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  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100016
    Description:

    Based on integrated data from the 2006 and 2016 censuses, this study examines the educational outcomes of a cohort of children with an immigrant background who were aged 13 to 17 in 2006, and the employment earnings of young adults who had immigrant parents. In this study, the outcomes of children of immigrant parents from different regions are compared with those of children of Canadian-born parents.

    Release date: 2019-11-15

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201931920470
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-657-X2019018
    Description:

    Using integrated data from the 2006 and 2016 censuses, this study examines the educational and labour market outcomes of a cohort of immigrant children aged 9 to 17 years in 2006. In this study, the results of the children of immigrants from various regions of origin are compared with those of children of Canadian-born parents.

    Release date: 2019-11-15

  • Journals and periodicals: 75-006-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of data sources in order to provide information on various aspects of Canadian society, including labour, income, education, social, and demographic issues, that affect the lives of Canadians.

    Release date: 2019-11-15

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201930521483
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019020
    Description:

    Youth not in employment, education or training (NEET) are considered to be at risk for long-term economic and social difficulties. The number of youth NEET is important to Canada and has also become a global issue, as evidenced by its inclusion as an indicator in the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. To date, most of the Canadian studies on this topic have focused on the sociodemographic characteristics of youth NEET and on their educational and employment experiences during their transition from school to work. Thus, relatively little is known about the psychosocial well-being of youth NEET in the Canadian context. This report aims to address this gap by providing a psychosocial profile of youth NEET compared with youth non-NEET in Canada.

    Release date: 2019-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100015
    Description:

    Previous research has suggested that skills acquired at a young age, such as reading or math skills, may have an impact on the early labour market outcomes of individuals. In this study, tax data linked to the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) and the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) are used to examine the association between background factors at age 15 (including reading proficiency) and employment earnings in young adulthood for a cohort of respondents who were aged 15 in 2000.

    Release date: 2019-10-17

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201929020844
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201901000001
    Description:

    Using data spanning a decade (2007 to 2017) from cycles 1, 2 and 5 of the Canadian Health Measures Survey, this study provides a comprehensive update of current fitness levels and a description of recent trends in the fitness levels of Canadian children and youth aged 6 to 19 years.

    Release date: 2019-10-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100014
    Description:

    This study uses data from the 2006 and 2016 censuses of population, as well as integrated census data from 2006 and 2016, to examine the characteristics associated with English-French bilingualism among Canadian children and youth who were aged 5 to 17 in 2006. The study also examines the factors associated with the acquisition and retention of English-French bilingualism among children and youth in Quebec and in Canada outside Quebec.

    Release date: 2019-10-03
Stats in brief (61)

Stats in brief (61) (0 to 10 of 61 results)

Articles and reports (294)

Articles and reports (294) (0 to 10 of 294 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100016
    Description:

    Based on integrated data from the 2006 and 2016 censuses, this study examines the educational outcomes of a cohort of children with an immigrant background who were aged 13 to 17 in 2006, and the employment earnings of young adults who had immigrant parents. In this study, the outcomes of children of immigrant parents from different regions are compared with those of children of Canadian-born parents.

    Release date: 2019-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-657-X2019018
    Description:

    Using integrated data from the 2006 and 2016 censuses, this study examines the educational and labour market outcomes of a cohort of immigrant children aged 9 to 17 years in 2006. In this study, the results of the children of immigrants from various regions of origin are compared with those of children of Canadian-born parents.

    Release date: 2019-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019020
    Description:

    Youth not in employment, education or training (NEET) are considered to be at risk for long-term economic and social difficulties. The number of youth NEET is important to Canada and has also become a global issue, as evidenced by its inclusion as an indicator in the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. To date, most of the Canadian studies on this topic have focused on the sociodemographic characteristics of youth NEET and on their educational and employment experiences during their transition from school to work. Thus, relatively little is known about the psychosocial well-being of youth NEET in the Canadian context. This report aims to address this gap by providing a psychosocial profile of youth NEET compared with youth non-NEET in Canada.

    Release date: 2019-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100015
    Description:

    Previous research has suggested that skills acquired at a young age, such as reading or math skills, may have an impact on the early labour market outcomes of individuals. In this study, tax data linked to the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) and the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) are used to examine the association between background factors at age 15 (including reading proficiency) and employment earnings in young adulthood for a cohort of respondents who were aged 15 in 2000.

    Release date: 2019-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201901000001
    Description:

    Using data spanning a decade (2007 to 2017) from cycles 1, 2 and 5 of the Canadian Health Measures Survey, this study provides a comprehensive update of current fitness levels and a description of recent trends in the fitness levels of Canadian children and youth aged 6 to 19 years.

    Release date: 2019-10-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100014
    Description:

    This study uses data from the 2006 and 2016 censuses of population, as well as integrated census data from 2006 and 2016, to examine the characteristics associated with English-French bilingualism among Canadian children and youth who were aged 5 to 17 in 2006. The study also examines the factors associated with the acquisition and retention of English-French bilingualism among children and youth in Quebec and in Canada outside Quebec.

    Release date: 2019-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019013
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines participation in early learning and child care for young children in Canada. Child care is an important economic contributor for families since provision of non-parental child care is a necessity for some parents to engage in the labour market. In addition, child care offers opportunities for child development and socialization.

    Release date: 2019-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201900100013
    Description:

    This annual Juristat article presents findings from the 2018 Uniform Crime Reporting Survey. It examines trends in the volume and seriousness of police-reported crime for both violent and non-violent offences at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. Specific violations, such as homicide, sexual assault, fraud, shoplifting and breaking and entering are examined, as well as trends in youth accused of crime.

    Release date: 2019-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201900700001
    Description:

    Statistics Canada developed a new Physical Activity for Youth Questionnaire (PAYQ) to address the limitations of previous self-reporting and objective measurement. PAYQ was subsequently implemented in both the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2014-2015) and the Canadian Community Health Survey (2015-2016). Using those surveys, this study compares accelerometer-measured and self-reported physical activity from the new PAYQ among Canadian youth.

    Release date: 2019-07-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201900700002
    Description:

    For the first time, the 2015 and 2016 Canadian Community Health Survey collected national data on bed sharing. This study uses these data to examine the prevalence and frequency of bed sharing in Canada by selected characteristics of the mother, as well as reported reasons for this practice.

    Release date: 2019-07-17
Journals and periodicals (17)

Journals and periodicals (17) (0 to 10 of 17 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 75-006-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of data sources in order to provide information on various aspects of Canadian society, including labour, income, education, social, and demographic issues, that affect the lives of Canadians.

    Release date: 2019-11-15

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-637-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Aboriginal Peoples Survey is a national survey of Aboriginal peoples (First Nations people living off-reserve, Métis and Inuit) living in urban, rural and northern locations throughout Canada. The survey provides valuable data on the social and economic conditions of Aboriginal children and youth (6-14 years) and Aboriginal people (15 years and over). It was conducted previously in 1991 and in 2001. The survey was designed and implemented in partnership with national Aboriginal organizations. The purpose of the Aboriginal Peoples Survey was to provide data on the social and economic conditions of Aboriginal people in Canada. More specifically, its purpose was to identify the needs of Aboriginal people and focus on issues such as health, language, employment, income, schooling, housing, and mobility. More detailed information about the survey is available in the APS 2006 Concepts and Methods Guide.

    Release date: 2013-03-27

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-402-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Presented in almanac style, the 2012 Canada Year Book contains more than 500 pages of tables, charts and succinct analytical articles on every major area of Statistics Canada's expertise. The Canada Year Book is the premier reference on the social and economic life of Canada and its citizens.

    Release date: 2012-12-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-590-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) is designed to assess, on a regular basis, the achievement of 15-year-olds in reading, mathematical and scientific literacy through a common international test.

    Information gathered through PISA enables a thorough comparative analysis of the skill level of students near the end of their compulsory education. PISA also permits exploration of the ways that skills vary across different social and economic groups and the factors that influence the level and distribution of skills within and between countries.

    PISA is a collaborative effort among member countries of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). In Canada, PISA is administered through a partnership of the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada and Statistics Canada.

    PISA will be repeated every three years. The first PISA cycle was conducted in 2000 and focused on reading, with mathematics and science as minor domains. The focus shifts to mathematics in PISA 2003, to science in 2006, and back to reading in 2009.

    These reports provide results of the PISA assessments of student performance at the provincial level, and compare the achievement of Canadian students to that of students internationally.

    Release date: 2010-12-07

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-644-X
    Description:

    This document of fact sheets provides an early learning profile of Métis, Inuit, and off-reserve First Nations children under the age of six in Canada. The 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey is used to provide broad indicators of young Aboriginal children's experiences with learning. Data include how they learn about words and traditional activities and who helps them learn. Family characteristics associated with participation in early learning activities are also presented.

    Release date: 2010-06-18

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-599-M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This research paper series addresses many topics related to children and youth in Canada, including: cognitive, physical and emotional development; health; behaviour; relationships with others; experiences in the home, at school and at work; family change; and transitions to adulthood. The main data source for the papers in this series is the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

    Release date: 2009-09-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 82-620-M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication presents a series of research articles based on cross-sectional data collected from Cycle 2.2 of the Canadian Community Health Survey, focusing on Nutrition. It also provides links to tables, other research articles and information about the survey.

    Release date: 2007-10-05

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-594-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses three cycles of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to examine whether parental labour market participation and the use of substitute child-care influence the development of the skills needed by pre-school-aged children in order to begin school. The analysis in this paper is based on the arguments that parent-child interaction fosters the development of the skills needed by pre-school-aged children in order to begin school successfully, and that full-time participation in the work force by lone parents (in one-parent families) and by both parents (in dual-parent families) often results in comparatively less time for parent-child interaction than in families with a stay-at-home parent. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine whether reductions in parental time spent with children as a result of work outside the home impact the intellectual development of young children.

    The study indicates that parental participation in the labour market has little effect on the school readiness scores of most pre-school-aged children. However, children's school readiness does appear to be influenced by parental labour market participation if the parents exhibit above-average parenting skills and levels of parental education. Children of mothers who display above-average parenting skills and higher levels of education tend to benefit slightly when their mothers do not work outside the home. Likewise, children of fathers with above-average education exhibit slightly higher cognitive outcomes if their fathers work part time.

    Although the author finds that there is no association between the number of hours that children spend in child care and their level of school readiness, the study does observe that among pre-school children in substitute child-care, those who come from higher-income families tend to score higher on the school readiness tests than do children from lower-income families. This finding may be attributed to the possibility that children in higher-income families are exposed to a higher quality of substitute child-care, or it may be attributed simply to the advantages of growing up in a family with greater resources.

    Release date: 2003-10-23

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-585-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered "Yes" to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 8,000 children (aged 0 to 14) living in households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the children's component of the survey. Persons living in institutions, on Indian reserves, and in the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut were excluded. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, between September 2001 and January 2002. Note that information on children with disabilities was gathered through interviews with their parents or guardians.

    Using the PALS data, this article describes the lives of children aged 5 to 14 who have disabilities and the impact of their disability on the daily activities and employment situation of their families.

    Specific themes covered are:-help with everyday activities received by children with disabilities;-parents access to formal and informal help;-impacts of the child's disability on the family's employment situation;-children's access to specialized aids and services; and-household income.

    Release date: 2003-07-29

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-597-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper provides a descriptive analysis of issues related to the access and use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) among Canadian youth. In particular, this research examines the extent to which inequities in the use and access of ICT exist among Canadian high school students, based on gender, socio-economic status and rural-urban location. Three datasets have been used to study this issue: the Canadian portion of the Second International Technology in Education Study (SITES), an international survey which measures schools' use of technological resources; the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), which was conducted in conjunction with the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA); and Cycle 14 of the General Social Survey (GSS), which focusses specifically on issues related to ICT access and use.The results of these analyses suggest that there is a 'digital divide' among Canadian youth, in terms of access to and experience with ICT. Rural youth are less likely to have access to computers in the home; however, frequency of use and perceived competency levels are not compromised by this trend. Female youth and those from families with low levels of parental education are also less likely to have access to computers in their homes. These groups tend to spend less time on the computer and report lower levels of computer skills competency.

    Release date: 2003-06-23
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