Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (826) (0 to 10 of 826 results)

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X202300100001
    Description: With the emergence of COVID-19, Canadian governments at all levels adopted policy initiatives to address the financial challenges faced by businesses. The policies were broad in both scope and variety and altogether represented billions of dollars in support.

    This article examines these programs including the characteristics of recipients using preliminary data from the Canadian COVID-19 Business Support Measures Database (CCBSM), a standardized set of data covering government support programs for businesses.

    Release date: 2023-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2023001
    Description:

    This paper provides an update to the work of Abbes et al. (2022a) and to the Canadian Patent Research Database (CPRD). The CPRD was created to study patenting, an important indicator of innovative activity, at the micro level.

    Release date: 2023-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202201200004
    Description: In recent years, Statistics Canada has released data and analysis on business ownership by women and persons with disabilities. Furthermore, in an effort to continue to fill the information gap on business ownership by employment equity groups and better inform policy making, Statistics Canada has released, for the first time, time series on Indigenous-owned businesses by sex of ownership and other characteristics such as age of primary owner and province of operation.
    Release date: 2022-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202201200004
    Description:

    Canada’s COVID-19 vaccination campaign began on December 14, 2020 with the arrival of a limited number of doses which were prioritized for high-risk populations, such as the elderly, residents and staff of congregate living settings, frontline healthcare workers, and Indigenous populations. Using data from the COVID-19 Vaccination Coverage Survey (CVCS), this study’s objective was to examine sociodemographic disparities in COVID-19 vaccination uptake and intent by identifying the social and economic determinants associated with vaccination uptake among seniors aged 60 years and older (i.e., those eligible for vaccination at the time of the survey) and the determinants of vaccination intent in the entire adult population.

    Release date: 2022-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2022007
    Description:

    This discussion paper introduces three income inequality indicators and presents estimates obtained by applying these indicators to the Canadian Income Survey (CIS) data using the 2018-base MBM methodology. It provides the opportunity to gage the interest of including these three indicators into the current suite of income inequality indicators to facilitate the analysis of existing disparities and obstacles to income equality.

    Release date: 2022-12-20

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2022087
    Description:

    Physical flow accounts (PFA) record the annual flows of natural resources, products and residuals between the Canadian economy and the environment. The Water Account describes the use of the natural resource input of water and of water accessed through municipal water supply or irrigation systems by industries, governments, institutions, and households.

    Release date: 2022-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202200200001
    Description:

    Conceptual arguments and examples are presented suggesting that the Bayesian approach to survey inference can address the many and varied challenges of survey analysis. Bayesian models that incorporate features of the complex design can yield inferences that are relevant for the specific data set obtained, but also have good repeated-sampling properties. Examples focus on the role of auxiliary variables and sampling weights, and methods for handling nonresponse. The article offers ten top reasons for favoring the Bayesian approach to survey inference.

    Release date: 2022-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202200200005
    Description:

    Strong assumptions are required to make inferences about a finite population from a nonprobability sample. Statistics from a nonprobability sample should be accompanied by evidence that the assumptions are met and that point estimates and confidence intervals are fit for use. I describe some diagnostics that can be used to assess the model assumptions, and discuss issues to consider when deciding whether to use data from a nonprobability sample.

    Release date: 2022-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202200200009
    Description:

    Multiple imputation (MI) is a popular approach for dealing with missing data arising from non-response in sample surveys. Multiple imputation by chained equations (MICE) is one of the most widely used MI algorithms for multivariate data, but it lacks theoretical foundation and is computationally intensive. Recently, missing data imputation methods based on deep learning models have been developed with encouraging results in small studies. However, there has been limited research on evaluating their performance in realistic settings compared to MICE, particularly in big surveys. We conduct extensive simulation studies based on a subsample of the American Community Survey to compare the repeated sampling properties of four machine learning based MI methods: MICE with classification trees, MICE with random forests, generative adversarial imputation networks, and multiple imputation using denoising autoencoders. We find the deep learning imputation methods are superior to MICE in terms of computational time. However, with the default choice of hyperparameters in the common software packages, MICE with classification trees consistently outperforms, often by a large margin, the deep learning imputation methods in terms of bias, mean squared error, and coverage under a range of realistic settings.

    Release date: 2022-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2022021
    Description:

    A variety of different factors impact the ability of Canadian businesses to operate, such as the geographical location of businesses, the industry the businesses operate in, and the size of businesses. Differences may also be apparent when looking at different categories of business owners, as different segments of the Canadian population face different challenges at a personal level, and as owners of businesses. From the beginning of October to early November 2022, Statistics Canada conducted the Canadian Survey on Business Conditions (CSBC) to collect information on the environment businesses are currently operating in and their expectations moving forward. This article explores results from the survey by looking at the businesses majority-owned by immigrants to Canada and businesses majority-owned by racialized persons. While there is some degree of crossover between these two sub-populations, they are two distinct groups and face different challenges. The information and trends presented in this article are based on data collected via the CSBC.

    Release date: 2022-12-15
Stats in brief (74)

Stats in brief (74) (0 to 10 of 74 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2022087
    Description:

    Physical flow accounts (PFA) record the annual flows of natural resources, products and residuals between the Canadian economy and the environment. The Water Account describes the use of the natural resource input of water and of water accessed through municipal water supply or irrigation systems by industries, governments, institutions, and households.

    Release date: 2022-12-19

  • Stats in brief: 45-20-00032022007
    Description:

    Canada is facing both a climate crisis and a housing crisis, and they are interconnected.

    Choices we make about our homes impact the environment: their location and how much we need to use a car to get around, the heat source that they use, the materials used in their construction.

    At the same time, the climate impacts our homes: when severe weather strikes and causes damage to our homes, we have no choice but to rebuild, and even if we escape unscathed, we still have to decide how much to change our lifestyles to adapt to a changing climate.

    Andrew DeFazio, CMHC Climate Change Advisor, joins us to explore how we can climate-proof our housing strategy and home-proof our climate strategy.

    Release date: 2022-11-22

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2022072
    Description:

    This infographic presents information on passenger vehicle fatalities collected from the Canadian Coroner and Medical Examiner Database. This infographic illustrates demographic profile of the deceased such as sex and age. The product also summarizes information on select circumstances surrounding passenger vehicle fatalities.

    Release date: 2022-11-18

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2022068
    Description:

    This infographic details the food supply chain by focusing on the price movements for wheat-based food products in March 2022, and the costs to move food products from producers to consumers.

    Release date: 2022-11-16

  • Stats in brief: 45-20-00032022006
    Description:

    It used to be that Statistics Canada didn’t measure poverty. Not exactly. Poverty is complex, and there wasn't a single definition that everyone agreed on. So while StatCan did measure low income and other income inequality indicators, it didn't measure poverty per se. That is, until 2018, when the government chose to use the Market Basket Measure, or MBM, as Canada's Official Poverty Line. That means that the government now uses the MBM to track its poverty reduction targets.

    But something strange happened during the pandemic: in 2020 the poverty rate fell. And it fell quite a bit. In fact, the poverty rate dropped in one year almost as much as it had in the four preceding years.

    But why? What happened? Will the poverty rate continue to fall? And what happens if it hits zero? How would health outcomes change? Education outcomes? People's general happiness and well-being?

    Has there ever been a time and place in Canada where the poverty rate was zero? The closest may be the Mincome Experiment of the 1970s in Manitoba. Many Canadians have never heard of this guaranteed income experiment, but it offers a glimpse at what eliminating poverty might look like.

    To learn more we spoke with Burton Burton Gustajtis an economist from Statistics Canada, Evelyn Forget, a Professor of Economics and Community Health Sciences at the University of Manitoba and Kevin Milligan, a Professor of Economics in the Vancouver School of Economics at the University of British Columbia.

    Release date: 2022-10-17

  • Stats in brief: 45-20-00032022005
    Description:

    Sylvia Ostry was appointed Canada’s first and only female Chief Statistician in 1972, but she didn’t get there by playing by the rules. She was ambitious but grew up in a world where many thought that it was shameful to be female and have a career.

    Ostry was a Jewish woman in economics and, even after she earned a Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge, she was denied a job with the United Nations because of her gender. Nevertheless, she had a storied career, becoming the Chairman of the Economic Council of Canada then the Chief Economist at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). But we're not focusing on her career highlights. We're going behind the scenes to look at how she challenged herself to succeed, becoming both a respected economist and mother, and how she handled setbacks and discrimination while staying true to herself and demonstrating the integrity for which she's remembered today.

    We’re celebrating the 50th anniversary of Sylvia Ostry’s appointment as Chief Statistician. In this episode of Eh Sayers, featuring interviews with her sons, Adam Ostry and Jonathan Ostry, we are pleased to introduce you to this remarkable woman and to share with you eight pieces of advice inspired by her life.

    Release date: 2022-10-07

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202200100005
    Description:

    Using data from the General Social Survey, a new study entitled "The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on the Religiosity of Canadians" examines changes in rates of religious affiliation, frequency of participation in group and individual religious activities, and involvement with religious organizations between 2015 and 2020.

    Release date: 2022-07-18

  • Stats in brief: 11-621-M2022012
    Description:

    Using administrative data, such as goods and services tax (GST) revenue, this study assesses how the recovery began to unfold in selected service industries in 2021, the second year of the pandemic, even as supply chain disruptions, labour shortages, skill gaps and inflationary pressures intensified.

    Release date: 2022-07-18

  • Stats in brief: 11-621-M2022011
    Description:

    Signs of a tightening labour market in Canada have been growing amid elevated labour demand. Based on the results from the Canadian Survey of Business Conditions, this article provides insights on labour related challenges faced by businesses across Canada and how these businesses plan to move forward in light of these challenges. Shortage of labour force, recruiting skilled employees, and retaining skilled employees are leading obstacles businesses expect to face in the short term. In response to these challenges, many businesses plan to have management and current employees to work more hours to address these labour obstacles.

    Release date: 2022-06-23

  • Stats in brief: 11-621-M2022009
    Description:

    Canadian businesses face many different obstacles in their day to day operations. Several factors such as size, industry of operation and region of operation can cause businesses to experience different obstacles affecting their ability to sell to their markets. The obstacles experienced by businesses owned by different segments of the population can also vary. The challenges of businesses majority-owned by women are illustrated within this article. It involves an examination of the data produced by the Canadian Survey on Business Conditions.

    Release date: 2022-06-09
Articles and reports (739)

Articles and reports (739) (0 to 10 of 739 results)

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X202300100001
    Description: With the emergence of COVID-19, Canadian governments at all levels adopted policy initiatives to address the financial challenges faced by businesses. The policies were broad in both scope and variety and altogether represented billions of dollars in support.

    This article examines these programs including the characteristics of recipients using preliminary data from the Canadian COVID-19 Business Support Measures Database (CCBSM), a standardized set of data covering government support programs for businesses.

    Release date: 2023-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2023001
    Description:

    This paper provides an update to the work of Abbes et al. (2022a) and to the Canadian Patent Research Database (CPRD). The CPRD was created to study patenting, an important indicator of innovative activity, at the micro level.

    Release date: 2023-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202201200004
    Description: In recent years, Statistics Canada has released data and analysis on business ownership by women and persons with disabilities. Furthermore, in an effort to continue to fill the information gap on business ownership by employment equity groups and better inform policy making, Statistics Canada has released, for the first time, time series on Indigenous-owned businesses by sex of ownership and other characteristics such as age of primary owner and province of operation.
    Release date: 2022-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202201200004
    Description:

    Canada’s COVID-19 vaccination campaign began on December 14, 2020 with the arrival of a limited number of doses which were prioritized for high-risk populations, such as the elderly, residents and staff of congregate living settings, frontline healthcare workers, and Indigenous populations. Using data from the COVID-19 Vaccination Coverage Survey (CVCS), this study’s objective was to examine sociodemographic disparities in COVID-19 vaccination uptake and intent by identifying the social and economic determinants associated with vaccination uptake among seniors aged 60 years and older (i.e., those eligible for vaccination at the time of the survey) and the determinants of vaccination intent in the entire adult population.

    Release date: 2022-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2022007
    Description:

    This discussion paper introduces three income inequality indicators and presents estimates obtained by applying these indicators to the Canadian Income Survey (CIS) data using the 2018-base MBM methodology. It provides the opportunity to gage the interest of including these three indicators into the current suite of income inequality indicators to facilitate the analysis of existing disparities and obstacles to income equality.

    Release date: 2022-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202200200001
    Description:

    Conceptual arguments and examples are presented suggesting that the Bayesian approach to survey inference can address the many and varied challenges of survey analysis. Bayesian models that incorporate features of the complex design can yield inferences that are relevant for the specific data set obtained, but also have good repeated-sampling properties. Examples focus on the role of auxiliary variables and sampling weights, and methods for handling nonresponse. The article offers ten top reasons for favoring the Bayesian approach to survey inference.

    Release date: 2022-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202200200005
    Description:

    Strong assumptions are required to make inferences about a finite population from a nonprobability sample. Statistics from a nonprobability sample should be accompanied by evidence that the assumptions are met and that point estimates and confidence intervals are fit for use. I describe some diagnostics that can be used to assess the model assumptions, and discuss issues to consider when deciding whether to use data from a nonprobability sample.

    Release date: 2022-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202200200009
    Description:

    Multiple imputation (MI) is a popular approach for dealing with missing data arising from non-response in sample surveys. Multiple imputation by chained equations (MICE) is one of the most widely used MI algorithms for multivariate data, but it lacks theoretical foundation and is computationally intensive. Recently, missing data imputation methods based on deep learning models have been developed with encouraging results in small studies. However, there has been limited research on evaluating their performance in realistic settings compared to MICE, particularly in big surveys. We conduct extensive simulation studies based on a subsample of the American Community Survey to compare the repeated sampling properties of four machine learning based MI methods: MICE with classification trees, MICE with random forests, generative adversarial imputation networks, and multiple imputation using denoising autoencoders. We find the deep learning imputation methods are superior to MICE in terms of computational time. However, with the default choice of hyperparameters in the common software packages, MICE with classification trees consistently outperforms, often by a large margin, the deep learning imputation methods in terms of bias, mean squared error, and coverage under a range of realistic settings.

    Release date: 2022-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2022021
    Description:

    A variety of different factors impact the ability of Canadian businesses to operate, such as the geographical location of businesses, the industry the businesses operate in, and the size of businesses. Differences may also be apparent when looking at different categories of business owners, as different segments of the Canadian population face different challenges at a personal level, and as owners of businesses. From the beginning of October to early November 2022, Statistics Canada conducted the Canadian Survey on Business Conditions (CSBC) to collect information on the environment businesses are currently operating in and their expectations moving forward. This article explores results from the survey by looking at the businesses majority-owned by immigrants to Canada and businesses majority-owned by racialized persons. While there is some degree of crossover between these two sub-populations, they are two distinct groups and face different challenges. The information and trends presented in this article are based on data collected via the CSBC.

    Release date: 2022-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2022017
    Description:

    This study provides the first socioeconomic profile of immigrant women board directors and officers in Canada from an intersectional lens. Linking data from the Corporations Returns Act with those from the Longitudinal Immigration database, exploratory estimates are presented. The study analyzes characteristics of immigrants at admission and disparities in family, work and income characteristics, mainly by gender and immigrant status. Further, it informs on the types of businesses in which diverse women executives contribute to corporate governance and strategic decision making.

    Release date: 2022-12-08
Journals and periodicals (13)

Journals and periodicals (13) (0 to 10 of 13 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-655-X
    Description:

    Many of the 60 or so Aboriginal languages in Canada are considered endangered to varying degrees for their long-term survival. Assessing language vitality or endangerment through the measurement of various factors can provide useful information to help ensure the continuity of a language. This paper illustrates how the 2011 Census of Population and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) can be used to measure some of the factors that provide information related to the vitality of Aboriginal languages.

    Release date: 2014-10-16

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-651-X
    Description:

    This article presents employment and unemployment rates, and some information regarding salaries and industrial sectors of employees, for official-language minorities. These data are based on the Labour Force Survey and enable comparisons between official-language minority and majority according to their situation in the labour market for provinces or groups of provinces.

    Release date: 2012-11-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-222-X
    Description:

    This annual publication is based on the Survey of Intellectual Property Commercialization in the Higher Education Sector which tracks the progress of innovation in this area.

    The objective of the survey is to assure the availability of pertinent information to monitor science and technology related activities and to support the development of science and technology policy. The topic studied is intellectual property management at universities and affiliated teaching hospitals. The data are used to determine how to maximize the benefits resulting from public sector research. Data users include the federal and provincial governments and university administrators and researchers.

    Release date: 2010-08-23

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-542-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report offers highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering, and Participating (CSGVP) which was undertaken to better understand how Canadians support individuals and communities on their own or through their involvement with charitable and non-profit organizations. For this survey, thousands of Canadians aged 15 and over were asked how they: gave money and other resources to individuals and to organizations; volunteered time to help others and to enhance their communities; and participated in the practices which help give substance to active citizenship. The results from this survey allow this report to tell a story about who Canada's volunteers and charitable donors are and the ways in which they contribute to our society.

    Release date: 2009-06-08

  • Journals and periodicals: 61-533-X
    Description:

    This publication provides the first national portrait of the many thousands of nonprofit and voluntary organizations found in every Canadian community. The data, from the National Survey of Nonprofit and Voluntary Organizations, reveal a set of organizations that are widely diverse in nature, touching virtually every aspect of Canadians' lives.

    Release date: 2005-06-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 61-533-S
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This booklet summarizes the key results of the first National Survey of Nonprofit and Voluntary Organizations. These organizations have a significant economic presence and serve as vehicles for citizen engagement. However, many report significant challenges to their capacity to fulfill their missions.

    Release date: 2005-03-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-593-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    The Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) was developed by Statistics Canada in partnership with the Department of Canadian Heritage in order to provide new and important information on the ethnic and cultural background of people in Canada and how it relates to their lives in Canada today.

    The survey followed the 2001 Census with the census providing the frame for the sample. The target population for the survey was persons aged 15 years or older living in private households in the 10 provinces. The population did not include persons living in collective dwellings, persons living on Indian reserves, persons of Aboriginal origins living off-reserve, or persons living in Northern and remote areas. There was a separate post-censal survey designed for Aboriginal peoples, the Aboriginal Peoples Survey, which was conducted in 2001 and 2002.

    Using the EDS data, this article examines Canada's ethno-cultural mosaic in 2002, providing a portrait of the different generations of Canadians who today make up this country. It also analyses the level of attachment that people in the different generations and ethnic groups have to their own ethno-cultural backgrounds and to the broader Canadian society.

    Release date: 2003-09-29

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-597-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper provides a descriptive analysis of issues related to the access and use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) among Canadian youth. In particular, this research examines the extent to which inequities in the use and access of ICT exist among Canadian high school students, based on gender, socio-economic status and rural-urban location. Three datasets have been used to study this issue: the Canadian portion of the Second International Technology in Education Study (SITES), an international survey which measures schools' use of technological resources; the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), which was conducted in conjunction with the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA); and Cycle 14 of the General Social Survey (GSS), which focusses specifically on issues related to ICT access and use.The results of these analyses suggest that there is a 'digital divide' among Canadian youth, in terms of access to and experience with ICT. Rural youth are less likely to have access to computers in the home; however, frequency of use and perceived competency levels are not compromised by this trend. Female youth and those from families with low levels of parental education are also less likely to have access to computers in their homes. These groups tend to spend less time on the computer and report lower levels of computer skills competency.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-580-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a physical condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered 'Yes' to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 35,000 adults and 8,000 children living in private or collective households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the survey. The data were collected in the fall of 2001.

    This paper focuses on the various supports available for adults with disabilities. These supports include technical aids and devices, assistance with everyday activities, housing modifications and tax credits.

    Release date: 2003-03-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 67-506-X
    Description:

    This publication describes the statistical system used to produce Canada's balance of international payments and international investment position. Each of the accounts of these two statements is described in terms of concepts, data sources, methods and products. The Canadian practice is related to international standards. The publication concludes with a discusion of future challenges to maintain and enhance this statistical system. An extensive glossary is included. Some historical perspective is provided, notably in the Appendices where a summary of time series is provided along with a chronology of events that affected Canada's external sector over the last half of the XXth century. A description of the foundation of statistics is essential to help users in assessing the quality of data.

    Release date: 2000-07-21
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