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All (15) (0 to 10 of 15 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20150133456
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060019107
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Some technological innovations are more apparent than others; the introduction of digital satellite television and wireless cable was one of the most obvious.

    Release date: 2006-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060019108
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Just as the cable industry was poised to realize the full extent of investments made in its networks by offering local telephony in a number of Canadian markets, it seems to have put an end to the erosion of its traditional customer base. This may be a sign that the industry is reaping the benefits of a customer loyalty strategy founded on product and technological innovation.

    Release date: 2006-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    It is difficult to imagine, particularly for younger Canadians, that mobile telecommunications devices were a curiosity only 20 years ago. In fact, mobile communications were not that common as recently as 10 years ago when less than 2 million devices were connected to our wireless networks. While the rate of adoption of the Internet in Canada is one of the highest in the world and the rate of adoption of satellite television is showing signs of a slowdown, there still seems to be considerable potential for growth in the wireless telecommunications industry.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada has been a connected nation for many years. The penetration of basic telephone service and of cable services have been and remain amongst the highest in the world. The networks most used by Canadians are the wireline telephone network, the cable television network, the wireless telephone network, the Internet, and the satellite and MDS television networks. This article highlights the amazing speed at which connectivity is evolving.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037430
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article describes the increasing penetration of direct-to-home satellite, wireless and digital cable television technologies.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016795
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    From the early 1950s to the mid-1990s, cable companies were the only businesses offering multi-channel video services, and these services represented much of their revenues. The penetration of cable services grew steadily over the period and peaked in the early 1990s. The introduction of competition from wireless operators has given new life to the industry and its clientele has expanded by more than 20% from 1997 to 2002. Wireless operator companies, which had virtually no customers in 1997, have captured a substantial share of the multi-channel video market. Cable operators have diversified and now play a major role in the Internet access market. Digital technology is gradually displacing analogue technologies.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-508-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This volume is Statistics Canada's second compendium publication on the subject of information and communications technologies (ICTs) in Canada. It builds on the material provided in our first compendium publication, Networked Canada: Beyond the information highway, as well as the ongoing Connectedness Series. It also goes one step further by representing a comprehensive compilation of measurements and analyses from diverse areas across the Agency. It traces the evolution of our economy and highlights many facets of our society's transformation.

    Part 1 offers a profile of Canada's ICT sector, including key indicators of change. Changes occurring in individual industries that supply ICT goods and services are also analysed.

    Part 2 addresses economy-wide issues (including health, education and justice) from a sectoral approach, covering ICT diffusion and utilization among business, households and governments.

    Part 3 offers a collection of thematic analyses focussing on topical issues of the Information Society. These include the high-tech labour market, information technology (IT) occupations, the digital divide, telecommunications services, broadband use and deployment, and the use of ICTs by cultural industries.

    Part 4 examines Canada's international involvement in the Information Society. Contributions from policy departments offer an account of the Canadian role in promoting a global Information Society, with particular emphasis on assistance to developing countries.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036653
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are changing the way individuals and organizations access, exchange and use information. The Internet puts a wealth of information and entertainment at its users' fingertips, wireless technologies allow communication and information exchange from almost anywhere at any time, and broadband networks pave the way for applications unheard of only a few years ago. This article looks at some of the fundamental changes that have affected the cable industry in the recent past and examines some of the challenges and opportunities it faces in coming years.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2003010
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper quantifies the demand for and supply of broadband Internet technologies in Canada. It also examines broadband investment, supply and availability.

    Release date: 2003-09-23
Stats in brief (1)

Stats in brief (1) ((1 result))

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20150133456
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-01-13
Articles and reports (11)

Articles and reports (11) (0 to 10 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060019107
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Some technological innovations are more apparent than others; the introduction of digital satellite television and wireless cable was one of the most obvious.

    Release date: 2006-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060019108
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Just as the cable industry was poised to realize the full extent of investments made in its networks by offering local telephony in a number of Canadian markets, it seems to have put an end to the erosion of its traditional customer base. This may be a sign that the industry is reaping the benefits of a customer loyalty strategy founded on product and technological innovation.

    Release date: 2006-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    It is difficult to imagine, particularly for younger Canadians, that mobile telecommunications devices were a curiosity only 20 years ago. In fact, mobile communications were not that common as recently as 10 years ago when less than 2 million devices were connected to our wireless networks. While the rate of adoption of the Internet in Canada is one of the highest in the world and the rate of adoption of satellite television is showing signs of a slowdown, there still seems to be considerable potential for growth in the wireless telecommunications industry.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada has been a connected nation for many years. The penetration of basic telephone service and of cable services have been and remain amongst the highest in the world. The networks most used by Canadians are the wireline telephone network, the cable television network, the wireless telephone network, the Internet, and the satellite and MDS television networks. This article highlights the amazing speed at which connectivity is evolving.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037430
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article describes the increasing penetration of direct-to-home satellite, wireless and digital cable television technologies.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016795
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    From the early 1950s to the mid-1990s, cable companies were the only businesses offering multi-channel video services, and these services represented much of their revenues. The penetration of cable services grew steadily over the period and peaked in the early 1990s. The introduction of competition from wireless operators has given new life to the industry and its clientele has expanded by more than 20% from 1997 to 2002. Wireless operator companies, which had virtually no customers in 1997, have captured a substantial share of the multi-channel video market. Cable operators have diversified and now play a major role in the Internet access market. Digital technology is gradually displacing analogue technologies.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036653
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are changing the way individuals and organizations access, exchange and use information. The Internet puts a wealth of information and entertainment at its users' fingertips, wireless technologies allow communication and information exchange from almost anywhere at any time, and broadband networks pave the way for applications unheard of only a few years ago. This article looks at some of the fundamental changes that have affected the cable industry in the recent past and examines some of the challenges and opportunities it faces in coming years.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2003010
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper quantifies the demand for and supply of broadband Internet technologies in Canada. It also examines broadband investment, supply and availability.

    Release date: 2003-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030016470
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Wireless operators (satellite and multipoint distribution systems) had captured 17.0% of the video programming delivery market at the end of August 2001, up significantly from 10.8% in 2000, and more than double the level of about 6.5% in 1999.

    Release date: 2003-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035969
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For many years, the cable industry comprised territorial monopolies providing their customers with basic television programming services in a regulated environment. Learn how this situation has evolved in the last few years.

    Release date: 2001-10-31
Journals and periodicals (3)

Journals and periodicals (3) ((3 results))

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-508-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This volume is Statistics Canada's second compendium publication on the subject of information and communications technologies (ICTs) in Canada. It builds on the material provided in our first compendium publication, Networked Canada: Beyond the information highway, as well as the ongoing Connectedness Series. It also goes one step further by representing a comprehensive compilation of measurements and analyses from diverse areas across the Agency. It traces the evolution of our economy and highlights many facets of our society's transformation.

    Part 1 offers a profile of Canada's ICT sector, including key indicators of change. Changes occurring in individual industries that supply ICT goods and services are also analysed.

    Part 2 addresses economy-wide issues (including health, education and justice) from a sectoral approach, covering ICT diffusion and utilization among business, households and governments.

    Part 3 offers a collection of thematic analyses focussing on topical issues of the Information Society. These include the high-tech labour market, information technology (IT) occupations, the digital divide, telecommunications services, broadband use and deployment, and the use of ICTs by cultural industries.

    Part 4 examines Canada's international involvement in the Information Society. Contributions from policy departments offer an account of the Canadian role in promoting a global Information Society, with particular emphasis on assistance to developing countries.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-506-X
    Description:

    Information and communications technologies in Canada is designed to profile the growth and development of the Canadian information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. The publication provides a statistical overview of the ICT sector on the basis of key economic variables, including production, employment, international trade, revenue and research and development expenditures.

    Statistics Canada's first quantification of the ICT sector appeared in the compendium publication entitled Networked Canada: beyond the information highway, catalogue no. 56-504-XIE. This publication updates these estimates with the most recent data, while providing improved industrial coverage and in-depth analysis of Canada's ICT sector.

    Many different data sources have been used throughout the project, and while all efforts have been made to maximize the amount of data available, it has not been possible in all instances to consistently report for all ICT industries and all relevant variables. The conversion to the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) has largely contributed to these difficulties, and it is expected that a greater range of data will be available once all of the survey programs begin reporting on the basis of this new industry classification.

    Release date: 2001-12-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-504-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Networked Canada is the first comprehensive compendium to be published by Statistics Canada on the information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. The compendium has been designed as a profile of the information society, focusing on current trends, as well as an historical overview of the growth and development of the Canadian ICT sector industries. The publication contains two main parts. The first provides a statistical overview of the ICT sector on the basis of key economic variables, including production, employment, international trade, revenue and R&D expenditure. A summary of international ICT sector comparisons for selected variables, using recent data published by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is also included here. The ever widening use of, and access to ICTs in the home, at work, in schools and by governments is examined in the second part.

    Many different data sources have been used throughout the project, and while all efforts have been made to maximize the amount of data available, it has not been possible in all instances to consistently report for all ICT industries and all relevant variables. The conversion to the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) has largely contributed to these difficulties, and it is expected that a greater range of data will be available once all of the survey programs begin reporting on the basis of this new industry classification.

    Release date: 2001-04-27
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