Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (170) (0 to 10 of 170 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X202200100012
    Description:

    Based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) and the Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohort (CanCHEC), this study provides an understanding of suicide-related behaviours, namely suicide ideation and completed suicides, among Canadian immigrants.

    Release date: 2022-12-01

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2021009
    Description:

    This Census in Brief article focuses on the experiences of poverty in Canada based on data from the 2021 Census. It examines disaggregated poverty trends by age, gender, family situation, immigration status as well as by Indigenous identity and for racialized groups. When possible, comparisons are made to data from the 2016 Census.

    Release date: 2022-11-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-599-X2022002
    Description:

    This fact sheet presents the most recent information about on-time and extended-time high school graduation rates in Canada. While this measure will not reflect whether youth ultimately graduate from high school during their lifetime, it does provide policy-makers and researchers with information on how youth progress through their secondary level studies and if they complete them within the expected amount of time.

    Release date: 2022-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-582-X2022002
    Description:

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) draws from a wide variety of data sources to provide information on the school-age population, elementary, secondary and postsecondary education, transitions, and labour market outcomes. PCEIP products include tables, fact sheets, reports and a methodological handbook. They present indicators for all of Canada, the provinces, the territories, as well as selected international comparisons and comparisons over time. The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) is an ongoing initiative of the Canadian Education Statistics Council, a partnership between Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada that provides a set of statistical measures on education systems in Canada.

    Release date: 2022-09-08

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2021005
    Description:

    This Census in Brief article provides a profile of the population who received pandemic-related benefits in 2020, based on data from the 2021 Census of Population. Benefits examined include the newly-established federal emergency and recovery benefits, top-ups to existing federal programs, including the Old Age Security, the Guaranteed Income Supplement and the Canada Child Benefit, as well as pandemic-related benefits from provincial and territorial governments. The share of the population receiving benefits, the median amounts received and the contribution of these benefits to the incomes of recipients are examined by gender, age group, income level and geography.

    Release date: 2022-08-02

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202200700001
    Description:

    There has been increasing scrutiny of opioid prescribing following injury given concerns that prescribed opioids may contribute to addiction and/or overdose. This study aimed to better understand the relationship between injury, opioids prescribed pre- and post-injury, and non-medical drug poisoning. Focusing on working age (15-65 years old) residents of the Fraser Health region, this study used a linked administrative dataset to better understand the relationships between injury, whether the injury was work-related or sustained outside of the workplace, pain management medication in the form of opioid and opioid agonist therapy prescriptions before and after injury, and potential non-medical drug poisoning.

    Release date: 2022-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202200100005
    Description:

    Methodological studies of the effects that human interviewers have on the quality of survey data have long been limited by a critical assumption: that interviewers in a given survey are assigned random subsets of the larger overall sample (also known as interpenetrated assignment). Absent this type of study design, estimates of interviewer effects on survey measures of interest may reflect differences between interviewers in the characteristics of their assigned sample members, rather than recruitment or measurement effects specifically introduced by the interviewers. Previous attempts to approximate interpenetrated assignment have typically used regression models to condition on factors that might be related to interviewer assignment. We introduce a new approach for overcoming this lack of interpenetrated assignment when estimating interviewer effects. This approach, which we refer to as the “anchoring” method, leverages correlations between observed variables that are unlikely to be affected by interviewers (“anchors”) and variables that may be prone to interviewer effects to remove components of within-interviewer correlations that lack of interpenetrated assignment may introduce. We consider both frequentist and Bayesian approaches, where the latter can make use of information about interviewer effect variances in previous waves of a study, if available. We evaluate this new methodology empirically using a simulation study, and then illustrate its application using real survey data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), where interviewer IDs are provided on public-use data files. While our proposed method shares some of the limitations of the traditional approach – namely the need for variables associated with the outcome of interest that are also free of measurement error – it avoids the need for conditional inference and thus has improved inferential qualities when the focus is on marginal estimates, and it shows evidence of further reducing overestimation of larger interviewer effects relative to the traditional approach.

    Release date: 2022-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202200100007
    Description:

    By record linkage one joins records residing in separate files which are believed to be related to the same entity. In this paper we approach record linkage as a classification problem, and adapt the maximum entropy classification method in machine learning to record linkage, both in the supervised and unsupervised settings of machine learning. The set of links will be chosen according to the associated uncertainty. On the one hand, our framework overcomes some persistent theoretical flaws of the classical approach pioneered by Fellegi and Sunter (1969); on the other hand, the proposed algorithm is fully automatic, unlike the classical approach that generally requires clerical review to resolve the undecided cases.

    Release date: 2022-06-21

  • Stats in brief: 89-20-00082021001
    Description:

    This video is part of the confidentiality vetting support series and presents examples of how to use SAS to perform the dominance and homogeneity test while using the Census.

    Release date: 2022-04-29

  • Stats in brief: 89-20-00082021002
    Description:

    This video is part of the confidentiality vetting support series and presents examples of how to use SAS to create proportion output for researchers working with confidential data.

    Release date: 2022-04-27
Stats in brief (29)

Stats in brief (29) (0 to 10 of 29 results)

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2021009
    Description:

    This Census in Brief article focuses on the experiences of poverty in Canada based on data from the 2021 Census. It examines disaggregated poverty trends by age, gender, family situation, immigration status as well as by Indigenous identity and for racialized groups. When possible, comparisons are made to data from the 2016 Census.

    Release date: 2022-11-09

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2021005
    Description:

    This Census in Brief article provides a profile of the population who received pandemic-related benefits in 2020, based on data from the 2021 Census of Population. Benefits examined include the newly-established federal emergency and recovery benefits, top-ups to existing federal programs, including the Old Age Security, the Guaranteed Income Supplement and the Canada Child Benefit, as well as pandemic-related benefits from provincial and territorial governments. The share of the population receiving benefits, the median amounts received and the contribution of these benefits to the incomes of recipients are examined by gender, age group, income level and geography.

    Release date: 2022-08-02

  • Stats in brief: 89-20-00082021001
    Description:

    This video is part of the confidentiality vetting support series and presents examples of how to use SAS to perform the dominance and homogeneity test while using the Census.

    Release date: 2022-04-29

  • Stats in brief: 89-20-00082021002
    Description:

    This video is part of the confidentiality vetting support series and presents examples of how to use SAS to create proportion output for researchers working with confidential data.

    Release date: 2022-04-27

  • Stats in brief: 89-20-00082021003
    Description:

    This video is part of the confidentiality vetting support series and presents examples of how to use Stata to create proportion output for researchers working with confidential data.

    Release date: 2022-04-27

  • Stats in brief: 89-20-00082021004
    Description:

    This video is part of the confidentiality vetting support series and presents examples of how to use Stata to perform the dominance and homogeneity test while using the Census.

    Release date: 2022-04-27

  • Stats in brief: 89-20-00082021005
    Description:

    This video is part of the confidentiality vetting support series and presents examples of how to use R to create proportion output for researchers working with confidential data.

    Release date: 2022-04-27

  • Stats in brief: 89-20-00082021006
    Description:

    This video is part of the confidentiality vetting support series and presents examples of how to use R to perform the dominance and homogeneity test while using the Census.

    Release date: 2022-04-27

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2021016
    Description:

    This infographic features the earnings and mobility of newly-certified journeypersons across Canada. It presents mobility rates over time as well as key results among selected Red Seal trades for earnings and mobility.

    Release date: 2021-03-10

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100081
    Description:

    The purpose of the third iteration of the Canadian Perspectives Survey Series (CPSS) which ran from June 15 to 21, 2020 is to explore the re-opening of economic and social activity. Using data on family and caregivers, this article examines how household chores are shared between men and women in a couple, during confinement. The data covers persons aged 20 and over in Canada who were married or in a common-law relationship at the time of the survey. Respondents living in the same household with a spouse or partner of the opposite sex are considered.

    Release date: 2021-02-15
Articles and reports (136)

Articles and reports (136) (0 to 10 of 136 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X202200100012
    Description:

    Based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) and the Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohort (CanCHEC), this study provides an understanding of suicide-related behaviours, namely suicide ideation and completed suicides, among Canadian immigrants.

    Release date: 2022-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 81-599-X2022002
    Description:

    This fact sheet presents the most recent information about on-time and extended-time high school graduation rates in Canada. While this measure will not reflect whether youth ultimately graduate from high school during their lifetime, it does provide policy-makers and researchers with information on how youth progress through their secondary level studies and if they complete them within the expected amount of time.

    Release date: 2022-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-582-X2022002
    Description:

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) draws from a wide variety of data sources to provide information on the school-age population, elementary, secondary and postsecondary education, transitions, and labour market outcomes. PCEIP products include tables, fact sheets, reports and a methodological handbook. They present indicators for all of Canada, the provinces, the territories, as well as selected international comparisons and comparisons over time. The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) is an ongoing initiative of the Canadian Education Statistics Council, a partnership between Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada that provides a set of statistical measures on education systems in Canada.

    Release date: 2022-09-08

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202200700001
    Description:

    There has been increasing scrutiny of opioid prescribing following injury given concerns that prescribed opioids may contribute to addiction and/or overdose. This study aimed to better understand the relationship between injury, opioids prescribed pre- and post-injury, and non-medical drug poisoning. Focusing on working age (15-65 years old) residents of the Fraser Health region, this study used a linked administrative dataset to better understand the relationships between injury, whether the injury was work-related or sustained outside of the workplace, pain management medication in the form of opioid and opioid agonist therapy prescriptions before and after injury, and potential non-medical drug poisoning.

    Release date: 2022-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202200100005
    Description:

    Methodological studies of the effects that human interviewers have on the quality of survey data have long been limited by a critical assumption: that interviewers in a given survey are assigned random subsets of the larger overall sample (also known as interpenetrated assignment). Absent this type of study design, estimates of interviewer effects on survey measures of interest may reflect differences between interviewers in the characteristics of their assigned sample members, rather than recruitment or measurement effects specifically introduced by the interviewers. Previous attempts to approximate interpenetrated assignment have typically used regression models to condition on factors that might be related to interviewer assignment. We introduce a new approach for overcoming this lack of interpenetrated assignment when estimating interviewer effects. This approach, which we refer to as the “anchoring” method, leverages correlations between observed variables that are unlikely to be affected by interviewers (“anchors”) and variables that may be prone to interviewer effects to remove components of within-interviewer correlations that lack of interpenetrated assignment may introduce. We consider both frequentist and Bayesian approaches, where the latter can make use of information about interviewer effect variances in previous waves of a study, if available. We evaluate this new methodology empirically using a simulation study, and then illustrate its application using real survey data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), where interviewer IDs are provided on public-use data files. While our proposed method shares some of the limitations of the traditional approach – namely the need for variables associated with the outcome of interest that are also free of measurement error – it avoids the need for conditional inference and thus has improved inferential qualities when the focus is on marginal estimates, and it shows evidence of further reducing overestimation of larger interviewer effects relative to the traditional approach.

    Release date: 2022-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202200100007
    Description:

    By record linkage one joins records residing in separate files which are believed to be related to the same entity. In this paper we approach record linkage as a classification problem, and adapt the maximum entropy classification method in machine learning to record linkage, both in the supervised and unsupervised settings of machine learning. The set of links will be chosen according to the associated uncertainty. On the one hand, our framework overcomes some persistent theoretical flaws of the classical approach pioneered by Fellegi and Sunter (1969); on the other hand, the proposed algorithm is fully automatic, unlike the classical approach that generally requires clerical review to resolve the undecided cases.

    Release date: 2022-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 81-582-X2022001
    Description:

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) draws from a wide variety of data sources to provide information on the school-age population, elementary, secondary and postsecondary education, transitions, and labour market outcomes. PCEIP products include tables, fact sheets, reports and a methodological handbook. They present indicators for all of Canada, the provinces, the territories, as well as selected international comparisons and comparisons over time. The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) is an ongoing initiative of the Canadian Education Statistics Council, a partnership between Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada that provides a set of statistical measures on education systems in Canada.

    Release date: 2022-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-582-X2021003
    Description:

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) draws from a wide variety of data sources to provide information on the school-age population, elementary, secondary and postsecondary education, transitions, and labour market outcomes. PCEIP products include tables, fact sheets, reports and a methodological handbook. They present indicators for all of Canada, the provinces, the territories, as well as selected international comparisons and comparisons over time. The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) is an ongoing initiative of the Canadian Education Statistics Council, a partnership between Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada that provides a set of statistical measures on education systems in Canada.

    Release date: 2021-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X202100100027
    Description:

    Privacy concerns are a barrier to applying remote analytics, including machine learning, on sensitive data via the cloud. In this work, we use a leveled fully Homomorphic Encryption scheme to train an end-to-end supervised machine learning algorithm to classify texts while protecting the privacy of the input data points. We train our single-layer neural network on a large simulated dataset, providing a practical solution to a real-world multi-class text classification task. To improve both accuracy and training time, we train an ensemble of such classifiers in parallel using ciphertext packing.

    Key Words: Privacy Preservation, Machine Learning, Encryption

    Release date: 2021-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 42-28-0001202100100003
    Description:

    This chapter provides a broad overview of the education situation of Canadian youth. It focuses on the general level of education for young Canadians, as well as on which groups are driving the rise in educational attainment. The chapter also examines the literacy and numeracy skills of young Canadians and how they compare with their counterparts in other OECD countries. Finally, it looks at some of the costs and benefits of a postsecondary education in Canada, including how such an education has been rewarded in the labour market.

    Release date: 2021-10-04
Journals and periodicals (5)

Journals and periodicals (5) ((5 results))

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-637-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Aboriginal Peoples Survey is a national survey of Aboriginal peoples (First Nations people living off-reserve, Métis and Inuit) living in urban, rural and northern locations throughout Canada. The survey provides valuable data on the social and economic conditions of Aboriginal children and youth (6-14 years) and Aboriginal people (15 years and over). It was conducted previously in 1991 and in 2001. The survey was designed and implemented in partnership with national Aboriginal organizations. The purpose of the Aboriginal Peoples Survey was to provide data on the social and economic conditions of Aboriginal people in Canada. More specifically, its purpose was to identify the needs of Aboriginal people and focus on issues such as health, language, employment, income, schooling, housing, and mobility. More detailed information about the survey is available in the APS 2006 Concepts and Methods Guide.

    Release date: 2013-03-27

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-634-X
    Description:

    The Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) provides an extensive set of data about Aboriginal (Métis, Inuit, and off-reserve First Nations) children under 6 years of age in urban, rural, and northern locations across Canada. The Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) was designed to provide a picture of the early development of Aboriginal children and the social and living conditions in which they are learning and growing.

    The survey was developed by Statistics Canada and Aboriginal advisors from across the country and was conducted jointly with Human Resources and Social Development Canada.

    Release date: 2009-11-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-587-X
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    This paper provides information on Aboriginal employment and unemployment, Aboriginal youths and the impact of education on labour market performance in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia. Annual average data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) on off-reserve Aboriginal peoples from April 2004 to March 2005 are used.

    Release date: 2005-06-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-584-M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study provides a detailed analysis of findings based on the 1998 General Social Survey on Time Use, with some analysis of trends over time using the 1986 and 1992 time use surveys. It addresses the question of how life transitions affect time use patterns and quality of life indicators.

    Like other resources, time is finite. Unlike other resources, time is shared equally by everyone. The trade-offs people make between competing activities depend largely on the nature of their roles and obligations at each stage of life. These trade-offs say a great deal about a person's lifestyle, preferences and choices, or lack of choice. However, the life cycle has lost the uniformity and formality that it once had. Life-course patterns are now more diverse, and the transitions themselves are more likely to be experienced as extended and complex processes rather than as distinct events. Thus, it becomes important to study the impact of various life transitions on time use and quality of life.

    This study examines the following life transitions, with a focus on a comparison of the experiences of women and men:- transition from school to employment- transitions related to union formation and parenthood- transition to retirement- transitions associated with aging: widowhood and changes in living arrangements

    Release date: 2004-09-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-586-X
    Description:

    In today's emerging knowledge societies, the capacity of labour markets, firms and individuals to adjust to change, improve productivity and capitalize on technological innovation depends in large measure on the skills of the adult population. Improving the stock of skills available to the economy through investment in adult education and workplace learning has therefore become an issue of considerable strategic importance. But how are the Canadian markets for adult education and training evolving?

    This report presents, for the first time, evidence on the development of adult education and training in Canada during the last decade. Examined are not only broad trends in the demand and supply of adult education, but also the factors contributing to observed developments. Survey data collected in 1998 allow readers to gauge the current situation and make comparisons over time and across Canadian provinces. The findings indicate, first, that growth in adult education participation has slowed in recent years, and second, that there are major differences between the provinces in who gets trained, and how much.

    Release date: 2001-05-10
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