report provides information about the literacy, numeracy and PS-TRE skills for the Canadian population aged 16 to 65. It provides results for Canada as a whole, as well as for all the provinces and territories. In addition, it looks at the relationships between skills proficiency and a range of socio-demographic characteristics (e.g., age, gender, level of education) across the entire Canadian population. It also reports on first results on the literacy, numeracy and PS-TRE skills of Aboriginal populations, immigrants, and official-language minority communities.

    Release date: 2013-10-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201200111651
    Description:

    The Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey assessed four foundation skills thought to be essential for social, professional and economic success - prose literacy, document literacy, numeracy and problem solving. Eleven countries, including Canada, participated in the most recent Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey, which was conducted in two main waves between 2002 and 2008.This article summarizes the key findings reported in that report, focusing on problem-solving skills, their definition, distribution in the labour force and related labour market outcomes.

    Release date: 2012-05-01

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800510798
    Description:

    In a recent Statistics Canada study, Aneta Bonikowska, David Green and Craig Riddell (2008) use data from the Canadian component of the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS) to measure the literacy skills of immigrants and the Canadian-born and relate these to earnings outcomes. The analysis takes into account standard demographic information, along with information on where education was obtained and age of migration to further refine their analysis of immigrant/Canadian-born earnings differentials. This article summarizes the results of their research.

    Release date: 2009-03-04

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2008016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Internet's rapid and profound entry into our lives quite understandably makes people wonder how, both individually and collectively, we have been affected by it. When major shifts in technology use occur, utopian and dystopian views of their impact on society often abound, reflecting their disruptiveness and people's concerns. Given its complex uses, the Internet, both as a technology and as an environment, has had both beneficial and deleterious effects. Above all, though, it has had transformative effects.

    Are Canadians becoming more isolated, more reclusive and less integrated in their communities as they use the Internet? Or, are they becoming more participatory and more integrated in their communities? In addition, do these communities still resemble traditional communities, or are they becoming more like social networks than cohesive groups?

    To address these questions, this article organizes, analyzes and presents existing Canadian evidence. It uses survey results and research amassed by Statistics Canada and the Connected Lives project in Toronto to explore the role of the Internet in social engagement and the opportunities it represents for Canadians to be active citizens. It finds that Internet users are at least as socially engaged as non-users. They have large networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend somewhat less in-person time and, of course, more time online. An appreciable number of Internet users are civically and politically engaged, using the Internet to find out about opportunities and make contact with others.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008068
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using major Statistics Canada data sources related to the education and training of Canadians, this publication presents a jurisdictional view of what we currently know on educating health workers to begin to address some critical questions facing Canadians today: Does Canada have enough interested individuals with the right skills who want to work in health? Does it have the infrastructure, capacity, and effective education system to ensure an adequate supply of health workers to meet future health care demands?

    As such, this report reveals some important information about what happens before, during and after health education. It focuses on interest in health occupations, the number of students taking and graduating from postsecondary health programs along with their socio-demographic characteristics and those of the faculty teaching these programs, the labour market experiences of recent graduates from these programs - including their mobility after graduation - as well as the ongoing participation of health workers in formal and informal training.

    Release date: 2008-10-10
Journals and periodicals (15)

Journals and periodicals (15) (0 to 10 of 15 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-599-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The fact sheets in this series provide an "at-a-glance" overview of particular aspects of education in Canada and summarize key data trends in selected tables published as part of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP).

    The PCEIP mission is to publish a set of statistical measures on education systems in Canada for policy makers, practitioners and the general public to monitor the performance of education systems across jurisdictions and over time. PCEIP is a joint venture of Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC).

    Release date: 2018-10-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-555-X
    Description:

    The Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC), an initiative of OECD, provides internationally comparable measures of three skills that are essential to processing information: literacy, numeracy, and problem-solving in technology-rich environments (referred to as PS-TRE). Canada is one of 24 countries and sub-national regions participating in this initiative. This study aims to provide a picture of the competencies of the Canadian population aged 16 to 65 in all three skill domains.

    Release date: 2013-10-18

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-604-X
    Description:

    Literacy for Life, is the second report from the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey. It presents additional results on the nature and magnitude of the literacy gaps faced by OECD countries and how these gaps have evolved over the medium term.

    It offers new insights into the factors that influence the formation of adult skills in various settings - at home and at work - for the eleven countries participating in the first and last round of data collection between 2003 and 2008. The study offers comparative evidence on the impact of various factors on the supply of skill. The study offers a special focus on numeracy skills and problem solving skills. It explores the relationships between numeracy and key socio-demographic factors as well as labour market outcomes and earnings.

    It highlights the importance of problem solving skills by defining this foundational skill and by exploring its determinants as well as its relative role in influencing important labour market outcomes.

    The report offers also an analysis of performance across multiple skill domains. It investigates the skill profiles of various population groups defined in terms of the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of those who score at levels deemed to be low in one or more skill domains and explores the resulting consequences.

    The report concludes by investigating the issue of skill mismatch in the labour market and its relationship to adult learning. The extent and distribution of mismatch between the day to day literacy related requirements of workers and the literacy skills they have obtained is an important issue that is being explored in this study.

    Release date: 2011-12-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-552-M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) was a seven-country initiative conducted in the fall of 1994. Its goal was to create comparable literacy profiles across national, linguistic and cultural boundaries. Successive waves of the survey now encompass close to 30 countries around the world. This monograph series features detailed studies from the IALS database by literacy scholars and experts in Canada and the United States. The research is primarily funded by Human Resources Development Canada. Monographs focus on current policy issues and cover topics such as adult training, literacy skill match and mismatch in the workplace, seniors' literacy skills and health, literacy and economic security, and many others.

    Release date: 2008-07-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-617-X
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    The International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey, undertaken in 2003, measured the proficiencies of a representative sample of Canadian adults aged 16 and over in four domains: prose literacy, document literacy, numeracy and problem solving, and benchmarked performance against an international standard. The proficiency scores are compared between provinces, territories and nations, and over time. Moreover, literacy performance is examined in relation to differences in variables such as educational attainment, employment and unemployment, earnings and self-assessed health. Analyses of the literacy performance of groups of special interest, including women and men, young adults and seniors, recent and established immigrants, and Aboriginal populations are included.

    Release date: 2005-11-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-603-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    "Learning a living: First results of the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey" presents new evidence on the nature and magnitude of the literacy gaps faced by OECD countries and how these gaps have evolved over the medium term.

    The fundamental goal of the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL) is to shed new light on the twin processes of skill gain and loss. The survey is sponsored by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

    The report offers new insights into the factors that influence the formation and loss of adult skills in various settings - at home and at work - for the seven countries participating in the first round of data collection. The study offers the first comparative evidence on the impact of formal adult education and informal learning on the supply of skill. It also provides unique insight into the distribution of information and communication technology skills, and how these have amplified both productivity and wage inequality.

    It is meant to assist decision makers in formulating policy in four areas:-Policies aimed at removing skill deficits that act as barriers to innovation, productivity and high rates of economic growth;-Policies designed to limit and reverse social exclusion and income inequality; -Policies that seek to reduce the unit cost of delivering public health care and education services;-Policies conceived to improve quality in all spheres, from public services to quality of life, individual fulfillment and happiness.

    Release date: 2005-05-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-574-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) was a 22-country study conducted between 1994 and 1998. In every country nationally representative samples of adults aged 16-65 were interviewed and assessed at home. The goals of the survey were to create comparable literacy profiles across national, linguistic and cultural boundaries and to study the factors that influence literacy proficiency. One factor in particular was singled out for attention, namely the role of adult education and training in improving literacy skills and wider labor market outcomes. The monograph series includes studies by literacy scholars and experts drawing on the IALS database. This particular monograph was funded by the United States Department of Education, Office of Vocational and Adult Education, Division of Adult Education and Literacy. Other studies in the series were funded primarily by Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada.

    Today the capacity of labor markets, firms and individuals to adjust to change, improve productivity and capitalize on technological innovation depends in large measure on the skills of the adult population. Improving the stock of skills available to the economy through investment in adult education and workplace learning is therefore an issue of considerable strategic importance.

    This monograph presents 15 international indicators that allow readers to compare the volume of adult education participation in North America with that of other advanced industrialized nations. The data offer a comparative snapshot of the total adult education effort as well as the social distribution of adult education opportunities in the mid to late 1990s. The findings generally suggest that both Canada and the United States have mature adult education and training markets. However, the findings also indicate that there are major differences among countries in who gets trained, and how much. On most measures North America finds itself in an average position, ahead of emerging economies but behind the Nordic countries.

    Release date: 2001-09-07

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-586-X
    Description:

    In today's emerging knowledge societies, the capacity of labour markets, firms and individuals to adjust to change, improve productivity and capitalize on technological innovation depends in large measure on the skills of the adult population. Improving the stock of skills available to the economy through investment in adult education and workplace learning has therefore become an issue of considerable strategic importance. But how are the Canadian markets for adult education and training evolving?

    This report presents, for the first time, evidence on the development of adult education and training in Canada during the last decade. Examined are not only broad trends in the demand and supply of adult education, but also the factors contributing to observed developments. Survey data collected in 1998 allow readers to gauge the current situation and make comparisons over time and across Canadian provinces. The findings indicate, first, that growth in adult education participation has slowed in recent years, and second, that there are major differences between the provinces in who gets trained, and how much.

    Release date: 2001-05-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 89F0125X
    Description:

    These highlights provide a brief summary of the report 'Literacy, numeracy and labour market outcomes in Canada', (catalogue no. 89-552-MPE00008 and 89-552-MIE00008) which investigates the relationship between labour market success and literacy skills.

    Release date: 2001-03-19

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-572-X
    Description:

    The International Adult Literacy Survey was a 22-country initiative conducted between 1994 and 1998. In every country nationally representative samples of adults aged 16-65 were interviewed and tested at home, using the same literacy test. The main purpose of the survey was to find out how well adults use information to function in society. Another aim was to investigate the factors that influence literacy proficiency and to compare these between countries.

    This monograph presents 10 international indicators that allow readers to compare the literacy proficiency of Americans with that of other populations. The findings confirm that low literacy is an important issue in all regions and countries surveyed.

    Release date: 2001-02-08
Date modified: