Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (497) (0 to 10 of 497 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202200900003
    Description:

    In 2018, Canada legalized the use and sale of non-medical cannabis, with most provinces also permitting home cultivation. To advance the knowledge of home cultivation patterns in Canada within the context of legalization, this study examines (1) the demographics and use patterns of cannabis home growers before and after legalization and (2) the relationship between home cultivation and cannabis-related risks, including workplace use and driving after cannabis use.

    Release date: 2022-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X202200100008
    Description:

    This article provides a profile of the number and characteristics of college postgraduate credential students in Canada, as well as their outcomes, including graduation rates, rates of transition to permanent residency (for international students), and earnings after graduation.

    Release date: 2022-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202200800003
    Description:

    Globally, the suicide rate is two times higher for males than for females. This observational study analyzed a routinely collected dataset based on all medical examiner-determined suicide deaths among people aged 10 years and older in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, between 1997 and 2016. The objectives of this study were to describe the overall and age-specific rates of suicide by sex and to compare the demographic and clinical characteristics of males and females who died by suicide.

    Release date: 2022-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202200100005
    Description:

    Methodological studies of the effects that human interviewers have on the quality of survey data have long been limited by a critical assumption: that interviewers in a given survey are assigned random subsets of the larger overall sample (also known as interpenetrated assignment). Absent this type of study design, estimates of interviewer effects on survey measures of interest may reflect differences between interviewers in the characteristics of their assigned sample members, rather than recruitment or measurement effects specifically introduced by the interviewers. Previous attempts to approximate interpenetrated assignment have typically used regression models to condition on factors that might be related to interviewer assignment. We introduce a new approach for overcoming this lack of interpenetrated assignment when estimating interviewer effects. This approach, which we refer to as the “anchoring” method, leverages correlations between observed variables that are unlikely to be affected by interviewers (“anchors”) and variables that may be prone to interviewer effects to remove components of within-interviewer correlations that lack of interpenetrated assignment may introduce. We consider both frequentist and Bayesian approaches, where the latter can make use of information about interviewer effect variances in previous waves of a study, if available. We evaluate this new methodology empirically using a simulation study, and then illustrate its application using real survey data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), where interviewer IDs are provided on public-use data files. While our proposed method shares some of the limitations of the traditional approach – namely the need for variables associated with the outcome of interest that are also free of measurement error – it avoids the need for conditional inference and thus has improved inferential qualities when the focus is on marginal estimates, and it shows evidence of further reducing overestimation of larger interviewer effects relative to the traditional approach.

    Release date: 2022-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200500002
    Description:

    The COVID-19 Pandemic has been affecting Canadians’ daily lives since the second quarter of 2020. Production and employment were cut back largely at the beginning in order to slow the spread of this contagious disease, leading to a sharp decline in income and a rise in the unemployment rate. GDP per capita of a country is often used for assessing the standard of living and its cross-country comparisons. Since 2020, Canada’s per capita GDP has averaged -1.3% per year, down from its long-term annual average of 1.2% from 1981 to 2019 and from 1.0% per year from 2010 to 2019. For a better understanding of the sources of Canada’s per capita GDP growth, this article decomposes GDP per capita into labour productivity, work intensity, employment rate, participation rate, and the share of working population. The contributions of these 5 ratios to Canada’s per capita GDP growth are examined.

    Release date: 2022-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202200500003
    Description:

    Canadian and international research has shown that the COVID-19 pandemic has led to changes in health behaviours, including physical activity. The purpose of this study is to compare physical activity before and during the COVID-19 pandemic by comparing the September through December 2020 data from the 2020 The Canadian Community Health Survey to October through December data from the 2018 CCHS. This study examines this comparison through a health equity lens to illustrate the differential impact across the Canadian population in the domain of physical activity.

    Release date: 2022-05-18

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200400004
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic and responses to it have contributed to, and probably accelerated, the roles that the internet and digital technologies play in our lives, thrusting large numbers of people and organizations online. But internet and digital skills vary and not everyone had the same capacity to rapidly shift activities of daily life online. The objective of this paper is to document the changes in the online activities and skills reported by Canadians prior to, and during, the COVID-19 pandemic. Data from 2018 and 2020 Canadian Internet Use Surveys are used to categorize Canadians into one of five internet user groups, ranging from non-users to advanced users.

    Release date: 2022-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X202200100005
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines the nature and extent of police-reported hate crime in Canada. Key topics include motivations for hate crime (e.g., race/ethnicity, religion, and sexual orientation), types of offences, geographical comparisons, and victim/accused characteristics. The article uses data from the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey which gathers data from police records.

    Release date: 2022-03-17

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2022022
    Description:

    Using police-reported data from the 2020 Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Survey, this infographic is a visual representation of some of these data. Findings include results at the national, provincial, and territorial levels. Also included are findings related to the type and motivation of hate crimes committed in Canada, as well as the most serious violations reported in each incident.

    Release date: 2022-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202200300001
    Description:

    This study provides an update on the sleep behaviours (duration, quality, work and free day variability, and timing) of Canadian adults and how they align with recommendations from the 24-Hour Movement Guidelines. It also examines the proportion of adults meeting sleep duration recommendations based on sociodemographic characteristics, sleep behaviours, physical activity and screen time.

    Release date: 2022-03-16
Stats in brief (26)

Stats in brief (26) (0 to 10 of 26 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2022022
    Description:

    Using police-reported data from the 2020 Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Survey, this infographic is a visual representation of some of these data. Findings include results at the national, provincial, and territorial levels. Also included are findings related to the type and motivation of hate crimes committed in Canada, as well as the most serious violations reported in each incident.

    Release date: 2022-03-17

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202100100040
    Description:

    This article analyzes the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy Regional and Community-level Database from a rural business perspective. This database covers the period from October 25, 2020 to January 16, 2021. It is based on Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS) microdata and administrative data sources available within Statistics Canada. Topics include number of CEWS supported employees and subsidy amounts in rural areas, comparison of rural and urban businesses, and analysis by industry and province/territory.

    Release date: 2021-12-06

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2021090
    Description:

    This infographic uses data from the Canadian Social Survey to look at loneliness. It shows that loneliness is prevalent across Canada and that the share of people in Canada who reported high levels of loneliness varies based on age group, gender and marital status. It also shows that those who are lonely report worse mental health and lower life satisfaction. Loneliness is an indicator in Canada's Quality of Life Framework.

    Release date: 2021-11-24

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2021081
    Description:

    The data on natural wealth presented reflects the proven & probable reserves for select minerals and established active reserves for energy (2020 preliminary).

    Release date: 2021-11-01

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202100100032
    Description:

    While lockdown periods and physical distancing measures are fundamental in reducing virus transmission, prolonged restrictions may lead to reduced engagement in physical activity and exercise. This article examines changes in reported physical activity from before to during the COVID-19 pandemic. More specifically, it examines changes in the proportion of Canadians meeting physical activity guidelines, as well as changes in the types of physical activity reported. The article explores differences between youth (aged 12 to 17), adults (aged 18 to 64) and older adults (aged 65 and over).

    Release date: 2021-09-17

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202100100028
    Description:

    This article examines some of the effects of COVID-19 on rural businesses in Canada, with comparison to urban counterparts by industry for contextual support. Topics include business obstacles, expectations for the next year, workforce changes and other subjects from the Canadian Survey on Business Conditions, second quarter of 2021.

    Release date: 2021-07-09

  • Stats in brief: 11-629-X2021001
    Description:

    The Survey on Accessibility in Federal Sector Organizations will provide key information on selected priority areas covered under the Accessible Canada Act. These priority areas include information and communications technology such as online access to services and transportation. The Government of Canada adopted the Accessible Canada Act in 2019, the purpose of which is to help create a barrier-free Canada for people with disabilities when they interact with areas under federal jurisdiction.

    Release date: 2021-03-08

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2021002
    Description:

    This is an infographic about snowmobiling deaths. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Coroner and Medical Examiner Database and the Canadian Vital Statistics: Death Database.

    Release date: 2021-01-22

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100087
    Description:

    Using the latest data from the Vital Statistics - Death Database, this article presents information about the most common comorbid conditions in COVID-19 deaths, as well as the extent to which these conditions differ by age groups. Comorbidities are defined as chronic and acute conditions, diseases, disorders, and complications appearing on the medical certificate of cause of death where COVID-19 was involved in the death.

    Release date: 2020-11-16

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2020076
    Description:

    This infographic highlights key findings from the new motor vehicle registration survey in British Columbia for the first and second quarter of 2020.

    Release date: 2020-11-09
Articles and reports (463)

Articles and reports (463) (0 to 10 of 463 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202200900003
    Description:

    In 2018, Canada legalized the use and sale of non-medical cannabis, with most provinces also permitting home cultivation. To advance the knowledge of home cultivation patterns in Canada within the context of legalization, this study examines (1) the demographics and use patterns of cannabis home growers before and after legalization and (2) the relationship between home cultivation and cannabis-related risks, including workplace use and driving after cannabis use.

    Release date: 2022-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X202200100008
    Description:

    This article provides a profile of the number and characteristics of college postgraduate credential students in Canada, as well as their outcomes, including graduation rates, rates of transition to permanent residency (for international students), and earnings after graduation.

    Release date: 2022-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202200800003
    Description:

    Globally, the suicide rate is two times higher for males than for females. This observational study analyzed a routinely collected dataset based on all medical examiner-determined suicide deaths among people aged 10 years and older in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, between 1997 and 2016. The objectives of this study were to describe the overall and age-specific rates of suicide by sex and to compare the demographic and clinical characteristics of males and females who died by suicide.

    Release date: 2022-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202200100005
    Description:

    Methodological studies of the effects that human interviewers have on the quality of survey data have long been limited by a critical assumption: that interviewers in a given survey are assigned random subsets of the larger overall sample (also known as interpenetrated assignment). Absent this type of study design, estimates of interviewer effects on survey measures of interest may reflect differences between interviewers in the characteristics of their assigned sample members, rather than recruitment or measurement effects specifically introduced by the interviewers. Previous attempts to approximate interpenetrated assignment have typically used regression models to condition on factors that might be related to interviewer assignment. We introduce a new approach for overcoming this lack of interpenetrated assignment when estimating interviewer effects. This approach, which we refer to as the “anchoring” method, leverages correlations between observed variables that are unlikely to be affected by interviewers (“anchors”) and variables that may be prone to interviewer effects to remove components of within-interviewer correlations that lack of interpenetrated assignment may introduce. We consider both frequentist and Bayesian approaches, where the latter can make use of information about interviewer effect variances in previous waves of a study, if available. We evaluate this new methodology empirically using a simulation study, and then illustrate its application using real survey data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), where interviewer IDs are provided on public-use data files. While our proposed method shares some of the limitations of the traditional approach – namely the need for variables associated with the outcome of interest that are also free of measurement error – it avoids the need for conditional inference and thus has improved inferential qualities when the focus is on marginal estimates, and it shows evidence of further reducing overestimation of larger interviewer effects relative to the traditional approach.

    Release date: 2022-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200500002
    Description:

    The COVID-19 Pandemic has been affecting Canadians’ daily lives since the second quarter of 2020. Production and employment were cut back largely at the beginning in order to slow the spread of this contagious disease, leading to a sharp decline in income and a rise in the unemployment rate. GDP per capita of a country is often used for assessing the standard of living and its cross-country comparisons. Since 2020, Canada’s per capita GDP has averaged -1.3% per year, down from its long-term annual average of 1.2% from 1981 to 2019 and from 1.0% per year from 2010 to 2019. For a better understanding of the sources of Canada’s per capita GDP growth, this article decomposes GDP per capita into labour productivity, work intensity, employment rate, participation rate, and the share of working population. The contributions of these 5 ratios to Canada’s per capita GDP growth are examined.

    Release date: 2022-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202200500003
    Description:

    Canadian and international research has shown that the COVID-19 pandemic has led to changes in health behaviours, including physical activity. The purpose of this study is to compare physical activity before and during the COVID-19 pandemic by comparing the September through December 2020 data from the 2020 The Canadian Community Health Survey to October through December data from the 2018 CCHS. This study examines this comparison through a health equity lens to illustrate the differential impact across the Canadian population in the domain of physical activity.

    Release date: 2022-05-18

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200400004
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic and responses to it have contributed to, and probably accelerated, the roles that the internet and digital technologies play in our lives, thrusting large numbers of people and organizations online. But internet and digital skills vary and not everyone had the same capacity to rapidly shift activities of daily life online. The objective of this paper is to document the changes in the online activities and skills reported by Canadians prior to, and during, the COVID-19 pandemic. Data from 2018 and 2020 Canadian Internet Use Surveys are used to categorize Canadians into one of five internet user groups, ranging from non-users to advanced users.

    Release date: 2022-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X202200100005
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines the nature and extent of police-reported hate crime in Canada. Key topics include motivations for hate crime (e.g., race/ethnicity, religion, and sexual orientation), types of offences, geographical comparisons, and victim/accused characteristics. The article uses data from the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey which gathers data from police records.

    Release date: 2022-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202200300001
    Description:

    This study provides an update on the sleep behaviours (duration, quality, work and free day variability, and timing) of Canadian adults and how they align with recommendations from the 24-Hour Movement Guidelines. It also examines the proportion of adults meeting sleep duration recommendations based on sociodemographic characteristics, sleep behaviours, physical activity and screen time.

    Release date: 2022-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202200200001
    Description:

    The retail food environment is a modifiable component of the built environment which has the potential to contribute to improvements in the diets of Canadians at the population level. It is defined by geographic access to different types of retail food sources, including restaurants and food stores. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and validation of the Canadian Food Environment Dataset (Can-FED): a pan-Canadian dataset of retail food environment measures at the dissemination area (DA) level using food outlet data from the 2018 Statistics Canada Business Register.

    Release date: 2022-02-16
Journals and periodicals (8)

Journals and periodicals (8) ((8 results))

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-004-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report introduces the Crime Severity Index, a new tool for measuring police-reported crime in Canada that for the first time tracks changes in the severity of crime, not just volume.The report also examines how crime is measured in Canada, as well as recent improvements to statistics on crime that are gathered from the police.

    Release date: 2009-04-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 83-003-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN) is the first nationally representative survey to focus on the working conditions and health of Canada's nurses. Registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) in all provinces and territories shared their perceptions on a variety of topics, including:- workload- working overtime, whether paid or unpaid- adverse events such as medication errors and patient falls- support and respect from co-workers and supervisors- staffing adequacy- working relations with physicians- their own chronic diseases and injuries- their mental health.

    The 2005 NSWHN was developed in collaboration with organizations representing practicing nurses, health care researchers, health information specialists and federal government departments. The survey was conducted by Statistics Canada in partnership with the Canadian Institute for Health Information and Health Canada. A total of 18,676 nurses were interviewed, representing LPNs, RNs and RPNs in a variety of health care settings and in all provinces and territories. The survey's impressive response rate of 80% reflects the enthusiasm and support of nurses across the country.

    The survey collected information on a rich array of topics reflecting the physical and emotional challenges nurses face in delivering patient care today. Nurses answered many questions about the quality of patient care, working relations with co-workers and managers, the amount of time they work to get their jobs done, and the way they feel about their jobs and careers as nurses. Data from the 2005 NSWHN will provide an invaluable resource for researchers, health care providers, policy makers and anyone with an interest in human resources, particularly in the health care field.

    Release date: 2006-12-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-603-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    "Learning a living: First results of the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey" presents new evidence on the nature and magnitude of the literacy gaps faced by OECD countries and how these gaps have evolved over the medium term.

    The fundamental goal of the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL) is to shed new light on the twin processes of skill gain and loss. The survey is sponsored by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

    The report offers new insights into the factors that influence the formation and loss of adult skills in various settings - at home and at work - for the seven countries participating in the first round of data collection. The study offers the first comparative evidence on the impact of formal adult education and informal learning on the supply of skill. It also provides unique insight into the distribution of information and communication technology skills, and how these have amplified both productivity and wage inequality.

    It is meant to assist decision makers in formulating policy in four areas:-Policies aimed at removing skill deficits that act as barriers to innovation, productivity and high rates of economic growth;-Policies designed to limit and reverse social exclusion and income inequality; -Policies that seek to reduce the unit cost of delivering public health care and education services;-Policies conceived to improve quality in all spheres, from public services to quality of life, individual fulfillment and happiness.

    Release date: 2005-05-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-563-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report looks at the influence of organized theft rings on the trends and numbers of stolen vehicles in Canada.

    Release date: 2004-05-27

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-518-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The food-processing industry benefits from a wide a range of new advanced technologies. Technological advances include computer-based information and control systems, as well as sophisticated processing and packaging methods that enhance product quality, improve food safety and reduce costs. Continuous quality improvement and benchmarking are examples of related business practices.

    This study examines the use of advanced technologies in the food-processing industry. It focuses not just on the incidence and intensity of use of these new technologies but also on the way technology relates to overall firm strategy. It also examines how technology use is affected by selected industry structural characteristics and how the adoption of technologies affects the performance of firms. It considers as well how the environment influences technological change. The nature and structure of the industry are shown to condition the competitive environment, the business strategies that are pursued, product characteristics and the role of technology.

    Firms make strategic choices in light of technological opportunities and the risks and opportunities provided by their competitive environments. They implement strategies through appropriate business practices and activities, including the development of core competencies in the areas of marketing, production and human resources, as well as technology. Firms that differ in size and nationality choose to pursue different technological strategies. This study focuses on how these differences are reflected in the different use of technology for large and small establishments, for foreign and domestic plants and for plants in different industries.

    Release date: 1999-12-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 82F0076X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Heart disease and stroke are major causes of illness, disability and death in Canada and they exact high personal, community and health care costs. The goal of The changing face of heart disease and stroke in Canada, the fifth in a series of reports from the Canadian Heart and Stroke Surveillance System (CHSSS), is to provide health professionals and policy makers with an overview of current trends in risk factors, interventions and services, and health outcomes of heart disease and stroke in Canada.

    Release date: 1999-10-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 89F0116X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    These highlights provide a brief summary of the report "Inequalities in literacy skills among youth in Canada and the United States", the latest monograph released using data from the International Adult Literacy Survey. This report suggests that youth in North America do not fare as well in their literacy skills as their European counterparts. Variables such as income and education continue to have direct and indirect effects on people's literacy skills.

    Release date: 1999-10-15

  • Journals and periodicals: 84F0013X
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    This study was initiated to test the validity of probabilistic linkage methods used at Statistics Canada. It compared the results of data linkages on infant deaths in Canada with infant death data from Nova Scotia and Alberta. It also compared the availability of fetal deaths on the national and provincial files.

    Release date: 1999-10-08
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