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All (266) (0 to 10 of 266 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201900400001
    Description:

    This study, based on the linked Canadian Community Health Survey-Longitudinal Immigration database, offers a first look at the healthy immigrant effect among selected immigrants arriving under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act by comparing these results with those for their Canadian-born counterparts.

    Release date: 2019-04-17

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201910719133
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-04-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-657-X
    Description:

    This thematic series groups different statistical products related to ethnicity, languages, and immigration. It features analytical documents of varying scopes, such as population profiles, reference materials, data products (including tables and factsheets), among other document types.

    Release date: 2019-04-17

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201910620385
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019010
    Description:

    While several studies have documented the evolution of the earnings of immigrants in Canada over the last three decades, the evolution of immigrants’ wealth has received relatively little attention. Using data from the Survey of Financial Security of 1999, 2005, 2012 and 2016, this study fills this gap. The study uncovers several key patterns.

    Release date: 2019-04-16

  • Stats in brief: 11-631-X2019001
    Description:

    This presentation on Ethnocultural Diversity and Inclusion in Canada shows an overview of the evolution of ethnic, cultural, religious and linguistic diversity and its measurement in Canada, with a focus on one of the country’s largest metropolitan areas: Montréal.

    It also outlines the inherent challenges and opportunities embedded in the measurement of diversity and highlights some of the very real socio-economic disparities observed on the road to inclusiveness and integration.

    Release date: 2019-04-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 75-006-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of data sources in order to provide information on various aspects of Canadian society, including labour, income, education, social, and demographic issues, that affect the lives of Canadians.

    Release date: 2019-04-03

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201907020165
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019007
    Description:

    Canada welcomed over 830,000 refugees from the 1980s to 2000s. However, their economic outcomes, especially the variation among major refugee groups, have not been examined comprehensively. Using the Longitudinal Immigration Database, this paper examines the labour market outcomes of refugees from 13 source countries with large inflows to Canada over the 1980-to-2009 period. The analysis first compares employment rates and earnings among refugees from the 13 source countries. It further compares each refugee group with economic-class and family-class immigrants who arrived during the same period.

    Release date: 2019-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 89-657-X2019002
    Description:

    The Black population in Canada is widely diverse and has a long and rich history. This publication outlines the demographic and diversity of this population. It contains a mix of tables, charts and maps, as well as short descriptive analysis of census data on some key topics related to the Black population, including gender, age structure, place of birth/generation status, immigration, ethnic origins, languages and geographical highlights.

    Release date: 2019-02-27
Stats in brief (49)

Stats in brief (49) (0 to 10 of 49 results)

Articles and reports (205)

Articles and reports (205) (0 to 10 of 205 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201900400001
    Description:

    This study, based on the linked Canadian Community Health Survey-Longitudinal Immigration database, offers a first look at the healthy immigrant effect among selected immigrants arriving under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act by comparing these results with those for their Canadian-born counterparts.

    Release date: 2019-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019010
    Description:

    While several studies have documented the evolution of the earnings of immigrants in Canada over the last three decades, the evolution of immigrants’ wealth has received relatively little attention. Using data from the Survey of Financial Security of 1999, 2005, 2012 and 2016, this study fills this gap. The study uncovers several key patterns.

    Release date: 2019-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019007
    Description:

    Canada welcomed over 830,000 refugees from the 1980s to 2000s. However, their economic outcomes, especially the variation among major refugee groups, have not been examined comprehensively. Using the Longitudinal Immigration Database, this paper examines the labour market outcomes of refugees from 13 source countries with large inflows to Canada over the 1980-to-2009 period. The analysis first compares employment rates and earnings among refugees from the 13 source countries. It further compares each refugee group with economic-class and family-class immigrants who arrived during the same period.

    Release date: 2019-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 89-657-X2019002
    Description:

    The Black population in Canada is widely diverse and has a long and rich history. This publication outlines the demographic and diversity of this population. It contains a mix of tables, charts and maps, as well as short descriptive analysis of census data on some key topics related to the Black population, including gender, age structure, place of birth/generation status, immigration, ethnic origins, languages and geographical highlights.

    Release date: 2019-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019006
    Description:

    Using 2016 Canadian Census data, this article examines the socioeconomic status of the second generation of immigrants, whose population has become increasingly diverse. The analysis focuses on group differences by visible minority status in two aspects relating to socioeconomic mobility: (1) intergenerational progress in educational attainment, which indicates the ability to achieve higher education regardless of parents’ education, and (2) the relationship between education and labour market outcomes, which reveals the ability to convert educational qualifications into economic well-being.

    Release date: 2019-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100001
    Description:

    In this study, data from the 2016 Census are used to provide a sociodemographic profile of the Syrian refugees who resettled in Canada between January 1, 2015, and May 10, 2016, and who were still living in Canada at the time of the census. This article also analyses the labour market participation of Syrian refugees, and provides some information about their housing conditions.

    Release date: 2019-02-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019001
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series highlights new data on the ownership of residential properties in Toronto and Vancouver. It focuses solely on residential properties owned by Canadian residents, and evaluates how the housing assets of immigrants differ from those owned by Canadian-born residents. It reports on the prevalence of immigrant ownership for different types of housing, including single-detached houses, semi-detached houses, row houses and condominium apartments, and compares the property values of Canadian-born and immigrant-owned assets. Information on the location, age and size of properties is used to assess differences in the relative value of immigrant-owned housing.

    Release date: 2019-01-29

  • Articles and reports: 89-657-X2019001
    Description:

    This document presents a descriptive analysis of recent and established immigrants in Canada, in Canada outside Quebec, in each province and territory, and in the six largest census metropolitan areas (CMAs) in the country, by certain linguistic characteristics and by their main countries of birth. This analysis comprises five sections. The first section presents statistics on immigrants' first official language spoken. The second and third sections respectively address immigrants' mother tongue and the language spoken most often at home. The fourth section provides statistics on their knowledge of the official languages (English and French) by mother tongue of the immigrant population. Lastly, the fifth section explores the main countries of birth of immigrants.

    Release date: 2019-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2018019
    Description:

    The Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB) is a comprehensive source of data that plays a key role in the understanding of the economic behaviour of immigrants. It is the only annual Canadian dataset that allows users to study the characteristics of immigrants to Canada at the time of admission and their economic outcomes and regional (inter-provincial) mobility over a time span of more than 30 years. The IMDB combines administrative files on immigrant admissions and non-permanent resident permits from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) with tax files from the Canadian Revenue Agency (CRA). Information is available for immigrant taxfilers admitted since 1980. Tax records for 1982 and subsequent years are available for immigrant taxfilers. This report will discuss the IMDB data sources, concepts and variables, record linkage, data processing, dissemination, data evaluation and quality indicators, comparability with other immigration datasets, and the analyses possible with the IMDB.

    Release date: 2018-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018411
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    Immigrants tend to reside disproportionately in larger Canadian cities, which may challenge their absorptive capacity. This study uses the linked Longitudinal Immigration Database and T1 Family File to examine the initial location and onward migration decisions of immigrants who are economic principal applicants (EPAs) and who have landed since the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act was passed. The main objective of the study is to identify the factors associated with initially residing and remaining in Canada’s three largest gateway cities: Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver (referred to as MTV).

    Release date: 2018-12-07
Journals and periodicals (12)

Journals and periodicals (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-657-X
    Description:

    This thematic series groups different statistical products related to ethnicity, languages, and immigration. It features analytical documents of varying scopes, such as population profiles, reference materials, data products (including tables and factsheets), among other document types.

    Release date: 2019-04-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 75-006-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of data sources in order to provide information on various aspects of Canadian society, including labour, income, education, social, and demographic issues, that affect the lives of Canadians.

    Release date: 2019-04-03

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-606-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This series of analytical reports provides an overview of the Canadian labour market experiences of immigrants to Canada, based on data from the Labour Force Survey. These reports examine the labour force characteristics of immigrants, by reporting on employment and unemployment at the Canada level, for the provinces and large metropolitan areas. They also provide more detailed analysis by region of birth, as well as in-depth analysis of other specific aspects of the immigrant labour market.

    Release date: 2018-12-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-551-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    These analytical products present projections of the diversity of the Canadian population. The purpose of these projections is to paint a potential portrait of the composition of Canada’s population according to different ethnocultural and language characteristics, if certain population growth scenarios were to become reality in the future. Produced using Demosim, a microsimulation model, these projections cover characteristics such as place of birth, generation status, visible minority group, religion and mother tongue.

    Release date: 2017-01-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-003-X
    Description:

    Canadian Demographics at a glance is designed to gather a maximum of demographic information in a single document, giving users an easily and quickly accessible up-to-date picture of the Canadian population. It presents data on demographic growth, fertility, mortality, migratory movements, aging and ethno-cultural diversity of the population in the form of tables and graphs accompanied by a brief analytical commentary.

    Release date: 2014-06-19

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-402-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Presented in almanac style, the 2012 Canada Year Book contains more than 500 pages of tables, charts and succinct analytical articles on every major area of Statistics Canada's expertise. The Canada Year Book is the premier reference on the social and economic life of Canada and its citizens.

    Release date: 2012-12-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-624-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Immigrants to Canada must face numerous difficulties during their first years in the country, the two most important being to find an appropriate job and language barrier. But does a better knowledge of official languages increase the chances for an immigrant of occupying a high-skilled job, a job in the intended occupation, a job similar to the one they had before immigrating, a job related to their training or field of study, or to have a higher hourly rate?

    In an attempt to answer this question, the data from the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC) were used. In the LSIC, a cohort of immigrants was interviewed at three points in time being 6 months, 2 years and 4 years after arrival in the country. For this study, we used the information about the job occupied at the time of each interview, as well as the English and French self-assessed spoken ability levels at each of these moments.

    Release date: 2007-04-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-616-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper contains regional and provincial findings from the second wave of the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC). The LSIC was designed to study how newly arrived immigrants adjust over time to living in Canada.

    This paper focuses on the issue of labour market integration for immigrants at the regional and provincial levels. Labour market integration is a critical aspect of the immigrant settlement process. For the major provinces and Census Metropolitan Areas, this paper addresses questions such as: how long does it take newly arrived immigrants to get their first job? How many of them find employment in their intended occupation? And what obstacles do they encounter when looking for work?

    Release date: 2006-01-31

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-615-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC), conducted jointly by Statistics Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada under the Policy Research Initiative, is a comprehensive survey designed to study the process by which new immigrants adapt to Canadian society. About 12,000 immigrants aged 15 and older who arrived in Canada from abroad between October 2000 and September 2001 were interviewed. By late 2005, when all three waves of interviews will have been completed, the survey will provide a better understanding of how the settlement process unfolds for new immigrants.

    The results of this survey will provide valuable information on how immigrants are meeting various challenges associated with integration and what resources are most helpful to their settlement in Canada. The main topics being investigated include housing, education, foreign credentials recognition, employment, income, the development and use of social networks, language skills, health, values and attitudes, and satisfaction with the settlement experience.

    Results from the first wave of the LSIC had shown that labour market integration was a particularly critical aspect of the immigrant settlement process. This paper therefore focuses on this issue. The release addresses questions such as: how long does it take newly arrived immigrants to get their first job? How many of them find employment in their intended occupation? And what obstacles do they encounter when looking for work?

    Release date: 2005-10-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-614-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    By examining newcomers' progress over time, the LSIC affords the possibility of assisting researchers and policy-makers to go beyond existing descriptions of immigrant integration outcomes to an examination of how newcomers achieve these outcomes - in essence, the "how" and "why" dimensions. While the full value of the survey will be reached when the three waves of data collection are completed, this first wave of data provides important benchmark information.

    The focus of this publication is on the early settlement experiences of immigrants, from pre-migration to the first six months after arrival. First an overview of the LSIC population is provided, looking at both pre-migration characteristics as well as those at arrival. This is followed by a comprehensive look at the first six months of the settlement process, looking at things such as health, housing and mobility; education and training taken since arrival; employment, income and the general perception of the immigrant's settlement experience. Finally, a more in-depth look at problems and difficulties newcomers experience in four key areas of integration is presented: accessing health services, finding housing, accessing education and training and finding employment. Challenges to integration are examined in terms of what help was needed, received and from whom, or needed and not received.

    Release date: 2005-09-13
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