Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (74) (0 to 10 of 74 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2009002
    Description:

    This working paper highlights a variety of aspects of innovation in the Canadian manufacturing sector, including incidence and types of innovation, novelty of innovation, innovation activities, sources of information contributing to innovation, cooperation with innovation partners, impacts of innovation, obstacles to innovation, use of government programs, intellectual property protection, and suppliers to innovative manufacturing plants.

    Release date: 2009-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200900110849
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article explores differences in characteristics of innovative and non-innovative manufacturing plants in Canada using results from the Survey of Innovation (SOI) 2005. It finds that innovative plants are more likely than non-innovators to be large, to have employees with higher education credentials, to engage in research and development (R&D) and marketing activities and to have full-time R&D employees. Innovative plants are also more likely to receive external funding, to export and import, to use both formal and informal methods of intellectual property protection, and to have differences in how they rate the importance of success factors.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800210741
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Innovation commercialization, the process of introducing a new or significantly improved product to market, is an important innovation activity for a plant and is the final stage in new product development. Without successful commercialization, innovations may not return any benefits for a plant's innovation efforts. The Survey of Innovation 2005 asked innovative manufacturing plants questions related to commercialization activities and provides information on the type of these activities being undertaken. Market success is measured in terms of the share of revenues in 2004 from product innovations introduced during the years 2002 to 2004.

    Release date: 2008-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2008001
    Description:

    This study compares the characteristics of innovative exporting firms using formal intellectual property (IP) regimes and those using informal intellectual property regimes. Two service industry groups are examined: Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Selected Professional, Scientific and Technical Services. The data are based on the 2003 Survey of Innovation

    Release date: 2008-02-29

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2007007
    Description:

    Results from the Survey of Innovation 2003 raised some interesting questions. First, an unexpected one-third of establishments in R&D services were not innovative. According to the guidelines of the Oslo Manual, innovative establishments are those that introduced a new or significantly improved product or process on to the market or into production, within a specified interval. Second, many of these non-innovative establishments indicated that satisfying existing customers was irrelevant to their firms success. This was very different response from all other types of firms.

    This working paper provides a potential explanation of these unexpected results, as well as an overview of available information on establishments in R&D services (NAICS 5417) in the context of professional services generally. The paper assembles descriptive data to show that non-innovative establishments in R&D services differ significantly from other non-innovative establishments and, while not innovative, they are nevertheless highly inventive. It presents some evidence to suggest that they are venture firms (firms relying on infusions of investment capital rather than revenues from sales to sustain their operations) and proposes a specific set of indicators that would facilitate resolution of the nature of firms in this industry group.

    Release date: 2007-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210316
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The most recent Statistics Canada Survey of Innovation (2005) distinguished five types of innovation. The questions on types of innovation were redesigned in response to the 1997 revision of the Oslo Manual, which incorporated new insights on innovation in the service industries, and broadened the concept of process innovation to include not only production processes but also methods of product delivery. This article examines the five different types of innovation in Canadian manufacturing establishments and industry groups.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210317
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article summarizes the findings of an econometric study using data from the 2005 Canadian Survey of Innovation. The study looked at the decision of firms in the Canadian manufacturing sector to co-operate on innovation projects. The analysis reveals that the factors influencing the decision to co-operate in order to access external knowledge are very similar to those influencing cost-sharing motives. It also finds that public funding leads firms to co-operate in order to access external knowledge and research and development (R&D).

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210322
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article sheds light on selected characteristics of firms, both innovators and non-innovators that participated in a global supply chain. Using results from the Survey of Innovation 2005, four indicators of global supply chain participation are explored: sales; source of raw materials and components; source of new machinery and equipment; and contracting out of R&D services.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210330
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Recent improvements in information and communications technologies (ICTs), coupled with the rise of new global players such as China and India, have enabled firms to outsource a growing share of their activities. This has allowed them to benefit from cost savings and to focus on their core competencies. While domestic and foreign outsourcing of certain manufacturing functions have been prevalent for decades, only recently has the trend extended significantly to services such as legal, accounting, data entry, and research and development (R&D).

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019619
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2005 Survey of Innovation asked innovative manufacturing establishments questions related to how they acquired knowledge and technology for innovation and from whom. This article analyzes the two thirds of manufacturing establishments that were innovative that is they introduced a new or significantly improved product or process during the three reference years, 2002 to 2004 and sheds light on their purchase of knowledge and technology, the importance of information sources, and their collaborative partners.

    Release date: 2007-05-10
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Articles and reports (74)

Articles and reports (74) (0 to 10 of 74 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2009002
    Description:

    This working paper highlights a variety of aspects of innovation in the Canadian manufacturing sector, including incidence and types of innovation, novelty of innovation, innovation activities, sources of information contributing to innovation, cooperation with innovation partners, impacts of innovation, obstacles to innovation, use of government programs, intellectual property protection, and suppliers to innovative manufacturing plants.

    Release date: 2009-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200900110849
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article explores differences in characteristics of innovative and non-innovative manufacturing plants in Canada using results from the Survey of Innovation (SOI) 2005. It finds that innovative plants are more likely than non-innovators to be large, to have employees with higher education credentials, to engage in research and development (R&D) and marketing activities and to have full-time R&D employees. Innovative plants are also more likely to receive external funding, to export and import, to use both formal and informal methods of intellectual property protection, and to have differences in how they rate the importance of success factors.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800210741
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Innovation commercialization, the process of introducing a new or significantly improved product to market, is an important innovation activity for a plant and is the final stage in new product development. Without successful commercialization, innovations may not return any benefits for a plant's innovation efforts. The Survey of Innovation 2005 asked innovative manufacturing plants questions related to commercialization activities and provides information on the type of these activities being undertaken. Market success is measured in terms of the share of revenues in 2004 from product innovations introduced during the years 2002 to 2004.

    Release date: 2008-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2008001
    Description:

    This study compares the characteristics of innovative exporting firms using formal intellectual property (IP) regimes and those using informal intellectual property regimes. Two service industry groups are examined: Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Selected Professional, Scientific and Technical Services. The data are based on the 2003 Survey of Innovation

    Release date: 2008-02-29

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2007007
    Description:

    Results from the Survey of Innovation 2003 raised some interesting questions. First, an unexpected one-third of establishments in R&D services were not innovative. According to the guidelines of the Oslo Manual, innovative establishments are those that introduced a new or significantly improved product or process on to the market or into production, within a specified interval. Second, many of these non-innovative establishments indicated that satisfying existing customers was irrelevant to their firms success. This was very different response from all other types of firms.

    This working paper provides a potential explanation of these unexpected results, as well as an overview of available information on establishments in R&D services (NAICS 5417) in the context of professional services generally. The paper assembles descriptive data to show that non-innovative establishments in R&D services differ significantly from other non-innovative establishments and, while not innovative, they are nevertheless highly inventive. It presents some evidence to suggest that they are venture firms (firms relying on infusions of investment capital rather than revenues from sales to sustain their operations) and proposes a specific set of indicators that would facilitate resolution of the nature of firms in this industry group.

    Release date: 2007-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210316
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The most recent Statistics Canada Survey of Innovation (2005) distinguished five types of innovation. The questions on types of innovation were redesigned in response to the 1997 revision of the Oslo Manual, which incorporated new insights on innovation in the service industries, and broadened the concept of process innovation to include not only production processes but also methods of product delivery. This article examines the five different types of innovation in Canadian manufacturing establishments and industry groups.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210317
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article summarizes the findings of an econometric study using data from the 2005 Canadian Survey of Innovation. The study looked at the decision of firms in the Canadian manufacturing sector to co-operate on innovation projects. The analysis reveals that the factors influencing the decision to co-operate in order to access external knowledge are very similar to those influencing cost-sharing motives. It also finds that public funding leads firms to co-operate in order to access external knowledge and research and development (R&D).

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210322
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article sheds light on selected characteristics of firms, both innovators and non-innovators that participated in a global supply chain. Using results from the Survey of Innovation 2005, four indicators of global supply chain participation are explored: sales; source of raw materials and components; source of new machinery and equipment; and contracting out of R&D services.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210330
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Recent improvements in information and communications technologies (ICTs), coupled with the rise of new global players such as China and India, have enabled firms to outsource a growing share of their activities. This has allowed them to benefit from cost savings and to focus on their core competencies. While domestic and foreign outsourcing of certain manufacturing functions have been prevalent for decades, only recently has the trend extended significantly to services such as legal, accounting, data entry, and research and development (R&D).

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019619
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2005 Survey of Innovation asked innovative manufacturing establishments questions related to how they acquired knowledge and technology for innovation and from whom. This article analyzes the two thirds of manufacturing establishments that were innovative that is they introduced a new or significantly improved product or process during the three reference years, 2002 to 2004 and sheds light on their purchase of knowledge and technology, the importance of information sources, and their collaborative partners.

    Release date: 2007-05-10
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