Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (371) (0 to 10 of 371 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 11F0019M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series provides for the circulation of research conducted by Analytical Studies Branch staff and collaborators. The Series is intended to stimulate discussion on a variety of topics, such as labour, immigration, education and skills, income mobility, well-being, aging, firm dynamics, productivity, economic transitions, and economic geography. Readers of the Series are encouraged to contact the authors with their comments and suggestions. All the papers in the Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series go through institutional and peer review to ensure that they conform to Statistics Canada's mandate as a governmental statistical agency and adhere to generally accepted standards of good professional practice.

    Release date: 2020-07-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-632-X
    Description:

    The newsletter offers information aimed at three main groups, businesses (small to medium), communities and ethno-cultural groups/communities. Articles and outreach materials will assist their understanding of national and local data from the many relevant sources found on the Statistics Canada website.

    Release date: 2020-06-18

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202016824263
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2020-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020010
    Description:

    Studies have found that women-owned enterprises lag men-owned enterprises in business performance such as sales, profits and employment. This lower performance has been attributed to several factors like financial constraints, industrial sector or lack of prior relevant experience. However, the studies that investigated the role of prior experience often lacked detailed quantitative evidence. This paper fills this gap by taking advantage of the Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database (CEEDD) over the 2001 to 2015 period.

    Release date: 2020-06-16

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202016122586
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2020-06-09

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20201613682
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2020-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020009
    Description:

    The main objective of this paper is to determine whether the immigration status of the owner of a small or medium-sized enterprise (SME) affects the likelihood of a company implementing an innovation. This paper uses data from a survey of Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in 2011, 2014 and 2017, and asks whether immigrant-owned SMEs were more likely to innovate during the three years prior to the survey than those owned by Canadian-born individuals.

    Release date: 2020-06-09

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202014722585
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2020-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020008
    Description:

    Multinationals play an important role in the world economy because they are larger, innovate more, are more productive and pay higher wages compared with non-multinationals. Multinationals (i.e., firms that have established affiliates or subsidiaries in other countries) have played an increasingly important role in many economies. In Canada, multinationals accounted for only 0.8% of all enterprises in 2016, but they held 67% of all assets in the Canadian economy (Schaffter and Fortier-Labonté 2019). Given the importance of multinationals to the Canadian economy, it is essential for policy makers to understand the economic performance and productivity advantage of multinationals operating in Canada.

    To address policy-relevant research questions, a rich micro dataset covering all industries from 2000 to 2014 has been constructed for this study, using several administrative microdata files at Statistics Canada. This dataset is used to delve deeper into and estimate the productivity advantage of multinationals, including the selection and learning effects associated with multinationality. In addition, this study investigates whether and how research and development (R&D) investment contributes to the superior productivity performance of multinationals.

    Release date: 2020-05-26

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100018
    Description:

    The Canadian economy changed dramatically in March 2020 as a result of COVID-19 and the situation has had a profound impact on the ability of businesses in Canada to operate. In order to better understand the impact of COVID-19 on businesses, employers and employees, communities and our economy, Statistics Canada and the Canadian Chamber of Commerce collaborated to launch the Canadian Survey on Business Conditions. While the majority of businesses in Canada have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, it appears that small businesses have been hit particularly hard by this crisis.

    Release date: 2020-05-11
Stats in brief (76)

Stats in brief (76) (0 to 10 of 76 results)

Articles and reports (280)

Articles and reports (280) (0 to 10 of 280 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020010
    Description:

    Studies have found that women-owned enterprises lag men-owned enterprises in business performance such as sales, profits and employment. This lower performance has been attributed to several factors like financial constraints, industrial sector or lack of prior relevant experience. However, the studies that investigated the role of prior experience often lacked detailed quantitative evidence. This paper fills this gap by taking advantage of the Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database (CEEDD) over the 2001 to 2015 period.

    Release date: 2020-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020009
    Description:

    The main objective of this paper is to determine whether the immigration status of the owner of a small or medium-sized enterprise (SME) affects the likelihood of a company implementing an innovation. This paper uses data from a survey of Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in 2011, 2014 and 2017, and asks whether immigrant-owned SMEs were more likely to innovate during the three years prior to the survey than those owned by Canadian-born individuals.

    Release date: 2020-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020008
    Description:

    Multinationals play an important role in the world economy because they are larger, innovate more, are more productive and pay higher wages compared with non-multinationals. Multinationals (i.e., firms that have established affiliates or subsidiaries in other countries) have played an increasingly important role in many economies. In Canada, multinationals accounted for only 0.8% of all enterprises in 2016, but they held 67% of all assets in the Canadian economy (Schaffter and Fortier-Labonté 2019). Given the importance of multinationals to the Canadian economy, it is essential for policy makers to understand the economic performance and productivity advantage of multinationals operating in Canada.

    To address policy-relevant research questions, a rich micro dataset covering all industries from 2000 to 2014 has been constructed for this study, using several administrative microdata files at Statistics Canada. This dataset is used to delve deeper into and estimate the productivity advantage of multinationals, including the selection and learning effects associated with multinationality. In addition, this study investigates whether and how research and development (R&D) investment contributes to the superior productivity performance of multinationals.

    Release date: 2020-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020006
    Description:

    This paper examines the role of firm characteristics in accounting for the between-firm average employment earnings dispersion in the Canadian business sector between 2002 and 2015. It uses two decomposition methods to analyze the level of and changes in the between-firm average employment earnings dispersion by firm characteristics, such as productivity, globalization status (importing, exporting, foreign ownership), technology intensity, firm size, firm age, industry and geographic region.

    Release date: 2020-02-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020007
    Description:

    The dispersion of earnings among workers may come from multiple sources. It may reflect differences in workers’ characteristics, such as education and experience. It may also be because workers are employed at different firms that pay differently. Recent studies from other countries have found that firms play an important role in explaining earnings disparities among workers, often through the link between productivity and pay. However, there has been no Canadian evidence on the link between the earnings dispersion and firm differences because of a lack of matched employer–employee data. This paper presents developments in the dispersion of individuals’ earnings in Canada and examines the potential of firm characteristics to account for this dispersion and changes in this dispersion in the post-2000 period using the Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database.

    Release date: 2020-02-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020005
    Description:

    Understanding intangible investments is essential for providing accurate measures of gross fixed capital formation (GFCF), gross domestic product (GDP) and productivity growth, and for understanding the innovation system. Statistical agencies need measures of intangible investment to produce economic statistics on aggregate activity that accurately measure concepts such as GDP, GFCF or savings. The levels of GDP, GFCF and savings will be underestimated to the extent that expenditures are incorrectly classified as intermediate inputs that are fully consumed during the period being measured—and not as investments that are not fully consumed during the period when the expenditures are incurred. Estimates for GDP and productivity growth rates may be similarly underestimated. This paper updates and expands upon the intangible capital estimates presented by Baldwin et al. (2009), who extended already measured intangibles (i.e., research and development [R&D], software, mineral exploration) to include additional asset classes consistent with international research on intangible capital measurement (see Corrado, Hulten and Sichel 2009).

    Release date: 2020-02-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020001
    Description:

    Multifactor productivity (MFP) declined in Canada from 2000 to 2009 and then recovered after. The movements in productivity since 2000 have attracted great attention from researchers and policy makers because productivity is important both for economic growth and for improvements in living standards. This paper applies the stochastic frontier framework to decompose each firm’s MFP into two parts: its technological frontier and its technical efficiency. Change in the aggregate technological frontier refers to improvements in the productivity potential of an economy, i.e., the maximum productivity of an economy if all firms are fully efficient. Aggregate technical efficiency reflects the economy’s capacity to achieve that potential. The results of this decomposition can show whether the movements in productivity after 2000 in Canada were mainly the result of changes in the technological frontier and productivity potential or of changes in the technical efficiency.

    Release date: 2020-01-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020002
    Description:

    Labour productivity growth in the business sector in Canada started to decline in 2000, from 2.3% per year in the period from 1991 to 2000 to 1.0% per year in the period from 2000 to 2015. This paper examines how innovation, innovation diffusion across firms, and business dynamism affected the productivity slowdown.

    Release date: 2020-01-17

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201900100012
    Description:

    The Activities of Multinational Enterprises in Canada program describes the characteristics, activity, financial position and performance of multinational and non-multinational enterprises in Canada. This paper focuses specifically on the characteristics of employment at foreign and Canadian multinational enterprises operating in Canada, by province and industry. This study focuses specifically on the employment characteristics in Canada, by province and industry, of foreign MNEs, Canadian MNEs and non-MNE corporations.

    Release date: 2019-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 18-001-X2019002
    Description:

    This study provides a broad understanding of the business environments in Indigenous communities - First Nations and Inuit - across Canada. These communities are typically located in rural low density or remote areas. The analysis profiles businesses located in Indigenous communities and compares them with businesses located in Non-Indigenous communities with similar population size parameters; hence, this analysis uses a geographic concept (i.e., the type of community) to connect the business dimension with the Indigenous dimension, as opposed to businesses whose ownership identifies as indigenous.

    The profile is based on a set of straightforward business indicators, including business counts, entry and exit, age, revenue and profit indicators, which are tabulated by various classes of businesses defined for the study (industry groupings, employment size, revenue size, etc.). Some tables also feature province and territory geography. All business data are from Statistics Canada's Business Register (BR) January 2017 reference period. The 2011 Census geography is used as the January 2017 BR is based on that classification. The tables are presented by type of community. The results highlight both differences and similarities between the business environments of Indigenous communities and included Non-Indigenous communities.

    Release date: 2019-08-28
Journals and periodicals (15)

Journals and periodicals (15) (0 to 10 of 15 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 11F0019M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series provides for the circulation of research conducted by Analytical Studies Branch staff and collaborators. The Series is intended to stimulate discussion on a variety of topics, such as labour, immigration, education and skills, income mobility, well-being, aging, firm dynamics, productivity, economic transitions, and economic geography. Readers of the Series are encouraged to contact the authors with their comments and suggestions. All the papers in the Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series go through institutional and peer review to ensure that they conform to Statistics Canada's mandate as a governmental statistical agency and adhere to generally accepted standards of good professional practice.

    Release date: 2020-07-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-632-X
    Description:

    The newsletter offers information aimed at three main groups, businesses (small to medium), communities and ethno-cultural groups/communities. Articles and outreach materials will assist their understanding of national and local data from the many relevant sources found on the Statistics Canada website.

    Release date: 2020-06-18

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-402-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Presented in almanac style, the 2012 Canada Year Book contains more than 500 pages of tables, charts and succinct analytical articles on every major area of Statistics Canada's expertise. The Canada Year Book is the premier reference on the social and economic life of Canada and its citizens.

    Release date: 2012-12-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-010-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This monthly periodical is Statistics Canada's flagship publication for economic statistics. Each issue contains a monthly summary of the economy, major economic events and a feature article. A statistical summary contains a wide range of tables and graphs on the principal economic indicators for Canada, the provinces and the major industrial nations. A historical listing of this same data is contained in the Canadian economic observer: historical supplement (Catalogue no. 11-210-XPB and XIB).

    Release date: 2012-06-15

  • Journals and periodicals: 63-016-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Services indicators is a quarterly publication which profiles the services industries. Each edition carries two in-depth analytical feature articles. In addition, each issue contains 34 updated tables and nearly 100 charts based on various service industries' output, finances, employment and remuneration data over the most recent eight quarters. The following services industries are covered: communications; finance, insurance and real estate; business services; traveler accommodations and food services; and leisure and personal services.

    Release date: 2004-01-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 54F0001X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada's major container ports have competed successfully against their U.S. counterparts for overseas container traffic. However, the ocean container shipping industry is undergoing changes that will impact on their relationships with ports and competition among ports for container traffic has been fierce. This paper explores how Canadian ports might fare in this increasingly competitive environment, based on their natural and man-made attributes, their competitive stance and their potential to meet the evolving ocean container industry.

    The assessment includes a review of the ocean container shipping industry, the North American container market and competing ports in the United States (U.S.). This report uses data from two sources, Statistics Canada's marine international origin/destination (O/D) database and the U.S. Department of Transport Maritime Administration's (MARAD) Annual Import Export Waterborne Databank which is based on Journal of Commerce P.I.E.R.S. data.

    The keys to the success of Canadian container ports have been a combination of natural endowments, investments in intermodal facilities and competitive pricing. These factors are likely to continue into the future, however, the competition among container ports is likely to intensify as industry consolidation continues and as publicly funded U.S. intermodal terminal and corridor projects come to fruition.

    Release date: 2003-06-09

  • 7. Canada E-Book Archived
    Journals and periodicals: 11-404-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Canada e-Book is an online version of the Canada Year Book with texts, tables, charts and audio clips that present the country's economic and social trends. The Canada e-Book illustrates Canada and Canadians under four broad headings: The Land, The People, The Economy, and The State. You will find a wealth of information on topics including the human imprint on the environment, population and demography, health, education, household and family life, labour force, arts and leisure, industries, finance, government and justice. All Canadians will enjoy this useful reference that helps explain the social, economic and cultural forces that shape our nation.

    Release date: 2003-05-26

  • Journals and periodicals: 16F0024X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Businesses today are involved in a variety of practices aimed at preventing or reducing environmental degradation generated from their production activity. During the 1990s, the environmental regulation context changed. Increasingly, governments have relied on voluntary initiatives undertaken by businesses to reduce pollutants and waste, as opposed to regulations. However, at the same time, the federal authorities have undertaken to revise the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA), in order to increase federal power for environmental regulation but with strong emphasis put on promoting pollution prevention. Consequently, businesses today are looking at alternative ways to limit impacts from their operations on the environment.

    Environmental Management and Technologies in the Business Sector presents a profile of business demand for environmental processes and technologies, pollution prevention methods and environmental practices, such as environmental management systems and voluntary actions. What types of treatment processes are the most popular ones for reducing gas emissions, liquid, solid and hazardous waste, noise, radiation and vibration, for saving energy or for site reclamation? What is the market for environmental processes and technologies? What pollution prevention methods are used more frequently? What additional environmental practices have businesses adopted (for instance, are voluntary programs more popular than eco-labelling?)?

    This paper is based on results from the Survey of Environmental Protection Expenditures. For the first time, the survey asked detailed questions on the type of environmental process or technology used and the adoption of environmental practices. The paper is a complement to both 1996-1997 and 1998 Environmental Protection Expenditures in the Business Sector reports (Catalogue no. 16F0006XIE).

    Release date: 2002-12-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 51F0009X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Since September 11, 2001, important changes in the financial and operating statistics of airline activities in Canada have taken place. In particular, most airline companies have seen a deterioration of their financial positions and the number of flights and of seats available have generally decreased while security measures have increased. The aim of this paper is to examine the post-September 11 aviation market in Canada with respect to one key operating characteristic: the number of flights of airline companies operating in Canada. More specifically, the following questions are addressed: Was there a recovery in airline activities in Canada since September 11? Were all losses in all sectors recovered (domestic, transborder and international)? Were all losses at all airports recovered?

    This paper is divided into three sections: 1. Data sources and limitations, the scope of this research and the methodological approach used are described in the first section. 2. The second section highlights the main results obtained and discusses these results in the context of the recent trends in airline activities in Canada. 3. Lastly, some conclusions are offered, based on the evidence collected and analysed.

    Release date: 2002-12-05

  • 10. Insights on ... Archived
    Journals and periodicals: 61F0019X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This on-line product Insights on... is a newsletter from Statistics Canada highlighting trends in business and trade statistics. Using information from the latest Statistics Canada surveys, Insights on... provides factual analysis of emerging trends in Canadian industry, documents what's new in Canadian business, and shows how businesses are responding to the challenges and opportunities posed by new types of business practices - globalization, new technologies, increasingly competitive markets, uncompromising standards of product quality, etc.

    Each edition of Insights on... will deal with one or two topics. Non-technical analysis and user-friendly graphs will provide a complete and balanced interpretation of the facts - quickly, clearly and concisely.

    Release date: 2000-06-15
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