Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (273) (0 to 10 of 273 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2021049
    Description:

    The 2020 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) measures the impact of digital technologies on the lives of Canadians, including how individuals access and use the Internet, their intensity of use, demand for certain online activities, and interactions online as well as the changes in use of digital tech as a result of COVID-19. This infographic examines Canadians use of the Internet and digital technologies as well as certain online activities done for the first time during COVID-19.

    Release date: 2021-09-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-654-X2021001
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey on Accessibility in Federal Sector Organizations (SAFSO), this fact sheet examines the accessibility barriers that persons with difficulties or long-term conditions encountered during their interactions with federally regulated organizations or businesses. It provides information on the overall prevalence of encountering a barrier as well as specifically looking at the barriers related to the area of transportation, information and communication technologies (ICT) and communication. Each section is examined by several characteristics, including age group, gender, type of difficulty, sexual orientation, and income.

    Release date: 2021-08-18

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202100100027
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted the behaviours of Canadians, particularly regarding their online activities. Using data from the 2020 Canadian Internet Use Survey, this article examines several Internet-related activities Canadians have done more often during the pandemic.

    Release date: 2021-06-24

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20211734208
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2021-06-22

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2021048
    Description:

    The 2020 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) measures the impact of digital technologies on the lives of Canadians, including how individuals access and use the Internet, their intensity of use, demand for certain online activities such as e-commerce and barriers to shopping online. This infographic examines what Canadians have reported about their online spending behaviours.

    Release date: 2021-06-22

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20211302896
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2021-05-10

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202111821285
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2021-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100300004
    Description:

    This study uses the 2018 Canadian Internet Use Survey to examine reports of the negative effects individuals aged 15 to 64 experience because of their use of social networking websites or apps. Social media refers to digital platforms that allow users to create and share content (e.g., text-based posts, photos and videos) and online profiles, and to interact with other users. In 2018, social media was regularly used by about 9 in 10 Canadians aged 15 to 34, 8 in 10 of those aged 35 to 49, and 6 in 10 of those aged 50 to 64.

    Release date: 2021-03-24

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2021036
    Description:

    This infographic describes the intensity of Canadians' reported use of social media and the negative effects they associate with that use, such as: lost sleep, trouble concentrating on tasks or activities, and feeling anxious or depressed.

    Release date: 2021-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100200001
    Description:

    While Canada has embraced digital technologies rapidly and broadly over the past two decades, there is no doubt that the adoption of digital technologies has been amplified and accelerated as a result of the COVID-19 crisis. This article compares the economic performance of sectors where digital inputs have been used more intensively in the production process (digitally-intensive sectors) to that of remaining sectors (non digitally-intensive sectors).

    Release date: 2021-02-24
Stats in brief (59)

Stats in brief (59) (0 to 10 of 59 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2021049
    Description:

    The 2020 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) measures the impact of digital technologies on the lives of Canadians, including how individuals access and use the Internet, their intensity of use, demand for certain online activities, and interactions online as well as the changes in use of digital tech as a result of COVID-19. This infographic examines Canadians use of the Internet and digital technologies as well as certain online activities done for the first time during COVID-19.

    Release date: 2021-09-07

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202100100027
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted the behaviours of Canadians, particularly regarding their online activities. Using data from the 2020 Canadian Internet Use Survey, this article examines several Internet-related activities Canadians have done more often during the pandemic.

    Release date: 2021-06-24

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20211734208
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2021-06-22

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2021048
    Description:

    The 2020 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) measures the impact of digital technologies on the lives of Canadians, including how individuals access and use the Internet, their intensity of use, demand for certain online activities such as e-commerce and barriers to shopping online. This infographic examines what Canadians have reported about their online spending behaviours.

    Release date: 2021-06-22

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20211302896
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2021-05-10

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202111821285
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2021-04-28

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2021036
    Description:

    This infographic describes the intensity of Canadians' reported use of social media and the negative effects they associate with that use, such as: lost sleep, trouble concentrating on tasks or activities, and feeling anxious or depressed.

    Release date: 2021-03-24

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202105528723
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2021-02-24

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2020088
    Description:

    Using a custom tabulation of data from the Monthly Retail Trade Survey, this infographic provides a graphical analysis of retail e-commerce vs. in-store sales for selected industries in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Release date: 2021-02-05

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2021006
    Description:

    This infographic highlights some of the results of the 2019 Survey of Household Spending. It shows how Canadian households allocated their spending to various categories of goods and services. It also presents average spending on principal accommodation in selected Canadian cities. Finally, it shows how Internet access, and cell phone and landline use have changed over time.

    Release date: 2021-01-22
Articles and reports (202)

Articles and reports (202) (0 to 10 of 202 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-654-X2021001
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey on Accessibility in Federal Sector Organizations (SAFSO), this fact sheet examines the accessibility barriers that persons with difficulties or long-term conditions encountered during their interactions with federally regulated organizations or businesses. It provides information on the overall prevalence of encountering a barrier as well as specifically looking at the barriers related to the area of transportation, information and communication technologies (ICT) and communication. Each section is examined by several characteristics, including age group, gender, type of difficulty, sexual orientation, and income.

    Release date: 2021-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100300004
    Description:

    This study uses the 2018 Canadian Internet Use Survey to examine reports of the negative effects individuals aged 15 to 64 experience because of their use of social networking websites or apps. Social media refers to digital platforms that allow users to create and share content (e.g., text-based posts, photos and videos) and online profiles, and to interact with other users. In 2018, social media was regularly used by about 9 in 10 Canadians aged 15 to 34, 8 in 10 of those aged 35 to 49, and 6 in 10 of those aged 50 to 64.

    Release date: 2021-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100200001
    Description:

    While Canada has embraced digital technologies rapidly and broadly over the past two decades, there is no doubt that the adoption of digital technologies has been amplified and accelerated as a result of the COVID-19 crisis. This article compares the economic performance of sectors where digital inputs have been used more intensively in the production process (digitally-intensive sectors) to that of remaining sectors (non digitally-intensive sectors).

    Release date: 2021-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100200003
    Description:

    Over the past two decades, Canadians have embraced digital technologies at an unprecedented pace and breadth. The objective of this study is to develop statistical indexes to measure the intensity of digitalization in Canadian industries. Because of the ubiquitous presence of digitalization and businesses’ and individuals’ increasing reliance on digital products and services, it is essential to measure the digitalization in the Canadian economy to better understand its impact so that governments, businesses and other stakeholders can make informed decisions.

    Release date: 2021-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X202000100005
    Description:

    Digital delivery is one of four primary modes of supplying services to another country, alongside in-person delivery, either through the customer or the supplier traveling to their counterpart, or by establishing a commercial presence in the other country. As part of Statistics Canada’s strategy to measure how digitalisation is enabling, transforming and disrupting international trade in services, enterprises in Canada were asked for the first time for reference year 2018 to provide the share of their exports of 15 distinct commercial services that had been delivered remotely, of which digital delivery is the primary mechanism. Provided to services exporters through a supplementary survey module within Statistics Canada’s International transactions in commercial services, this new data source for digital trade in services is the result of extensive collaboration between Statistics Canada and Canada’s export community, its US counterparts in economic statistics, such as the Bureau of Economic Analysis, and regional and international organizations – notably the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the World Trade Organisation and Eurostat. This article discusses a primary metric derived from this new survey module - the digital intensity of Canada’s 2018 commercial services exports with analysis of exporters by service category, industry, size class, type of multinational, and trading partner. In doing so, Statistics Canada continues to make progress along the continuum of measuring digital trade and this paper on digital delivery of Canada’s services exports serves as a contribution on Canada’s measurement of trade in services by mode of supply.

    Release date: 2020-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X202000100006
    Description:

    Based on data from the 2018 Study on International Money Transfers, this study examines the money transfer methods used by immigrants and non-permanent residents to send money to relatives or friends living outside Canada. The target population includes Canadian residents born in official development assistance-eligible countries in 2017, the majority of whom were immigrants from low- and middle-income countries. It first examines differences in sending fees between non-electronic and electronic money transfer methods by region of destination. It also examines the factors associated with the use of EMT methods versus traditional methods.

    Release date: 2020-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 89-28-0001201800100015
    Description:

    This Just the Facts article highlights statistics on cybercrime and cybersecurity from a police (Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, 2018), business (Canadian Survey of Cyber Security and Cybercrime, 2017), and individual (Canadian Internet Use Survey, 2018) perspective.

    Release date: 2019-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 89-28-0001201800100016
    Description:

    This Just the Facts article provides a statistical portrait highlighting ecommerce activity in Canada. The data will draw mainly from the recently released Canadian Internet Use Survey 2018.

    Release date: 2019-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2019008
    Description:

    The rise of the digital economy presents new challenges to the measurement of price change, driven by the increasing popularity of online shopping and the availability of new consumer goods and services. Consumption patterns as well as the behaviour of online prices, compared to those collected in-store, must be considered in the context of consumer price inflation.

    This analytical article explores the impact of e-commerce on the monthly Consumer Price Index (CPI) and discusses how price collection and methods are evolving in the context of an increasingly digitalized retail landscape.

    Release date: 2019-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201900100009
    Description:

    In this paper a preliminary set of statistical estimates of the amounts invested in Canadian data, databases and data science in recent years are presented. The results indicate rapid growth in investment in data, databases and data science over the last three decades and a significant accumulation of these kinds of capital over time.

    Release date: 2019-07-10
Journals and periodicals (12)

Journals and periodicals (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-402-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Presented in almanac style, the 2012 Canada Year Book contains more than 500 pages of tables, charts and succinct analytical articles on every major area of Statistics Canada's expertise. The Canada Year Book is the premier reference on the social and economic life of Canada and its citizens.

    Release date: 2012-12-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-222-X
    Description:

    This annual publication is based on the Survey of Intellectual Property Commercialization in the Higher Education Sector which tracks the progress of innovation in this area.

    The objective of the survey is to assure the availability of pertinent information to monitor science and technology related activities and to support the development of science and technology policy. The topic studied is intellectual property management at universities and affiliated teaching hospitals. The data are used to determine how to maximize the benefits resulting from public sector research. Data users include the federal and provincial governments and university administrators and researchers.

    Release date: 2010-08-23

  • Journals and periodicals: 56F0004M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Connectedness series publishes analytical studies as well as research reports in the broad area of connectedness. This includes the industrial areas of telecommunications, broadcasting, computer services and Internet Service Providers as well as cross economy activities such as the Internet and electronic commerce. It offers a statistical perspective in these emerging phenomena that are changing the economic and societal landscape of the country.

    All papers are subject to peer and institutional review as well as review by subject matter experts, as necessary.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-002-X
    Description:

    This publication presents quarterly and year-to-date data as aggregated from reports for the major wireline and wireless telecommunications systems in Canada. Information is provided on operating revenue and expenses, salaries and wage payments, number of employees, capital expenditures, network PSTN (Public Switched Telephone Network) access lines, non-PSTN lines, wireless subscribers and traffic statistics.

    Release date: 2006-05-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-508-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This volume is Statistics Canada's second compendium publication on the subject of information and communications technologies (ICTs) in Canada. It builds on the material provided in our first compendium publication, Networked Canada: Beyond the information highway, as well as the ongoing Connectedness Series. It also goes one step further by representing a comprehensive compilation of measurements and analyses from diverse areas across the Agency. It traces the evolution of our economy and highlights many facets of our society's transformation.

    Part 1 offers a profile of Canada's ICT sector, including key indicators of change. Changes occurring in individual industries that supply ICT goods and services are also analysed.

    Part 2 addresses economy-wide issues (including health, education and justice) from a sectoral approach, covering ICT diffusion and utilization among business, households and governments.

    Part 3 offers a collection of thematic analyses focussing on topical issues of the Information Society. These include the high-tech labour market, information technology (IT) occupations, the digital divide, telecommunications services, broadband use and deployment, and the use of ICTs by cultural industries.

    Part 4 examines Canada's international involvement in the Information Society. Contributions from policy departments offer an account of the Canadian role in promoting a global Information Society, with particular emphasis on assistance to developing countries.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-597-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper provides a descriptive analysis of issues related to the access and use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) among Canadian youth. In particular, this research examines the extent to which inequities in the use and access of ICT exist among Canadian high school students, based on gender, socio-economic status and rural-urban location. Three datasets have been used to study this issue: the Canadian portion of the Second International Technology in Education Study (SITES), an international survey which measures schools' use of technological resources; the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), which was conducted in conjunction with the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA); and Cycle 14 of the General Social Survey (GSS), which focusses specifically on issues related to ICT access and use.The results of these analyses suggest that there is a 'digital divide' among Canadian youth, in terms of access to and experience with ICT. Rural youth are less likely to have access to computers in the home; however, frequency of use and perceived competency levels are not compromised by this trend. Female youth and those from families with low levels of parental education are also less likely to have access to computers in their homes. These groups tend to spend less time on the computer and report lower levels of computer skills competency.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • 7. Canada E-Book Archived
    Journals and periodicals: 11-404-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Canada e-Book is an online version of the Canada Year Book with texts, tables, charts and audio clips that present the country's economic and social trends. The Canada e-Book illustrates Canada and Canadians under four broad headings: The Land, The People, The Economy, and The State. You will find a wealth of information on topics including the human imprint on the environment, population and demography, health, education, household and family life, labour force, arts and leisure, industries, finance, government and justice. All Canadians will enjoy this useful reference that helps explain the social, economic and cultural forces that shape our nation.

    Release date: 2003-05-26

  • Journals and periodicals: 56F0009X
    Description:

    This is a condensed version of the study Unveiling the digital divide (Connectedness series), catalogue no. 56F0004MIE no. 7, and covers the same subject matter. The digital divide, commonly understood as the gap between information and communications technology (ICT) 'haves' and 'have-nots', has emerged as an important issue of our times, largely due to the uneven diffusion of the Internet.

    Many variables, including income, education, age and geographical location, exert significant influences on household penetration of both ICT and non-ICT commodities. Thus, divides can be defined for any permutation of the above. In the case of ICTs, divides depend on the specific technology, its timing of introduction, as well as the variable of interest.

    This study shows that the digital divide is sizeable; ICT penetration rates grow with income. Generally, the effect of income is larger on newer ICTs (Internet, computers, cell phones) than older and established ones (television, telephone). Then, using the Internet penetration of households by detailed income level, it finds that in an overall sense the Internet divide is slowly closing. This, however, is the result of the accelerated adoption of the Internet by middle-income households - particularly upper middle. The Internet divide is widening when the lowest income deciles are compared with the highest income decile.

    At the same time, the rates of growth of Internet adoption among lower-income households exceed those of higher-income households. This is typical of penetration patterns of ICT and non-ICT commodities. Rates of growth are initially very high among high-income groups, but at later stages it is the penetration of lower-income groups that grows faster.

    Release date: 2002-10-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-506-X
    Description:

    Information and communications technologies in Canada is designed to profile the growth and development of the Canadian information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. The publication provides a statistical overview of the ICT sector on the basis of key economic variables, including production, employment, international trade, revenue and research and development expenditures.

    Statistics Canada's first quantification of the ICT sector appeared in the compendium publication entitled Networked Canada: beyond the information highway, catalogue no. 56-504-XIE. This publication updates these estimates with the most recent data, while providing improved industrial coverage and in-depth analysis of Canada's ICT sector.

    Many different data sources have been used throughout the project, and while all efforts have been made to maximize the amount of data available, it has not been possible in all instances to consistently report for all ICT industries and all relevant variables. The conversion to the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) has largely contributed to these difficulties, and it is expected that a greater range of data will be available once all of the survey programs begin reporting on the basis of this new industry classification.

    Release date: 2001-12-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-504-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Networked Canada is the first comprehensive compendium to be published by Statistics Canada on the information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. The compendium has been designed as a profile of the information society, focusing on current trends, as well as an historical overview of the growth and development of the Canadian ICT sector industries. The publication contains two main parts. The first provides a statistical overview of the ICT sector on the basis of key economic variables, including production, employment, international trade, revenue and R&D expenditure. A summary of international ICT sector comparisons for selected variables, using recent data published by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is also included here. The ever widening use of, and access to ICTs in the home, at work, in schools and by governments is examined in the second part.

    Many different data sources have been used throughout the project, and while all efforts have been made to maximize the amount of data available, it has not been possible in all instances to consistently report for all ICT industries and all relevant variables. The conversion to the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) has largely contributed to these difficulties, and it is expected that a greater range of data will be available once all of the survey programs begin reporting on the basis of this new industry classification.

    Release date: 2001-04-27
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