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  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2009063
    Description:

    This paper highlights the Canadian Tourism Satellite Account (CTSA) developed by Statistics Canada. The CTSA provides an economic measure of the importance of tourism in terms of expenditures, Gross Domestic Product and employment for Canada. It permits a comparison of tourism with other industries within Canada since the concepts and methods used are based on the framework of the Canadian System of National Accounts. The study revealed that tourism is an important part of Canada's well diversified economy. This paper presents the results of the CTSA for reference year 2004.

    This study was prepared by staff of the Research and Development Projects and Analysis Section, Income and Expenditure Accounts Division, Statistics Canada. The study was funded by the Canadian Tourism Commission.

    Release date: 2009-12-24

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900211036
    Description:

    Surveys are frequently required to produce estimates for subpopulations, sometimes for a single subpopulation and sometimes for several subpopulations in addition to the total population. When membership of a rare subpopulation (or domain) can be determined from the sampling frame, selecting the required domain sample size is relatively straightforward. In this case the main issue is the extent of oversampling to employ when survey estimates are required for several domains and for the total population. Sampling and oversampling rare domains whose members cannot be identified in advance present a major challenge. A variety of methods has been used in this situation. In addition to large-scale screening, these methods include disproportionate stratified sampling, two-phase sampling, the use of multiple frames, multiplicity sampling, panel surveys, and the use of multi-purpose surveys. This paper illustrates the application of these methods in a range of social surveys.

    Release date: 2009-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900211038
    Description:

    We examine overcoming the overestimation in using generalized weight share method (GWSM) caused by link nonresponse in indirect sampling. A few adjustment methods incorporating link nonresponse in using GWSM have been constructed for situations both with and without the availability of auxiliary variables. A simulation study on a longitudinal survey is presented using some of the adjustment methods we recommend. The simulation results show that these adjusted GWSMs perform well in reducing both estimation bias and variance. The advancement in bias reduction is significant.

    Release date: 2009-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900211039
    Description:

    Propensity weighting is a procedure to adjust for unit nonresponse in surveys. A form of implementing this procedure consists of dividing the sampling weights by estimates of the probabilities that the sampled units respond to the survey. Typically, these estimates are obtained by fitting parametric models, such as logistic regression. The resulting adjusted estimators may become biased when the specified parametric models are incorrect. To avoid misspecifying such a model, we consider nonparametric estimation of the response probabilities by local polynomial regression. We study the asymptotic properties of the resulting estimator under quasi-randomization. The practical behavior of the proposed nonresponse adjustment approach is evaluated on NHANES data.

    Release date: 2009-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900211040
    Description:

    In this paper a multivariate structural time series model is described that accounts for the panel design of the Dutch Labour Force Survey and is applied to estimate monthly unemployment rates. Compared to the generalized regression estimator, this approach results in a substantial increase of the accuracy due to a reduction of the standard error and the explicit modelling of the bias between the subsequent waves.

    Release date: 2009-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900211041
    Description:

    Estimation of small area (or domain) compositions may suffer from informative missing data, if the probability of missing varies across the categories of interest as well as the small areas. We develop a double mixed modeling approach that combines a random effects mixed model for the underlying complete data with a random effects mixed model of the differential missing-data mechanism. The effect of sampling design can be incorporated through a quasi-likelihood sampling model. The associated conditional mean squared error of prediction is approximated in terms of a three-part decomposition, corresponding to a naive prediction variance, a positive correction that accounts for the hypothetical parameter estimation uncertainty based on the latent complete data, and another positive correction for the extra variation due to the missing data. We illustrate our approach with an application to the estimation of Municipality household compositions based on the Norwegian register household data, which suffer from informative under-registration of the dwelling identity number.

    Release date: 2009-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900211042
    Description:

    This paper proposes an approach for small area prediction based on data obtained from periodic surveys and censuses. We apply our approach to obtain population predictions for the municipalities not sampled in the Brazilian annual Household Survey (PNAD), as well as to increase the precision of the design-based estimates obtained for the sampled municipalities. In addition to the data provided by the PNAD, we use census demographic data from 1991 and 2000, as well as a complete population count conducted in 1996. Hierarchically non-structured and spatially structured growth models that gain strength from all the sampled municipalities are proposed and compared.

    Release date: 2009-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900211043
    Description:

    Business surveys often use a one-stage stratified simple random sampling without replacement design with some certainty strata. Although weight adjustment is typically applied for unit nonresponse, the variability due to nonresponse may be omitted in practice when estimating variances. This is problematic especially when there are certainty strata. We derive some variance estimators that are consistent when the number of sampled units in each weighting cell is large, using the jackknife, linearization, and modified jackknife methods. The derived variance estimators are first applied to empirical data from the Annual Capital Expenditures Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau and are then examined in a simulation study.

    Release date: 2009-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900211044
    Description:

    In large scaled sample surveys it is common practice to employ stratified multistage designs where units are selected using simple random sampling without replacement at each stage. Variance estimation for these types of designs can be quite cumbersome to implement, particularly for non-linear estimators. Various bootstrap methods for variance estimation have been proposed, but most of these are restricted to single-stage designs or two-stage cluster designs. An extension of the rescaled bootstrap method (Rao and Wu 1988) to stratified multistage designs is proposed which can easily be extended to any number of stages. The proposed method is suitable for a wide range of reweighting techniques, including the general class of calibration estimators. A Monte Carlo simulation study was conducted to examine the performance of the proposed multistage rescaled bootstrap variance estimator.

    Release date: 2009-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900211045
    Description:

    In analysis of sample survey data, degrees-of-freedom quantities are often used to assess the stability of design-based variance estimators. For example, these degrees-of-freedom values are used in construction of confidence intervals based on t distribution approximations; and of related t tests. In addition, a small degrees-of-freedom term provides a qualitative indication of the possible limitations of a given variance estimator in a specific application. Degrees-of-freedom calculations sometimes are based on forms of the Satterthwaite approximation. These Satterthwaite-based calculations depend primarily on the relative magnitudes of stratum-level variances. However, for designs involving a small number of primary units selected per stratum, standard stratum-level variance estimators provide limited information on the true stratum variances. For such cases, customary Satterthwaite-based calculations can be problematic, especially in analyses for subpopulations that are concentrated in a relatively small number of strata. To address this problem, this paper uses estimated within-primary-sample-unit (within PSU) variances to provide auxiliary information regarding the relative magnitudes of the overall stratum-level variances. Analytic results indicate that the resulting degrees-of-freedom estimator will be better than modified Satterthwaite-type estimators provided: (a) the overall stratum-level variances are approximately proportional to the corresponding within-stratum variances; and (b) the variances of the within-PSU variance estimators are relatively small. In addition, this paper develops errors-in-variables methods that can be used to check conditions (a) and (b) empirically. For these model checks, we develop simulation-based reference distributions, which differ substantially from reference distributions based on customary large-sample normal approximations. The proposed methods are applied to four variables from the U.S. Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III).

    Release date: 2009-12-23
Stats in brief (22)

Stats in brief (22) (0 to 10 of 22 results)

  • Stats in brief: 81-599-X2009004
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides information on the proportion of the school-age population - defined as children and youth aged 5 to 24 - living in low-income circumstances, including the duration of low-income spells, using data from Statistics Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). The percentage of children in low-income is calculated based on Statistics Canada's low income cut-offs (LICOs), using data on family income after government benefits are received and after federal and provincial taxes are paid.

    Release date: 2009-12-16

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X200900711026
    Description:

    The information in this document is intended primarily to be used by scientific and technological (S&T) policy makers, both federal and provincial, largely as a basis for inter-provincial and inter-sectoral comparisons. The statistics are aggregates of the provincial government and provincial research organization science surveys conducted by Statistics Canada under contract with the provinces, and cover the period 2002/2003 to 2006/2007.

    Release date: 2009-11-20

  • Stats in brief: 13-605-X200900111028
    Description:

    Revised estimates of the Income and Expenditure Accounts (IEA) covering the period 2005 to 2008 have been released along with those for the first quarter of 2009. These revised estimates incorporate the most current source data and seasonal patterns.

    Release date: 2009-11-19

  • Stats in brief: 13-605-X200900111029
    Description:

    Quarterly international merchandise trade statistics are published approximately six weeks after the reference period. Two weeks later, these data are incorporated into the Income and Expenditure Accounts, at which point they are subject to revision. This note outlines the primary sources of the revisions.

    Release date: 2009-11-19

  • Stats in brief: 81-599-X2009003
    Description:

    This fact sheet looks at enrolment in and graduation from registered apprenticeship programs, and programs offered at colleges and universities. It also examines differences in the proportions of men and women among students and graduates for these types of education, and within different fields of study. Tables released at the same time as this fact sheet complement the text and summarize data for Canada and the provinces and territories. The data were obtained from the Labour Force Survey, the Postsecondary Student Information System and the Registered Apprenticeship Information System.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X200900610977
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication presents recent information on the performance and funding of Federal government expenditures on scientific activities, 2009/2010. The statistics presented are derived from the survey of science and technology (S&T) activities of federal departments and agencies. The data in this release are consistent with expenditures of departments and agencies as reported in the Main Estimates 2009/2010, but do not reflect changes to 2009/2010 spending plans which may result from supplementary estimates or other departmental planning decisions.

    Release date: 2009-10-15

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X200900510901
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The higher education sector is composed of all universities, colleges of technology and other institutes of postsecondary education, whatever their source of finance or legal status. It also includes all research institutes, experimental stations and clinics operating under the direct control of, or administered by, or associated with higher education establishments.

    Release date: 2009-09-09

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X200900410909
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The universe for the RDCI consists of all firms known or believed to be involved in the performance or funding of R&D. The frame for this survey has a long history spanning back to the conception of the survey more than 50 years ago. Firms are identified through many sources but most frequently firms are added from the CRA (Canada Revenue Agency) T661 files.

    Release date: 2009-07-29

  • Stats in brief: 81-599-X2009002
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides summary information about students' transitions from school to the labour market, based on data showing employment status, earnings, and the mobility of students and graduates across Canada. Charts and tables released at the same time as this fact sheet complement the text and summarize data for Canada, the provinces and the territories from the Labour Force Survey, the National Graduates Survey, and the Follow-up of Graduates Survey.

    Release date: 2009-06-17

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X200900310877
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada's economic competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development and also on the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in R&D. In an earlier Science statistics bulletin, we published the gross domestic expenditures on R&D in Canada (GERD). This issue presents a supplementary measure to the GERD, the number of personnel who perform Canada's R&D activities.

    Release date: 2009-06-04
Articles and reports (264)

Articles and reports (264) (0 to 10 of 264 results)

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2009063
    Description:

    This paper highlights the Canadian Tourism Satellite Account (CTSA) developed by Statistics Canada. The CTSA provides an economic measure of the importance of tourism in terms of expenditures, Gross Domestic Product and employment for Canada. It permits a comparison of tourism with other industries within Canada since the concepts and methods used are based on the framework of the Canadian System of National Accounts. The study revealed that tourism is an important part of Canada's well diversified economy. This paper presents the results of the CTSA for reference year 2004.

    This study was prepared by staff of the Research and Development Projects and Analysis Section, Income and Expenditure Accounts Division, Statistics Canada. The study was funded by the Canadian Tourism Commission.

    Release date: 2009-12-24

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900211036
    Description:

    Surveys are frequently required to produce estimates for subpopulations, sometimes for a single subpopulation and sometimes for several subpopulations in addition to the total population. When membership of a rare subpopulation (or domain) can be determined from the sampling frame, selecting the required domain sample size is relatively straightforward. In this case the main issue is the extent of oversampling to employ when survey estimates are required for several domains and for the total population. Sampling and oversampling rare domains whose members cannot be identified in advance present a major challenge. A variety of methods has been used in this situation. In addition to large-scale screening, these methods include disproportionate stratified sampling, two-phase sampling, the use of multiple frames, multiplicity sampling, panel surveys, and the use of multi-purpose surveys. This paper illustrates the application of these methods in a range of social surveys.

    Release date: 2009-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900211038
    Description:

    We examine overcoming the overestimation in using generalized weight share method (GWSM) caused by link nonresponse in indirect sampling. A few adjustment methods incorporating link nonresponse in using GWSM have been constructed for situations both with and without the availability of auxiliary variables. A simulation study on a longitudinal survey is presented using some of the adjustment methods we recommend. The simulation results show that these adjusted GWSMs perform well in reducing both estimation bias and variance. The advancement in bias reduction is significant.

    Release date: 2009-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900211039
    Description:

    Propensity weighting is a procedure to adjust for unit nonresponse in surveys. A form of implementing this procedure consists of dividing the sampling weights by estimates of the probabilities that the sampled units respond to the survey. Typically, these estimates are obtained by fitting parametric models, such as logistic regression. The resulting adjusted estimators may become biased when the specified parametric models are incorrect. To avoid misspecifying such a model, we consider nonparametric estimation of the response probabilities by local polynomial regression. We study the asymptotic properties of the resulting estimator under quasi-randomization. The practical behavior of the proposed nonresponse adjustment approach is evaluated on NHANES data.

    Release date: 2009-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900211040
    Description:

    In this paper a multivariate structural time series model is described that accounts for the panel design of the Dutch Labour Force Survey and is applied to estimate monthly unemployment rates. Compared to the generalized regression estimator, this approach results in a substantial increase of the accuracy due to a reduction of the standard error and the explicit modelling of the bias between the subsequent waves.

    Release date: 2009-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900211041
    Description:

    Estimation of small area (or domain) compositions may suffer from informative missing data, if the probability of missing varies across the categories of interest as well as the small areas. We develop a double mixed modeling approach that combines a random effects mixed model for the underlying complete data with a random effects mixed model of the differential missing-data mechanism. The effect of sampling design can be incorporated through a quasi-likelihood sampling model. The associated conditional mean squared error of prediction is approximated in terms of a three-part decomposition, corresponding to a naive prediction variance, a positive correction that accounts for the hypothetical parameter estimation uncertainty based on the latent complete data, and another positive correction for the extra variation due to the missing data. We illustrate our approach with an application to the estimation of Municipality household compositions based on the Norwegian register household data, which suffer from informative under-registration of the dwelling identity number.

    Release date: 2009-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900211042
    Description:

    This paper proposes an approach for small area prediction based on data obtained from periodic surveys and censuses. We apply our approach to obtain population predictions for the municipalities not sampled in the Brazilian annual Household Survey (PNAD), as well as to increase the precision of the design-based estimates obtained for the sampled municipalities. In addition to the data provided by the PNAD, we use census demographic data from 1991 and 2000, as well as a complete population count conducted in 1996. Hierarchically non-structured and spatially structured growth models that gain strength from all the sampled municipalities are proposed and compared.

    Release date: 2009-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900211043
    Description:

    Business surveys often use a one-stage stratified simple random sampling without replacement design with some certainty strata. Although weight adjustment is typically applied for unit nonresponse, the variability due to nonresponse may be omitted in practice when estimating variances. This is problematic especially when there are certainty strata. We derive some variance estimators that are consistent when the number of sampled units in each weighting cell is large, using the jackknife, linearization, and modified jackknife methods. The derived variance estimators are first applied to empirical data from the Annual Capital Expenditures Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau and are then examined in a simulation study.

    Release date: 2009-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900211044
    Description:

    In large scaled sample surveys it is common practice to employ stratified multistage designs where units are selected using simple random sampling without replacement at each stage. Variance estimation for these types of designs can be quite cumbersome to implement, particularly for non-linear estimators. Various bootstrap methods for variance estimation have been proposed, but most of these are restricted to single-stage designs or two-stage cluster designs. An extension of the rescaled bootstrap method (Rao and Wu 1988) to stratified multistage designs is proposed which can easily be extended to any number of stages. The proposed method is suitable for a wide range of reweighting techniques, including the general class of calibration estimators. A Monte Carlo simulation study was conducted to examine the performance of the proposed multistage rescaled bootstrap variance estimator.

    Release date: 2009-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900211045
    Description:

    In analysis of sample survey data, degrees-of-freedom quantities are often used to assess the stability of design-based variance estimators. For example, these degrees-of-freedom values are used in construction of confidence intervals based on t distribution approximations; and of related t tests. In addition, a small degrees-of-freedom term provides a qualitative indication of the possible limitations of a given variance estimator in a specific application. Degrees-of-freedom calculations sometimes are based on forms of the Satterthwaite approximation. These Satterthwaite-based calculations depend primarily on the relative magnitudes of stratum-level variances. However, for designs involving a small number of primary units selected per stratum, standard stratum-level variance estimators provide limited information on the true stratum variances. For such cases, customary Satterthwaite-based calculations can be problematic, especially in analyses for subpopulations that are concentrated in a relatively small number of strata. To address this problem, this paper uses estimated within-primary-sample-unit (within PSU) variances to provide auxiliary information regarding the relative magnitudes of the overall stratum-level variances. Analytic results indicate that the resulting degrees-of-freedom estimator will be better than modified Satterthwaite-type estimators provided: (a) the overall stratum-level variances are approximately proportional to the corresponding within-stratum variances; and (b) the variances of the within-PSU variance estimators are relatively small. In addition, this paper develops errors-in-variables methods that can be used to check conditions (a) and (b) empirically. For these model checks, we develop simulation-based reference distributions, which differ substantially from reference distributions based on customary large-sample normal approximations. The proposed methods are applied to four variables from the U.S. Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III).

    Release date: 2009-12-23
Journals and periodicals (11)

Journals and periodicals (11) (0 to 10 of 11 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 13-015-X
    Description:

    This report contains descriptive analysis of the size, scope and nature of Canada's nonprofit sector in economic terms, statistical tables and information on the concepts, and data sources and methods used to compile the estimates.

    Release date: 2009-12-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-571-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report provides an overview of the first available data on business fraud in Canada focusing on businesses in the retail, banking and insurance sectors. Data used in this report are from the Survey of Fraud against Businesses, 2007-2008. The Survey of Fraud against Businesses provides national-level data on the prevalence and types of fraud experienced, how businesses respond to incidents of fraud, the monetary and non-monetary costs of fraud and fraud detection and prevention practices.

    Release date: 2009-12-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-634-X
    Description:

    The Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) provides an extensive set of data about Aboriginal (Métis, Inuit, and off-reserve First Nations) children under 6 years of age in urban, rural, and northern locations across Canada. The Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) was designed to provide a picture of the early development of Aboriginal children and the social and living conditions in which they are learning and growing.

    The survey was developed by Statistics Canada and Aboriginal advisors from across the country and was conducted jointly with Human Resources and Social Development Canada.

    Release date: 2009-11-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-599-M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This research paper series addresses many topics related to children and youth in Canada, including: cognitive, physical and emotional development; health; behaviour; relationships with others; experiences in the home, at school and at work; family change; and transitions to adulthood. The main data source for the papers in this series is the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

    Release date: 2009-09-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-542-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report offers highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering, and Participating (CSGVP) which was undertaken to better understand how Canadians support individuals and communities on their own or through their involvement with charitable and non-profit organizations. For this survey, thousands of Canadians aged 15 and over were asked how they: gave money and other resources to individuals and to organizations; volunteered time to help others and to enhance their communities; and participated in the practices which help give substance to active citizenship. The results from this survey allow this report to tell a story about who Canada's volunteers and charitable donors are and the ways in which they contribute to our society.

    Release date: 2009-06-08

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-003-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The bulletin summarizes and highlights new results in the analysis of science, technology and the information society. The articles cover current issues in science and technology activities, advanced technologies, innovation in industry and electronic media. The bulletin is designed to be easily readable by non-experts.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Journals and periodicals: 18-504-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis (RSGA) of the Agriculture Division prepared a series of maps and statistics that show the progression of the 2009 Red River valley flood in Manitoba for the spring of 2009. Starting with an image acquired on March 31, the maps were produced from the analysis of Radarsat-2 satellite image data integrated with 2006 Census of Agriculture data and census geography boundary files. From this analysis, the total area of flooded agriculture land and the number of farmers affected were calculated. A comparison is made with the 1997 flood that occurred in the same region.

    Release date: 2009-05-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-600-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    To understand the degree to which the supply of workers in health occupations is meeting (and will meet) the health needs of Canadians, Health Canada asked Statistics Canada to study the relationship between education and training and the supply of professionals into health occupations. This series of fact sheets highlights, in summary form, key information relating to the education and training of workers in health and related occupations in Canada.

    Release date: 2009-05-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-004-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report introduces the Crime Severity Index, a new tool for measuring police-reported crime in Canada that for the first time tracks changes in the severity of crime, not just volume.The report also examines how crime is measured in Canada, as well as recent improvements to statistics on crime that are gathered from the police.

    Release date: 2009-04-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-550-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is an analytical report on Services to Official-Language Minorities by Health Professionals. This report explores the availability of health professionals who can work in either official language to serve the needs of official language minorities and compares the number of those professionals with the distribution of minority and majority populations in each region of the country.

    Release date: 2009-04-20
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