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All (91)

All (91) (0 to 10 of 91 results)

Stats in brief (61)

Stats in brief (61) (0 to 10 of 61 results)

Articles and reports (25)

Articles and reports (25) (0 to 10 of 25 results)

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201600114627
    Description:

    As an extension of the Provincial and Territorial Economic Accounts, the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts now includes detailed estimates of revenues, expenditures, surplus/deficit and net lending for all government sub-sectors, for each province and territory. This note explains the general approach taken to derive a provincial distribution of those sub-sectors which exist and operate in more than one provincial or territorial jurisdiction.

    Release date: 2016-05-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111862
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Absences from work can be expressed in terms of days lost per year, on the basis of Labour Force Survey data. In this In Brief, the new data on work absences for 2012 are introduced, and the differences between private and public sector employees' absences are examined in more detail.

    Release date: 2013-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2013071
    Description:

    This publication presents estimates of government revenues attributable to tourism for the years 2007 to 2011. Estimates of the revenue attributable to tourism spending by non-residents (i.e. tourism exports) and by residents (i.e. tourism domestic demand) are also included. The main data sources are the Canadian Tourism Satellite Account, National Tourism Indicators, the Income and Expenditure Accounts, the Input-Output tables and T-4 tax remittance files.

    Government revenue covers receipts from taxes on incomes (i.e., on employment earnings, corporate profits, net income of unincorporated business and government business enterprises), contributions to social insurance plans (i.e., premiums for Canada/Quebec Pension Plan, Employment Insurance and workers compensation), taxes on production and products (such as sales and property taxes), and from sales of government goods and services. These revenues are broken down into parts that can be attributed to tourism spending, tourism domestic demand and tourism exports for government as a whole and for the three levels of government (federal, provincial/territorial and municipal) separately. Estimates of the government revenue generated per $100 of tourism spending overall and by residents and non-residents are reported as well. The publication contains several charts and summary tables showing revenues attributable to tourism by level of government and by source of revenue. It also contains a discussion of the concepts, definitions, data sources and methods used in the study.

    Release date: 2013-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2010067
    Description:

    This publication presents estimates of government revenues attributable to tourism for the years 2003 to 2009. Estimates of the revenue attributable to tourism spending by non-residents (i.e. tourism exports) and by residents (i.e. tourism domestic demand) are also included. The main data sources are the Canadian Tourism Satellite Account, National Tourism Indicators, the Income and Expenditure Accounts, the Input-Output tables and T-4 tax remittance files.

    Government revenue covers receipts from taxes on incomes (i.e., on employment earnings, corporate profits, net income of unincorporated business and government business enterprises), contributions to social insurance plans (i.e., premiums for Canada/Quebec Pension Plan, Employment Insurance and workers compensation), taxes on production and products (such as sales and property taxes), and from sales of government goods and services. These revenues are broken down into parts that can be attributed to tourism spending, tourism domestic demand and tourism exports for government as a whole and for the three levels of government (federal, provincial/territorial and municipal) separately. Estimates of the government revenue generated per $100 of tourism spending overall and by residents and non-residents are reported as well. The publication contains several charts and summary tables showing revenues attributable to tourism by level of government and by source of revenue. It also contains a discussion of the concepts, definitions, data sources and methods used in the study.

    Release date: 2010-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900610893
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using national accounts data on the financial flows, balance sheets and Canada's international investments, this paper shows how the crisis in financial markets has affected financial behaviour in Canada.

    Release date: 2009-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2008060
    Description:

    This publication presents estimates of government revenues attributable to tourism for the years 2000 to 2007. Estimates of the revenue attributable to tourism spending by non-residents (i.e. tourism exports) and by residents (i.e. tourism domestic demand) are also included for the first time. The main data sources are the Canadian Tourism Satellite Account, National Tourism Indicators, the Income and Expenditure Accounts, the Input-Output tables and T4 tax remittance files.

    Government revenue covers receipts from taxes on incomes (i.e., on employment earnings, corporate profits, net income of unincorporated business and government business enterprises), contributions to social insurance plans (i.e., premiums for Canada/Quebec Pension Plan, Employment Insurance and workers compensation), taxes on production and products (such as sales and property taxes), and from sales of government goods and services. These revenues are broken down into parts that can be attributed to tourism spending, tourism domestic demand and tourism exports for government as a whole and for the three levels of government (federal, provincial/territorial and municipal) separately. Estimates of the government revenue generated per $100 of tourism spending overall and by residents and non-residents are reported as well. The publication contains several charts and summary tables showing revenues attributable to tourism by level of government and by source of revenue. It also contains a discussion of the concepts, definitions, data sources and methods used in the study.

    Release date: 2008-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2008068
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines retirements since the turn of the millennium among permanent federal employees who occupy jobs subject to the Public Service Employment Act. This study presents statistics on retirements, retirement eligibility, and pensionable years accumulated by age and sex for fiscal year 2006/2007 and other selected fiscal years in the new millennium.

    Release date: 2008-05-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2008019
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The overall growth of government-owned infrastructure has been very similar across most regions over the past 44 years. With the exception of the Atlantic Provinces, the range of average annual capital growth from one region to the next has been very narrow, falling between 1.8% and 2.2% since 1961, according to a new study released in September 2007 in the Canadian Economic Observer.

    Since 2000, governments have increased their infrastructure capital more than at any time since the 1960s and 1970s. However, the growth has not been strong enough to prevent more and more signs of wear in our infrastructure (the data are net of depreciation and in constant 1997 dollars). This is due to cuts in the 1990s when governments were grappling with significant budgetary deficits, as well as many of the assets built in the post-war infrastructure boom reaching the end of their life span.

    This study analyses, from 1961 to 2005, government investment in infrastructure by different levels of government and type of asset by region.

    Release date: 2008-02-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2008066
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This study examines the geographic evolution of employment in the Canada's federal core public administration from 1995 to 2006. Evolution of the number of employees in knowledge-based and less knowledge-based occupations and by gender is examined by province, territory and for the National Capital Region. For purpose of comparison, the trends in the general federal government are discussed.

    Release date: 2008-01-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200700910332
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article finds that the volume of infrastructure capital has rebounded since 2000 after two decades of neglect. While infrastructure growth has been similar across regions, there are sharp differences in the type of asset targeted by the regions, especially when spending slowed after 1980.

    Release date: 2007-09-13
Journals and periodicals (5)

Journals and periodicals (5) ((5 results))

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-204-X
    Description:

    This report provides statistical information of the federal government's activities in science and technology. It covers expenditures and person-years by type of science, performing sectors, provinces and federal departments and agencies. Technical notes, definitions, bibliography and subject index are included.

    Release date: 2014-06-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-402-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Presented in almanac style, the 2012 Canada Year Book contains more than 500 pages of tables, charts and succinct analytical articles on every major area of Statistics Canada's expertise. The Canada Year Book is the premier reference on the social and economic life of Canada and its citizens.

    Release date: 2012-12-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 63-202-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication analyzes the sales of alcoholic beverages in Canada. The report also sets out, in detail, government revenue derived from the control and sale of alcoholic beverages. Analytical text, tables and charts are featured as well as information on imports and exports of spirits, wines and beer. Historical data are included. The publication is an excellent source of information on sales patterns of alcoholic beverages in Canada.

    This publication is temporarily suspended until 2012. However, the data will continue to be produced and released through CANSIM tables 183-0006 and in 183-0015 to 183-0020. Data Tables on sales of alcoholic beverages are also available free of charge from the National economic accounts module of our website.

    Release date: 2008-06-12

  • 4. Canada E-BookArchived
    Journals and periodicals: 11-404-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Canada e-Book is an online version of the Canada Year Book with texts, tables, charts and audio clips that present the country's economic and social trends. The Canada e-Book illustrates Canada and Canadians under four broad headings: The Land, The People, The Economy, and The State. You will find a wealth of information on topics including the human imprint on the environment, population and demography, health, education, household and family life, labour force, arts and leisure, industries, finance, government and justice. All Canadians will enjoy this useful reference that helps explain the social, economic and cultural forces that shape our nation.

    Release date: 2003-05-26

  • Journals and periodicals: 68-513-X
    Description:

    "Generational equity" is a topic that has gradually risen higher and higher on the agenda of governments at all levels. In fact, it is a matter not just for government policy, but a topic that touches many Canadians directly: young and old, parents and grandparents. Canadian policy makers increasingly have to deal with issues associated with the relative status of individuals between successive generations. The reform of public pension programs presents the most obvious example, but there are many other developments that raise the same type of issue. Indeed, the heightened concern over government fiscal policies is due in large part to the readiness of many to view government deficits and debt as a burden on future generations. Generational equity, however, is also a concern of individual Canadians and their families. The allocation of resources between the young and the old within the family is becoming an increasingly important issue for many, especially in light not only of an aging population but also the belief that those just entering the labour force will likely not attain the standard of living to which their parents have become accustomed.

    The contributors to this book examine the operation of government taxes and expenditures from a generational perspective. In part the motivation for bringing these essays together is to offer comprehensive and up-to-date information on the age incidence of government finances. This motivation, however, also has to do with the development of a new accounting framework, Generational Accounting, that has gained some currency in many industrialized countries, particularly in the United States. It is a truism to say that good analysis requires good data, and certainly Statistic Canada's central role is to offer high-quality data in support of analysis and decision making. But the opposite is equally true, if not as obvious: good data requires good analysis. That is to say, new analytical frameworks often highlight the need to organize existing data in different ways, as well as the need for the development of new types of data. This is certainly one of several reasons that Statistics Canada has sought to develop a strong analytical capacity, and to maintain strong ties with the research community. This book is meant to contribute to this process by examining Canadian data through the lens of Generational Accounting, and by analyzing some of the issues that arise.

    Release date: 1998-02-04
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