Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (471) (0 to 10 of 471 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202000500001
    Description:

    This study examines Canadians' concerns about the impact of COIVD-19 on their own health and the health of others, and the precautions individuals have taken to avoid infection.

    Release date: 2020-07-02

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202000500002
    Description:

    Canada recently adopted the 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth (24-Hour Guidelines) for young people aged 5 to 17 years-an international first, providing integrated recommendations for physical activity, sedentary time and sleep. Since the release of the guidelines, very few studies have examined the associations of adherence to the 24-Hour Guidelines with health outcomes-and none focus on psychosocial health. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the associations of meeting the 24-Hour Guidelines and their behaviour-specific recommendations with psychosocial health among Canadian children and youth.

    Release date: 2020-07-02

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202000100006
    Description:

    In surveys, logical boundaries among variables or among waves of surveys make imputation of missing values complicated. We propose a new regression-based multiple imputation method to deal with survey nonresponses with two-sided logical boundaries. This imputation method automatically satisfies the boundary conditions without an additional acceptance/rejection procedure and utilizes the boundary information to derive an imputed value and to determine the suitability of the imputed value. Simulation results show that our new imputation method outperforms the existing imputation methods for both mean and quantile estimations regardless of missing rates, error distributions, and missing-mechanisms. We apply our method to impute the self-reported variable “years of smoking” in successive health screenings of Koreans.

    Release date: 2020-06-30

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100038
    Description:

    This article presents an impact analysis and 2020 outlook for the Couriers and messenger services price index (CMSPI) amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Release date: 2020-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202000400001
    Description:

    This study used the most recent national-level data available on Canadians' dietary intakes to describe the quantity and composition of Canadians' vegetable and fruit intake in 2015 and to compare these with estimates from 2004. A secondary objective of this study was to assess the distribution of usual vegetable and fruit consumption and how it relates to recommendations in the 2007 Canada Food Guide, which was the food guide in effect in 2015. Data are from the 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) - Nutrition and the 2004 CCHS - Nutrition (Cycle 2.2).

    Release date: 2020-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202000300001
    Description:

    This study describes the characteristics of residential postal codes of the Canadian population using the 2016 Census and determines how frequently these postal codes are matched to one or more dissemination areas, a unit of census geography.

    Release date: 2020-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202000300002
    Description:

    The purpose of this study was to assess the risk of non accidental and cause specific mortality associated with long term exposure to PM2.5 among immigrants after they arrived in Canada, and to assess how this risk compares with that of the non immigrant population. Using the Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohort, this study also sought to determine the influence of several immigrant specific variables on the PM2.5 -mortality association, including duration in Canada, country of birth, age at immigration and neighbourhood ethnic concentration.

    Release date: 2020-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020009
    Description:

    The main objective of this paper is to determine whether the immigration status of the owner of a small or medium-sized enterprise (SME) affects the likelihood of a company implementing an innovation. This paper uses data from a survey of Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in 2011, 2014 and 2017, and asks whether immigrant-owned SMEs were more likely to innovate during the three years prior to the survey than those owned by Canadian-born individuals.

    Release date: 2020-06-09

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2020035
    Description:

    Food availability represents the amount of food that is physically present in a country for human consumption. This infographic highlights the change in food availability for selected food products suggesting a change in available healthy food for Canadians.

    Release date: 2020-05-28

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100002
    Description:

    This article discusses the potential impact of border restrictions due to COVID-19 as it relates to the availability of temporary foreign workers during the 2020 growing season.

    Release date: 2020-04-17
Stats in brief (13)

Stats in brief (13) (0 to 10 of 13 results)

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100038
    Description:

    This article presents an impact analysis and 2020 outlook for the Couriers and messenger services price index (CMSPI) amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Release date: 2020-06-30

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2020035
    Description:

    Food availability represents the amount of food that is physically present in a country for human consumption. This infographic highlights the change in food availability for selected food products suggesting a change in available healthy food for Canadians.

    Release date: 2020-05-28

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100002
    Description:

    This article discusses the potential impact of border restrictions due to COVID-19 as it relates to the availability of temporary foreign workers during the 2020 growing season.

    Release date: 2020-04-17

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2020006
    Description:

    This infographic displays a profile of the international students enrolled at Canadian public colleges and universities in the 2017/2018 academic year using Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS) data. It includes statistics such as: total enrolments, country of citizenship, province of study, level of education and field of study.

    Release date: 2020-02-19

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2020011
    Description:

    The infographic entitled Population of Canada's Metropolitan Areas and Municipalities, July 1, 2019 provides a summary of the most recent demographic trends in terms of population, growth and aging at the census metropolitan area (CMA) and the census subdivision (CSD) levels.

    Release date: 2020-02-13

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019065
    Description:

    Based on data from the Labour Force Survey, this infographic highlights the gender wage gap and its sources in 2018.

    Release date: 2019-10-07

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019061
    Description:

    This infographic provides a concise accurate snapshot of the most recent demographic trends in Canada, related to demographic growth and aging, at the national, provincial and territorial levels.

    Release date: 2019-09-30

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019047
    Description:

    The Annual Fruits and Vegetables Survey produces estimates of the total cultivated area, the harvested area, total production, marketed production, and farm gate value of selected fruits and vegetables grown in Canada. This infographic highlights fruits and vegetables enjoyed by Canadians throughout the summer months.

    Release date: 2019-08-26

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019012
    Description:

    This infographic examines the activities during the 12 months prior to September 2018 for 15- to 29-year-olds who were not in employment, education or training (NEET) in that month. The analysis is based on the one-time addition of questions on this topic to the Labour Force Survey in September 2018. At that time, 11.3% of young Canadians between 15 and 29 were NEET.

    Release date: 2019-02-13

  • Stats in brief: 82-624-X201600114649
    Description:

    Congenital anomalies, commonly referred to as birth defects, describe conditions that develop in the fetus at the time of conception or during pregnancy. This article presents data on trends in the average age at death, and death rates from five of the most common congenital anomalies: circulatory anomalies; Spina Bifida; and three chromosomal anomalies-Down syndrome, Edwards' syndrome and Patau's syndrome. Data from the 1974 to 2012 Canadian Vital Statistics-Deaths Database will be used to examine differences in the death rate due to congenital anomalies, among infants in Canada.

    Release date: 2016-09-29
Articles and reports (451)

Articles and reports (451) (0 to 10 of 451 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202000500001
    Description:

    This study examines Canadians' concerns about the impact of COIVD-19 on their own health and the health of others, and the precautions individuals have taken to avoid infection.

    Release date: 2020-07-02

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202000500002
    Description:

    Canada recently adopted the 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth (24-Hour Guidelines) for young people aged 5 to 17 years-an international first, providing integrated recommendations for physical activity, sedentary time and sleep. Since the release of the guidelines, very few studies have examined the associations of adherence to the 24-Hour Guidelines with health outcomes-and none focus on psychosocial health. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the associations of meeting the 24-Hour Guidelines and their behaviour-specific recommendations with psychosocial health among Canadian children and youth.

    Release date: 2020-07-02

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202000100006
    Description:

    In surveys, logical boundaries among variables or among waves of surveys make imputation of missing values complicated. We propose a new regression-based multiple imputation method to deal with survey nonresponses with two-sided logical boundaries. This imputation method automatically satisfies the boundary conditions without an additional acceptance/rejection procedure and utilizes the boundary information to derive an imputed value and to determine the suitability of the imputed value. Simulation results show that our new imputation method outperforms the existing imputation methods for both mean and quantile estimations regardless of missing rates, error distributions, and missing-mechanisms. We apply our method to impute the self-reported variable “years of smoking” in successive health screenings of Koreans.

    Release date: 2020-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202000400001
    Description:

    This study used the most recent national-level data available on Canadians' dietary intakes to describe the quantity and composition of Canadians' vegetable and fruit intake in 2015 and to compare these with estimates from 2004. A secondary objective of this study was to assess the distribution of usual vegetable and fruit consumption and how it relates to recommendations in the 2007 Canada Food Guide, which was the food guide in effect in 2015. Data are from the 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) - Nutrition and the 2004 CCHS - Nutrition (Cycle 2.2).

    Release date: 2020-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202000300001
    Description:

    This study describes the characteristics of residential postal codes of the Canadian population using the 2016 Census and determines how frequently these postal codes are matched to one or more dissemination areas, a unit of census geography.

    Release date: 2020-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202000300002
    Description:

    The purpose of this study was to assess the risk of non accidental and cause specific mortality associated with long term exposure to PM2.5 among immigrants after they arrived in Canada, and to assess how this risk compares with that of the non immigrant population. Using the Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohort, this study also sought to determine the influence of several immigrant specific variables on the PM2.5 -mortality association, including duration in Canada, country of birth, age at immigration and neighbourhood ethnic concentration.

    Release date: 2020-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020009
    Description:

    The main objective of this paper is to determine whether the immigration status of the owner of a small or medium-sized enterprise (SME) affects the likelihood of a company implementing an innovation. This paper uses data from a survey of Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in 2011, 2014 and 2017, and asks whether immigrant-owned SMEs were more likely to innovate during the three years prior to the survey than those owned by Canadian-born individuals.

    Release date: 2020-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201901200003
    Description:

    This article provides a description of the Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohorts (CanCHECs), a population-based linked datasets of the household population at the time of census collection. The CanCHEC datasets are rich national data resources that can be used to measure and examine health inequalities across socioeconomic and ethnocultural dimensions for different periods and locations. These datasets can also be used to examine the effects of exposure to environmental factors on human health.

    Release date: 2019-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900300002
    Description:

    Paradata is often collected during the survey process to monitor the quality of the survey response. One such paradata is a respondent behavior, which can be used to construct response models. The propensity score weight using the respondent behavior information can be applied to the final analysis to reduce the nonresponse bias. However, including the surrogate variable in the propensity score weighting does not always guarantee the efficiency gain. We show that the surrogate variable is useful only when it is correlated with the study variable. Results from a limited simulation study confirm the finding. A real data application using the Korean Workplace Panel Survey data is also presented.

    Release date: 2019-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900300007
    Description:

    Finding the optimal stratification and sample size in univariate and multivariate sample design is hard when the population frame is large. There are alternative ways of modelling and solving this problem, and one of the most natural uses genetic algorithms (GA) combined with the Bethel-Chromy evaluation algorithm. The GA iteratively searches for the minimum sample size necessary to meet precision constraints in partitionings of atomic strata created by the Cartesian product of auxiliary variables. We point out a drawback with classical GAs when applied to the grouping problem, and propose a new GA approach using “grouping” genetic operators instead of traditional operators. Experiments show a significant improvement in solution quality for similar computational effort.

    Release date: 2019-12-17
Journals and periodicals (7)

Journals and periodicals (7) ((7 results))

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-646-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Survey of Older Workers is sponsored by the Labour Market Policy branch of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). The survey is designed to assess the labour market intentions and transitions of older Canadians. The subject matter is intended to identify "factors" that influence the decision to retire or remain working. In this context pensions, general finances, the role of dependents, the nature of work, health considerations etc., will be of primary concern in trying to understand workers' intentions and motivations.

    Release date: 2010-11-15

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-571-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report provides an overview of the first available data on business fraud in Canada focusing on businesses in the retail, banking and insurance sectors. Data used in this report are from the Survey of Fraud against Businesses, 2007-2008. The Survey of Fraud against Businesses provides national-level data on the prevalence and types of fraud experienced, how businesses respond to incidents of fraud, the monetary and non-monetary costs of fraud and fraud detection and prevention practices.

    Release date: 2009-12-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 15-549-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper offers empirical evidence on the actual rates and forms of economic depreciation for a comprehensive set of assets. Using a Canadian micro database on the purchase and disposal of capital goods from Statistics Canada's Capital Expenditure Survey, the study estimates depreciation rates for 36 asset categories, which represent half of the Canadian business capital stock. Depreciation rates for the remaining assets are calibrated using the average age-price relationship from the estimation and surveyed service lives obtained from the Capital Expenditure Survey. The impact of the estimated depreciation rates on the Canadian capital stock and depreciation allowances is also presented.

    Release date: 2007-09-26

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-617-X
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    The International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey, undertaken in 2003, measured the proficiencies of a representative sample of Canadian adults aged 16 and over in four domains: prose literacy, document literacy, numeracy and problem solving, and benchmarked performance against an international standard. The proficiency scores are compared between provinces, territories and nations, and over time. Moreover, literacy performance is examined in relation to differences in variables such as educational attainment, employment and unemployment, earnings and self-assessed health. Analyses of the literacy performance of groups of special interest, including women and men, young adults and seniors, recent and established immigrants, and Aboriginal populations are included.

    Release date: 2005-11-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 82F0076X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Heart disease and stroke are major causes of illness, disability and death in Canada and they exact high personal, community and health care costs. The goal of The changing face of heart disease and stroke in Canada, the fifth in a series of reports from the Canadian Heart and Stroke Surveillance System (CHSSS), is to provide health professionals and policy makers with an overview of current trends in risk factors, interventions and services, and health outcomes of heart disease and stroke in Canada.

    Release date: 1999-10-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-517-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    New firms are seen to play a key role in the innovation process, especially in certain key sectors of the economy. This study therefore examines the differences in the profiles of successful new firms in science-based industries and other industries. The firms that are examined are entrants who survey into their early teen years. The study examines numerous factors that are seen to influence the success of new businesses. These include the competitive environment, business strategies and the financial structure of the businesses.

    Successful new firms in science-based industries are found to differ in a number of dimensions from new firms in other industries. They are more likely to be exporters. They face greater technological change and intense competition with regards to the rate at which new products are being introduced. They tend to put more emphasis on quality, the frequent introduction of new products and the customization of products. They make greater use of information technology. They place more stress on new technology development, research and development facilities and the use of intellectual property. They are much more likely to innovate and they place more importance on recruiting skilled labour and on training. Finally, they are more likely to use non-traditional financial measures to evaluate performance and they are less likely to rely on secured credit for financing both their research and development activity and their machinery and equipment that are firms in other sectors.

    Release date: 1999-03-31

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-516-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Innovation is at the heart of economic growth and development. It is through innovation that new products are brought to market, new production processes developed and organizational change realized. Given existing cross-industry variations in structure, competitiveness and maturity, it is reasonable to expect that firms in different industries will innovate for different reasons, in different ways and with different results. This report focuses on how the innovation activities of firms in three dynamic service industries are conditioned by their different environments.

    Through an understanding of what competitive pressures come into play and how these pressures affect the type of innovation that is performed, Innovation in dynamic service industries goes some way in illustrating how innovation regimes differ substantially, and quite logically, from one industry to another.

    This is the fifth in the series of publications on innovation and technological change in Canada. One of the earlier studies investigated the type of innovation taking place in the manufacturing sector (Baldwin and Da Pont, Innovation in Canadian manufacturing enterprises, Catalogue No. 88-513-XPB). Two others focused on advanced manufacturing technologies. The first (Baldwin and Sabourin, Technology adoption in Canadian manufacturing, Catalogue No. 88-512-XPB) outlined the intensity of use of these technologies. The second (Baldwin, Sabourin, and Rafiquzzaman, Benefits and problems associated with technology adoption, Catalogue No. 88-514-XPE) investigated the determinants of adoption. Another study (Baldwin, Innovation and intellectual property, Catalogue No. 88-515-XPE) examined how innovative firms protect their intellectual property after they have innovated.

    Release date: 1999-01-18
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