Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Author(s)

226 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Survey or statistical program

93 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (721)

All (721) (0 to 10 of 721 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202200600001
    Description:

    Estimates of polypharmacy (the concurrent use of five-or-more medications) have primarily been derived from prescription claims. Less is known about the use of non-prescription medications (alone or in combination with prescription medications) across the frailty spectrum or by sex. This study estimates the prevalence of polypharmacy (total, prescription, non-prescription, and concurrent prescription/non-prescription) overall, and by frailty, sex, and broad age groups.

    Release date: 2022-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202200600003
    Description:

    Canadian immigrants from countries where the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are endemic may be at higher risk of liver-related disease than Canadian-born residents. This study compared HBV- and HCV-related hospitalizations in Canadian immigrants (arriving from 1980 to 2013) and long-term residents (Canadian-born population and pre-1980 immigrants) and aimed to describe the burden of disease in both groups.

    Release date: 2022-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2022003
    Description:

    Using a database that integrates data from the Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS) with 2016 Census and tax data, this article compares, for the first time, the demographic characteristics of graduates at the bachelor level from each of the 10 population groups designated as visible minorities with graduates not belonging to these groups.

    Release date: 2022-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 17-20-00022022002
    Description:

    The Canadian Social Environment Typology (CanSET) is a geographic classification tool to compare neighbourhoods across Canadian Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations. The purpose of this user guide is to define the concept of identical Dissemination Area (DA) clusters used in the Canadian Social Environment Typology (CanSET) and to give an overview of how the clusters can be used to explore DA level health and social inequalities. The user guide also offers information on how to use the new social environment clusters to understand social and health inequalities in more populous areas in Canada.

    Release date: 2022-05-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2022005
    Description:

    This paper documents the use of the Worldwide Patent Statistical Database (PATSTAT), a global patent application database created by the European Patent Office, to create the Canadian Research Patent Database at Statistics Canada. Innovation is an important driver of the economy, and patent statistics are recognized as a useful measure of innovative activity. The current version of the Canadian Research Patent Database focuses on the worldwide patent applications of businesses with an address in Canada (Canada-resident businesses).

    Release date: 2022-04-19

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2022024
    Description:

    This infographic presents users with a visual representation of the latest released annual data on railway transportation in Canada.

    Release date: 2022-04-08

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200300004
    Description:

    This article provides an integrated analysis of recent changes in output, consumer spending, business investment, international trade and employment. It also draws on new data sources that provide detailed information on the financial conditions facing businesses and households. The analysis is based on data that are publicly available as of March 11, 2022.

    Release date: 2022-03-23

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2022011
    Description:

    "Canada's Poverty Reduction Strategy" introduces the Official Poverty Line for Canada with a dashboard of 12 Indicators to track progress on poverty reduction for Canadians and their households. This infographic presents trend information for Canada's Official Poverty Rate and the associated 12 indicators.

    Release date: 2022-03-23

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2022012
    Description:

    This infographic presents some highlights from the 2020 Canadian Income Survey data.

    Release date: 2022-03-23

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2022018
    Description:

    This infographic visually presents information on the proportion of children aged 1-17 in Canada who have experienced the separation or divorce of their parents, and shows estimates by province and child’s age. It additionally presents information on children’s living arrangements and contact with the non-resident parent after a parental divorce or separation. This infographic is based on data from the 2019 Canadian Health Survey on Children and Youth (CHSCY).

    Release date: 2022-03-23
Stats in brief (43)

Stats in brief (43) (0 to 10 of 43 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2022024
    Description:

    This infographic presents users with a visual representation of the latest released annual data on railway transportation in Canada.

    Release date: 2022-04-08

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2022011
    Description:

    "Canada's Poverty Reduction Strategy" introduces the Official Poverty Line for Canada with a dashboard of 12 Indicators to track progress on poverty reduction for Canadians and their households. This infographic presents trend information for Canada's Official Poverty Rate and the associated 12 indicators.

    Release date: 2022-03-23

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2022012
    Description:

    This infographic presents some highlights from the 2020 Canadian Income Survey data.

    Release date: 2022-03-23

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2022018
    Description:

    This infographic visually presents information on the proportion of children aged 1-17 in Canada who have experienced the separation or divorce of their parents, and shows estimates by province and child’s age. It additionally presents information on children’s living arrangements and contact with the non-resident parent after a parental divorce or separation. This infographic is based on data from the 2019 Canadian Health Survey on Children and Youth (CHSCY).

    Release date: 2022-03-23

  • Stats in brief: 11-633-X2022001
    Description:

    In 2020, Statistics Canada began publishing monthly releases of data on business openings and closures. This study provides a better understanding of business dynamics and provides decision makers with evidence to support economic policy development.

    Release date: 2022-01-25

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202100100041
    Description:

    This article uses data from the first series of the Canadian Social Survey - COVID-19 and Well-being (CSS-CW) to examine whether persons aged 15 to 49 made changes to their fertility plans because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Changes to fertility intentions are explored, including those related to the timing of childbearing and those impacting the number of desired children. Lastly, we examine to what extent persons having certain sociodemographic characteristics were more or less likely to adjust their fertility plans in response to the pandemic.

    Release date: 2021-12-01

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2021049
    Description:

    The 2020 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) measures the impact of digital technologies on the lives of Canadians, including how individuals access and use the Internet, their intensity of use, demand for certain online activities, and interactions online as well as the changes in use of digital tech as a result of COVID-19. This infographic examines Canadians use of the Internet and digital technologies as well as certain online activities done for the first time during COVID-19.

    Release date: 2021-09-07

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202100100019
    Description:

    The shift by Canadians to a more physically distanced life resulted in a dramatic reduction in the transmission of COVID-19. However, there are concerns that health behaviours, including physical activity, have consequently changed in ways that will result in an unintended increase in the risk of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes and cancer. This study looks at how many Canadians could develop cardiovascular disease over the next three years because of reduced levels of physical activity during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Release date: 2021-06-25

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2021048
    Description:

    The 2020 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) measures the impact of digital technologies on the lives of Canadians, including how individuals access and use the Internet, their intensity of use, demand for certain online activities such as e-commerce and barriers to shopping online. This infographic examines what Canadians have reported about their online spending behaviours.

    Release date: 2021-06-22

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202100100018
    Description:

    Colorectal cancer screening, along with other health care services, was suspended in Canada in the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic response. This pause was deemed necessary to allow health care facilities to establish appropriate infection-control measures to prevent COVID-19 outbreaks and to reserve health system capacity for COVID-19 patients. The current article projects the impact of a three-month suspension of screening for colorectal cancer using a fecal test for average-risk individuals, and compares strategies to minimize the harm from screening interruptions. The projections come from OncoSim, a cancer microsimulation model co-developed by Statistics Canada and the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer.

    Release date: 2021-06-17
Articles and reports (662)

Articles and reports (662) (0 to 10 of 662 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202200600001
    Description:

    Estimates of polypharmacy (the concurrent use of five-or-more medications) have primarily been derived from prescription claims. Less is known about the use of non-prescription medications (alone or in combination with prescription medications) across the frailty spectrum or by sex. This study estimates the prevalence of polypharmacy (total, prescription, non-prescription, and concurrent prescription/non-prescription) overall, and by frailty, sex, and broad age groups.

    Release date: 2022-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202200600003
    Description:

    Canadian immigrants from countries where the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are endemic may be at higher risk of liver-related disease than Canadian-born residents. This study compared HBV- and HCV-related hospitalizations in Canadian immigrants (arriving from 1980 to 2013) and long-term residents (Canadian-born population and pre-1980 immigrants) and aimed to describe the burden of disease in both groups.

    Release date: 2022-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2022003
    Description:

    Using a database that integrates data from the Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS) with 2016 Census and tax data, this article compares, for the first time, the demographic characteristics of graduates at the bachelor level from each of the 10 population groups designated as visible minorities with graduates not belonging to these groups.

    Release date: 2022-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 17-20-00022022002
    Description:

    The Canadian Social Environment Typology (CanSET) is a geographic classification tool to compare neighbourhoods across Canadian Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations. The purpose of this user guide is to define the concept of identical Dissemination Area (DA) clusters used in the Canadian Social Environment Typology (CanSET) and to give an overview of how the clusters can be used to explore DA level health and social inequalities. The user guide also offers information on how to use the new social environment clusters to understand social and health inequalities in more populous areas in Canada.

    Release date: 2022-05-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2022005
    Description:

    This paper documents the use of the Worldwide Patent Statistical Database (PATSTAT), a global patent application database created by the European Patent Office, to create the Canadian Research Patent Database at Statistics Canada. Innovation is an important driver of the economy, and patent statistics are recognized as a useful measure of innovative activity. The current version of the Canadian Research Patent Database focuses on the worldwide patent applications of businesses with an address in Canada (Canada-resident businesses).

    Release date: 2022-04-19

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200300004
    Description:

    This article provides an integrated analysis of recent changes in output, consumer spending, business investment, international trade and employment. It also draws on new data sources that provide detailed information on the financial conditions facing businesses and households. The analysis is based on data that are publicly available as of March 11, 2022.

    Release date: 2022-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2022002
    Description:

    A review of how prices for products manufactured in Canada, as measured by the Industrial Product Price Index (IPPI), changed in 2021 when compared to 2020. The ongoing effects of COVID-19, macroeconomic phenomena, supply chain issues, as well as international trade all played roles in influencing industrial prices. Prices for lumber, energy products, and metals had a strong influence on the IPPI in 2021.

    Release date: 2022-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202200200002
    Description:

    Food insecurity linked to insufficient income is an important determinant of health. Whether the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated levels of food insecurity in Canada during the pandemic, particularly among vulnerable groups, is unclear. This study estimated the proportion of Canadians reporting experience of household food insecurity six-to-nine months into the COVID-19 pandemic, and drew comparisons to pre-pandemic levels.

    Release date: 2022-02-16

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202101200002
    Description:

    Reliance on the use of opioids to manage pain has increased over time, as have opioid-related morbidity and deaths. In 2019, Statistics Canada reported descriptive associations between demographic and geographic descriptors, certain mental health disorders, and problematic opioid pain relief medications (OPRM) use among Canada’s OPRM-using population aged 15 years or older. The goal of this analysis is to extend that previous research by using modelling to examine the associations for a broader range of characteristics. It strives to clarify which socioeconomic, health behaviour and psychosocial factors are independently and significantly associated with a greater likelihood of problematic OPRM use after accounting for other descriptors.

    Release date: 2022-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202100200002
    Description:

    When linking massive data sets, blocking is used to select a manageable subset of record pairs at the expense of losing a few matched pairs. This loss is an important component of the overall linkage error, because blocking decisions are made early on in the linkage process, with no way to revise them in subsequent steps. Yet, measuring this contribution is still a major challenge because of the need to model all the pairs in the Cartesian product of the sources, not just those satisfying the blocking criteria. Unfortunately, previous error models are of little use because they typically do not meet this requirement. This paper addresses the issue with a new finite mixture model, which dispenses with clerical reviews, training data, or the assumption that the linkage variables are conditionally independent. It applies when applying a standard blocking procedure for the linkage of a file to a register or a census with complete coverage, where both sources are free of duplicate records.

    Release date: 2022-01-06
Journals and periodicals (16)

Journals and periodicals (16) (0 to 10 of 16 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-644-X
    Description:

    This document of fact sheets provides an early learning profile of Métis, Inuit, and off-reserve First Nations children under the age of six in Canada. The 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey is used to provide broad indicators of young Aboriginal children's experiences with learning. Data include how they learn about words and traditional activities and who helps them learn. Family characteristics associated with participation in early learning activities are also presented.

    Release date: 2010-06-18

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-542-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report offers highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering, and Participating (CSGVP) which was undertaken to better understand how Canadians support individuals and communities on their own or through their involvement with charitable and non-profit organizations. For this survey, thousands of Canadians aged 15 and over were asked how they: gave money and other resources to individuals and to organizations; volunteered time to help others and to enhance their communities; and participated in the practices which help give substance to active citizenship. The results from this survey allow this report to tell a story about who Canada's volunteers and charitable donors are and the ways in which they contribute to our society.

    Release date: 2009-06-08

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-639-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Beginning in late 2006, the Social and Aboriginal Statistics Division of Statistics Canada embarked on the process of review of questions used in the Census and in surveys to produce data about Aboriginal peoples (North American Indian, Métis and Inuit). This process is essential to ensure that Aboriginal identification questions are valid measures of contemporary Aboriginal identification, in all its complexity. Questions reviewed included the following (from the Census 2B questionnaire):- the Ethnic origin / Aboriginal ancestry question;- the Aboriginal identity question;- the Treaty / Registered Indian question; and- the Indian band / First Nation Membership question.

    Additional testing was conducted on Census questions with potential Aboriginal response options: the population group question (also known as visible minorities), and the Religion question. The review process to date has involved two major steps: regional discussions with data users and stakeholders, and qualitative testing. The regional discussions with over 350 users of Aboriginal data across Canada were held in early 2007 to examine the four questions used on the Census and other surveys of Statistics Canada. Data users included National Aboriginal organizations, Aboriginal Provincial and Territorial Organizations, Federal, Provincial and local governments, researchers and Aboriginal service organizations. User feedback showed that main areas of concern were data quality, undercoverage, the wording of questions, and the importance of comparability over time.

    Release date: 2009-04-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-629-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report summarizes the main issues raised in these meetings. Four questions used to identify Aboriginal people from the Census and surveys were considered in the discussions.Statistics Canada regularly reviews the questions used on the Census and other surveys to ensure that the resulting data are representative of the population. As a first step in the process to review the questions used to produce data about First Nations, Inuit and Métis populations, regional discussions were held with more than 350 users of Aboriginal data in over 40 locations across Canada during the winter, spring and early summer of 2007.

    This report summarizes the main issues raised in these meetings. Four questions used to identify Aboriginal people from the Census and surveys were considered in the discussions.

    Release date: 2008-05-27

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-624-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Immigrants to Canada must face numerous difficulties during their first years in the country, the two most important being to find an appropriate job and language barrier. But does a better knowledge of official languages increase the chances for an immigrant of occupying a high-skilled job, a job in the intended occupation, a job similar to the one they had before immigrating, a job related to their training or field of study, or to have a higher hourly rate?

    In an attempt to answer this question, the data from the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC) were used. In the LSIC, a cohort of immigrants was interviewed at three points in time being 6 months, 2 years and 4 years after arrival in the country. For this study, we used the information about the job occupied at the time of each interview, as well as the English and French self-assessed spoken ability levels at each of these moments.

    Release date: 2007-04-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-594-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses three cycles of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to examine whether parental labour market participation and the use of substitute child-care influence the development of the skills needed by pre-school-aged children in order to begin school. The analysis in this paper is based on the arguments that parent-child interaction fosters the development of the skills needed by pre-school-aged children in order to begin school successfully, and that full-time participation in the work force by lone parents (in one-parent families) and by both parents (in dual-parent families) often results in comparatively less time for parent-child interaction than in families with a stay-at-home parent. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine whether reductions in parental time spent with children as a result of work outside the home impact the intellectual development of young children.

    The study indicates that parental participation in the labour market has little effect on the school readiness scores of most pre-school-aged children. However, children's school readiness does appear to be influenced by parental labour market participation if the parents exhibit above-average parenting skills and levels of parental education. Children of mothers who display above-average parenting skills and higher levels of education tend to benefit slightly when their mothers do not work outside the home. Likewise, children of fathers with above-average education exhibit slightly higher cognitive outcomes if their fathers work part time.

    Although the author finds that there is no association between the number of hours that children spend in child care and their level of school readiness, the study does observe that among pre-school children in substitute child-care, those who come from higher-income families tend to score higher on the school readiness tests than do children from lower-income families. This finding may be attributed to the possibility that children in higher-income families are exposed to a higher quality of substitute child-care, or it may be attributed simply to the advantages of growing up in a family with greater resources.

    Release date: 2003-10-23

  • Journals and periodicals: 82F0077X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The objective of this working paper series is to analyse the comparability of surveys conducted by Statistics Canada on smoking, to highlight the changes in the data among data years and to illustrate their statistical significance. The aim is to clarify any confusion regarding comparability of survey estimates of smoking prevalence and daily cigarette consumption over this period, as well as to provide the user-requested data in a technical but understandable format.

    Release date: 2002-12-16

  • Journals and periodicals: 85F0035X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A comparison of crime rates between Canada and the United States is often sought by the media, researchers, and policy makers. Recognizing this demand, along with the methodological complexities, the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics has undertaken the task of assessing the feasibility of comparing police reported statistics between these two countries. This report compares and contrasts the specific offence definitions, classification, and scoring rules of the Canadian and American Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) surveys. Offences are organized according to the type of survey (aggregate versus incident based) and level of analysis (incident level and accused level). Where applicable, the discussion notes modifications that could allow for reliable cross-national comparisons. The report also briefly discusses the potential of comparing detailed offence characteristics.

    Release date: 2001-07-03

  • Journals and periodicals: 61-526-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study investigates the determinants of failure for new Canadian firms. It explores the role that certain factors play in conditioning the likelihood of survival - factors related to industry structure, firm demographics and macroeconomic cycles. It asks whether the determinants of failure are different for new start-ups than for firms that have reached adolescence, and if the magnitude of these differences is economically significant. It examines whether, after controlling for certain influences, failure rates differ across industries and provinces.

    Two themes figure prominently in this analysis. The first is the impact that certain industry characteristics - such as average firm size and concentration - have on the entry/exit process, either through their influence on failure costs or on the intensity of competition. The second centres on how the dimensions of failure evolve over time as new firms gain market experience.

    Release date: 2000-02-16

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-550-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics has prepared a report on the use of remand in Canada. Remand refers to persons who have been charged with an offence and ordered by the court to custody while awaiting a further court appearance. This report uses data from the Adult Correctional Services (ACS) survey to assess the trends in remand admissions, sentence lengths, and average daily counts of remand inmates in provincial/territorial correctional facilities between 1988-89 and 1997-98. Characteristics of remand inmates (e.g., age, gender, marital status, level of education, employment), offences and criminal history were studied using data from the One-Day Snapshot report (a census of inmates on-register in adult correctional facilities on midnight Saturday October 5th 1996). Characteristics and offences of youth on remand in 1997-98 were also examined using data from the Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) survey. Trends in the average counts of youth on remand between 1988-89 and 1997-98 are presented using data from the Corrections Key Indicator Report. Appendices include graphs of admissions and average daily counts for each province and territory.

    Release date: 1999-11-25
Date modified: