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All (33) (0 to 10 of 33 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019019
    Description:

    The purpose of the 2017 General Social Survey on Family is to explore the characteristics of Canadian families and monitor changes in these characteristics over time. Using information on the conjugal and parental history of respondents, this infographic examines the proportion and the characteristics of people in Canada aged 55 and older whose current relationship (marriage or common-law) was long-lasting, that is, had been ongoing for 30 years or more.

    Release date: 2019-03-13

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100003
    Description:

    This study uses the Census of Population and the 2017 General Social Survey on Family to examine the characteristics of the population living alone in Canada. The demographic, socioeconomic and housing characteristics of persons who live alone are examined, as well as their conjugal history, family relationships, and well-being indicators.

    Release date: 2019-03-06

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201906519140
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-03-06

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019018
    Description:

    This infographic presents results from the 1981 and 2016 Censuses of Population and the 2017 General Social Survey on Family. The infographic depicts changes over time and provides selected characteristics of persons in Canada who lived alone in the reference years, including demographic statistics such as marital status, age and sex as well as statistics on future intentions to marry.

    Release date: 2019-03-06

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019014
    Description:

    This infographic presents results from the 2017 General Social Survey on families; more specifically people aged 25 -64 years old and who reported being in a couple relationship with someone not living in their household.

    Release date: 2019-02-20

  • Stats in brief: 89-28-0001201800100011
    Description:

    Everyone in Canada is, or has been, part of a family. The purpose of this Just the Facts edition is to celebrate families in Canada on Family Day 2019 (a statutory holiday in some provinces) by acknowledging their diversity and how they have changed over time. Data from the Census of Population and the General Social Survey together provide a snapshot of families today in the historical album of family life in Canada.

    Release date: 2019-02-18

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201904619984
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-02-15

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019002
    Description:

    This infographic presents results from the 2017 General Social Survey on families; more specifically the co-residence of adult children with their parents. The population of interest is of Canadians 18 years of age and over living with both parents, their mother only or their father only.

    Release date: 2019-02-15

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201903819983
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-02-07

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019001
    Description:

    This infographic presents results from the 2017 General Social Survey on families; more specifically grandparents in Canada. The population of interest is Canadians aged 45 and over who are grandparents.

    Release date: 2019-02-07
Stats in brief (15)

Stats in brief (15) (0 to 10 of 15 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019019
    Description:

    The purpose of the 2017 General Social Survey on Family is to explore the characteristics of Canadian families and monitor changes in these characteristics over time. Using information on the conjugal and parental history of respondents, this infographic examines the proportion and the characteristics of people in Canada aged 55 and older whose current relationship (marriage or common-law) was long-lasting, that is, had been ongoing for 30 years or more.

    Release date: 2019-03-13

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201906519140
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-03-06

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019018
    Description:

    This infographic presents results from the 1981 and 2016 Censuses of Population and the 2017 General Social Survey on Family. The infographic depicts changes over time and provides selected characteristics of persons in Canada who lived alone in the reference years, including demographic statistics such as marital status, age and sex as well as statistics on future intentions to marry.

    Release date: 2019-03-06

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019014
    Description:

    This infographic presents results from the 2017 General Social Survey on families; more specifically people aged 25 -64 years old and who reported being in a couple relationship with someone not living in their household.

    Release date: 2019-02-20

  • Stats in brief: 89-28-0001201800100011
    Description:

    Everyone in Canada is, or has been, part of a family. The purpose of this Just the Facts edition is to celebrate families in Canada on Family Day 2019 (a statutory holiday in some provinces) by acknowledging their diversity and how they have changed over time. Data from the Census of Population and the General Social Survey together provide a snapshot of families today in the historical album of family life in Canada.

    Release date: 2019-02-18

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201904619984
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-02-15

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019002
    Description:

    This infographic presents results from the 2017 General Social Survey on families; more specifically the co-residence of adult children with their parents. The population of interest is of Canadians 18 years of age and over living with both parents, their mother only or their father only.

    Release date: 2019-02-15

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201903819983
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-02-07

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019001
    Description:

    This infographic presents results from the 2017 General Social Survey on families; more specifically grandparents in Canada. The population of interest is Canadians aged 45 and over who are grandparents.

    Release date: 2019-02-07

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201733517481
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-12-01
Articles and reports (17)

Articles and reports (17) (0 to 10 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100003
    Description:

    This study uses the Census of Population and the 2017 General Social Survey on Family to examine the characteristics of the population living alone in Canada. The demographic, socioeconomic and housing characteristics of persons who live alone are examined, as well as their conjugal history, family relationships, and well-being indicators.

    Release date: 2019-03-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700154877
    Description:

    This study uses data from the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) to examine the prevalence of early motherhood (i.e., having become a mother before the age of 20) among First Nations women living off reserve, Métis women and Inuit women aged 20 to 44. Data from the 2011 General Social Survey (GSS) are used for non-Aboriginal women. The study also examines whether early motherhood is associated with different outcomes in terms of education and employment.

    Release date: 2017-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114154
    Description:

    Even though most grandparents live in separate households from their adult children and grandchildren, sometimes the grandparent and grandchild generations live together. This paper provides information on the number of grandparents who are in this particular situation, along with their living arrangements and their ethnocultural and sociodemographic characteristics.

    Release date: 2015-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111904
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Census of Population and 2011 General Social Survey in order to examine the conjugal histories and living arrangements for current seniors, defined as individuals aged at least 65, and "future seniors", defined as individuals aged 55 to 64.

    Release date: 2014-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111771
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many individuals are not married or in a common-law relationship, but are in a stable relationship without living under the same roof. These couples are 'living apart together.' How many individuals are in this situation in Canada? Is this type of relationship increasing? Are these relationships motivated by lifestyle choices?

    Release date: 2013-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111366
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the different cycles of the General Social Survey from 2000 to 2008, this article explores the evolution of the popularity of working at home among employees and the self-employed. In particular, the characteristics of the workers most likely to work at home as well as the various reasons behind this phenomenon are studied. Perceptions about working at home and work-life balance are also discussed.

    Release date: 2010-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211165
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines family status of fathers in Canada. The sociodemographic, family and conjugal characteristics of fathers are analyzed to illustrate the many faces of fathers. The data from this analysis are taken from two different cycles of the General Social Survey on the family: Cycle 10 from 1995 and Cycle 20 from 2006.

    Release date: 2010-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410931
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Based on information available from the 2006 General Social Survey on families, this article will explore the nature of time children spend with their separated or divorced parents. Issues to be explored will include: the type of visitation/access arrangements; the length of time spent with each parent; whether the time involves leisure activities, regular care (school, daycare, social) and decision-making activities; and whether parents are satisfied with the arrangements they have for visitation/access.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900210919
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines whether access to maternity and paternity benefits influences a couple's decision to have a child. We identify characteristics of people who are most likely to say that benefits would transform intentions into behaviour.

    Release date: 2009-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900210918
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines the increasing prevalence of the proportion of mothers aged 40 to 44 with a pre-school aged child (0 to 4 years of age) over the past 20 years. It also presents a socio-economic profile of these mothers, in particular their education levels, occupations and place of birth.

    Release date: 2009-09-17
Journals and periodicals (1)

Journals and periodicals (1) ((1 result))

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-576-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The increasing popularity of common-law unions is transforming family life in Canada, according to new data from the 2001 General Social Survey. Over the past 30 years, common-law unions have become more and more popular, especially in Quebec and among younger women in other provinces.

    Although younger women are more likely to start their conjugal life by living common law, most will eventually marry. First common-law unions are twice as likely to end in separation as first marriages. What is more, a growing proportion of women have experienced at least two unions, and the likelihood of choosing a common-law relationship over marriage for the second union is also increasing. The analysis shows that the trends observed in the formation and break-up of unions apply equally to men and women. Since men are on average older than women when they start their conjugal life, they tend to experience the events at an older age.

    Release date: 2002-07-11
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