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COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (241) (0 to 10 of 241 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-645-X2015001
    Description:

    Aboriginal Statistics at a Glance is a thematic guide to Aboriginal data at Statistics Canada. Each theme is illustrated with a chart presenting statistical information on a basic indicator, a plain language definition and links to related information to further assist people in meeting their data needs.

    Release date: 2015-12-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-645-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Aboriginal Statistics at a Glance provides data users with a thematic guide to Aboriginal data at Statistics Canada. It includes data for the First Nations (North American Indian), Métis, and Inuit populations. Each theme is illustrated with a chart presenting key indicators, a plain language definition of the indicator and links to related data tables and published articles to further assist users in meeting their data needs. Data sources include the 1996, 2001 and 2006 censuses of population, the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey, and the 2007/2008 Adult Correctional Services Survey.

    Release date: 2015-12-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2015371
    Description:

    This paper investigates whether registered pension plans (RPPs) help households prepare financially for retirement or simply substitute for other forms of private saving. This issue is addressed using a panel of 1.8 million Canadian households, from 1991 to 2010, which appear in the Longitudinal Administrative Databank. The analysis controls for correlations in savings across accounts due to unobserved tastes for saving by exploiting the fact that employer contribution rates increase discontinuously on earnings above the average industrial wage, a unique feature of occupational pensions in Canada, the effect being estimated in a Regression Kink Design.

    Release date: 2015-12-21

  • Stats in brief: 16-508-X2015009
    Description:

    This fact sheet looks at the environmental quality of surface water sources prior to treatment using data from the 2013 Survey of Drinking Water Plants.

    Release date: 2015-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201500214229
    Description:

    Self-weighting estimation through equal probability selection methods (epsem) is desirable for variance efficiency. Traditionally, the epsem property for (one phase) two stage designs for estimating population-level parameters is realized by using each primary sampling unit (PSU) population count as the measure of size for PSU selection along with equal sample size allocation per PSU under simple random sampling (SRS) of elementary units. However, when self-weighting estimates are desired for parameters corresponding to multiple domains under a pre-specified sample allocation to domains, Folsom, Potter and Williams (1987) showed that a composite measure of size can be used to select PSUs to obtain epsem designs when besides domain-level PSU counts (i.e., distribution of domain population over PSUs), frame-level domain identifiers for elementary units are also assumed to be available. The term depsem-A will be used to denote such (one phase) two stage designs to obtain domain-level epsem estimation. Folsom et al. also considered two phase two stage designs when domain-level PSU counts are unknown, but whole PSU counts are known. For these designs (to be termed depsem-B) with PSUs selected proportional to the usual size measure (i.e., the total PSU count) at the first stage, all elementary units within each selected PSU are first screened for classification into domains in the first phase of data collection before SRS selection at the second stage. Domain-stratified samples are then selected within PSUs with suitably chosen domain sampling rates such that the desired domain sample sizes are achieved and the resulting design is self-weighting. In this paper, we first present a simple justification of composite measures of size for the depsem-A design and of the domain sampling rates for the depsem-B design. Then, for depsem-A and -B designs, we propose generalizations, first to cases where frame-level domain identifiers for elementary units are not available and domain-level PSU counts are only approximately known from alternative sources, and second to cases where PSU size measures are pre-specified based on other practical and desirable considerations of over- and under-sampling of certain domains. We also present a further generalization in the presence of subsampling of elementary units and nonresponse within selected PSUs at the first phase before selecting phase two elementary units from domains within each selected PSU. This final generalization of depsem-B is illustrated for an area sample of housing units.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201500214230
    Description:

    This paper develops allocation methods for stratified sample surveys where composite small area estimators are a priority, and areas are used as strata. Longford (2006) proposed an objective criterion for this situation, based on a weighted combination of the mean squared errors of small area means and a grand mean. Here, we redefine this approach within a model-assisted framework, allowing regressor variables and a more natural interpretation of results using an intra-class correlation parameter. We also consider several uses of power allocation, and allow the placing of other constraints such as maximum relative root mean squared errors for stratum estimators. We find that a simple power allocation can perform very nearly as well as the optimal design even when the objective is to minimize Longford’s (2006) criterion.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201500214231
    Description:

    Rotating panels are widely applied by national statistical institutes, for example, to produce official statistics about the labour force. Estimation procedures are generally based on traditional design-based procedures known from classical sampling theory. A major drawback of this class of estimators is that small sample sizes result in large standard errors and that they are not robust for measurement bias. Two examples showing the effects of measurement bias are rotation group bias in rotating panels, and systematic differences in the outcome of a survey due to a major redesign of the underlying process. In this paper we apply a multivariate structural time series model to the Dutch Labour Force Survey to produce model-based figures about the monthly labour force. The model reduces the standard errors of the estimates by taking advantage of sample information collected in previous periods, accounts for rotation group bias and autocorrelation induced by the rotating panel, and models discontinuities due to a survey redesign. Additionally, we discuss the use of correlated auxiliary series in the model to further improve the accuracy of the model estimates. The method is applied by Statistics Netherlands to produce accurate official monthly statistics about the labour force that are consistent over time, despite a redesign of the survey process.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201500214236
    Description:

    We propose a model-assisted extension of weighting design-effect measures. We develop a summary-level statistic for different variables of interest, in single-stage sampling and under calibration weight adjustments. Our proposed design effect measure captures the joint effects of a non-epsem sampling design, unequal weights produced using calibration adjustments, and the strength of the association between an analysis variable and the auxiliaries used in calibration. We compare our proposed measure to existing design effect measures in simulations using variables like those collected in establishment surveys and telephone surveys of households.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201500214237
    Description:

    Careful design of a dual-frame random digit dial (RDD) telephone survey requires selecting from among many options that have varying impacts on cost, precision, and coverage in order to obtain the best possible implementation of the study goals. One such consideration is whether to screen cell-phone households in order to interview cell-phone only (CPO) households and exclude dual-user household, or to take all interviews obtained via the cell-phone sample. We present a framework in which to consider the tradeoffs between these two options and a method to select the optimal design. We derive and discuss the optimum allocation of sample size between the two sampling frames and explore the choice of optimum p, the mixing parameter for the dual-user domain. We illustrate our methods using the National Immunization Survey, sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201500214238
    Description:

    Félix-Medina and Thompson (2004) proposed a variant of link-tracing sampling to sample hidden and/or hard-to-detect human populations such as drug users and sex workers. In their variant, an initial sample of venues is selected and the people found in the sampled venues are asked to name other members of the population to be included in the sample. Those authors derived maximum likelihood estimators of the population size under the assumption that the probability that a person is named by another in a sampled venue (link-probability) does not depend on the named person (homogeneity assumption). In this work we extend their research to the case of heterogeneous link-probabilities and derive unconditional and conditional maximum likelihood estimators of the population size. We also propose profile likelihood and bootstrap confidence intervals for the size of the population. The results of simulations studies carried out by us show that in presence of heterogeneous link-probabilities the proposed estimators perform reasonably well provided that relatively large sampling fractions, say larger than 0.5, be used, whereas the estimators derived under the homogeneity assumption perform badly. The outcomes also show that the proposed confidence intervals are not very robust to deviations from the assumed models.

    Release date: 2015-12-17
Stats in brief (77)

Stats in brief (77) (0 to 10 of 77 results)

  • Stats in brief: 16-508-X2015009
    Description:

    This fact sheet looks at the environmental quality of surface water sources prior to treatment using data from the 2013 Survey of Drinking Water Plants.

    Release date: 2015-12-18

  • Stats in brief: 11-630-X2015009
    Description:

    In this edition of Canadian Megatrends, we look at increased participation of women in the paid workforce since the 1950s.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Stats in brief: 51-004-X2015022
    Description:

    This report presents monthly aircraft movements for Canadian airports with NAV CANADA air traffic control towers and NAV CANADA flight service stations.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2015006
    Description:

    This infographic describes results on giving from the 2013 General Social Survey (GSS) on Giving, Volunteering and Participating. The purpose of this survey is to collect data regarding unpaid volunteer activities, charitable giving and participation. The results will help build a better understanding of these activities which can in turn be used to help develop programs and services.

    Release date: 2015-12-16

  • Stats in brief: 82-625-X201500114296
    Description:

    Statistics shown in this fact sheet come from vital statistics Canadian death database. These data are collected from all provincial and territorial vital statistics registries and contain demographic and medical (cause of death) information on all deaths in Canada.

    Release date: 2015-12-10

  • Stats in brief: 82-625-X201500114297
    Description:

    This fact sheet presents the age-standardized mortality rates and analyzes the trends in mortality rates since 2000, with emphasis on the leading causes of death.

    Release date: 2015-12-10

  • Stats in brief: 51-004-X2015021
    Description:

    This report presents monthly aircraft movements for Canadian airports without NAV CANADA air traffic control towers or NAV CANADA flight service stations.

    Release date: 2015-12-03

  • Stats in brief: 89-654-X2015003
    Description:

    The Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD) is a national survey of Canadians aged 15 and over whose everyday activities are limited because of a long-term condition or health-related problem. The exception to this is that people with developmental disabilities must have been diagnosed by a health practitioner. Their disability did not need to limit their daily activities.

    Release date: 2015-12-03

  • Stats in brief: 11-629-X2015034
    Description:

    This video details Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

    Release date: 2015-12-01

  • Stats in brief: 51-004-X2015020
    Description:

    This report presents monthly aircraft movements for Canadian airports with NAV CANADA air traffic control towers and NAV CANADA flight service stations.

    Release date: 2015-11-30
Articles and reports (156)

Articles and reports (156) (0 to 10 of 156 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-645-X2015001
    Description:

    Aboriginal Statistics at a Glance is a thematic guide to Aboriginal data at Statistics Canada. Each theme is illustrated with a chart presenting statistical information on a basic indicator, a plain language definition and links to related information to further assist people in meeting their data needs.

    Release date: 2015-12-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2015371
    Description:

    This paper investigates whether registered pension plans (RPPs) help households prepare financially for retirement or simply substitute for other forms of private saving. This issue is addressed using a panel of 1.8 million Canadian households, from 1991 to 2010, which appear in the Longitudinal Administrative Databank. The analysis controls for correlations in savings across accounts due to unobserved tastes for saving by exploiting the fact that employer contribution rates increase discontinuously on earnings above the average industrial wage, a unique feature of occupational pensions in Canada, the effect being estimated in a Regression Kink Design.

    Release date: 2015-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201500214229
    Description:

    Self-weighting estimation through equal probability selection methods (epsem) is desirable for variance efficiency. Traditionally, the epsem property for (one phase) two stage designs for estimating population-level parameters is realized by using each primary sampling unit (PSU) population count as the measure of size for PSU selection along with equal sample size allocation per PSU under simple random sampling (SRS) of elementary units. However, when self-weighting estimates are desired for parameters corresponding to multiple domains under a pre-specified sample allocation to domains, Folsom, Potter and Williams (1987) showed that a composite measure of size can be used to select PSUs to obtain epsem designs when besides domain-level PSU counts (i.e., distribution of domain population over PSUs), frame-level domain identifiers for elementary units are also assumed to be available. The term depsem-A will be used to denote such (one phase) two stage designs to obtain domain-level epsem estimation. Folsom et al. also considered two phase two stage designs when domain-level PSU counts are unknown, but whole PSU counts are known. For these designs (to be termed depsem-B) with PSUs selected proportional to the usual size measure (i.e., the total PSU count) at the first stage, all elementary units within each selected PSU are first screened for classification into domains in the first phase of data collection before SRS selection at the second stage. Domain-stratified samples are then selected within PSUs with suitably chosen domain sampling rates such that the desired domain sample sizes are achieved and the resulting design is self-weighting. In this paper, we first present a simple justification of composite measures of size for the depsem-A design and of the domain sampling rates for the depsem-B design. Then, for depsem-A and -B designs, we propose generalizations, first to cases where frame-level domain identifiers for elementary units are not available and domain-level PSU counts are only approximately known from alternative sources, and second to cases where PSU size measures are pre-specified based on other practical and desirable considerations of over- and under-sampling of certain domains. We also present a further generalization in the presence of subsampling of elementary units and nonresponse within selected PSUs at the first phase before selecting phase two elementary units from domains within each selected PSU. This final generalization of depsem-B is illustrated for an area sample of housing units.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201500214230
    Description:

    This paper develops allocation methods for stratified sample surveys where composite small area estimators are a priority, and areas are used as strata. Longford (2006) proposed an objective criterion for this situation, based on a weighted combination of the mean squared errors of small area means and a grand mean. Here, we redefine this approach within a model-assisted framework, allowing regressor variables and a more natural interpretation of results using an intra-class correlation parameter. We also consider several uses of power allocation, and allow the placing of other constraints such as maximum relative root mean squared errors for stratum estimators. We find that a simple power allocation can perform very nearly as well as the optimal design even when the objective is to minimize Longford’s (2006) criterion.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201500214231
    Description:

    Rotating panels are widely applied by national statistical institutes, for example, to produce official statistics about the labour force. Estimation procedures are generally based on traditional design-based procedures known from classical sampling theory. A major drawback of this class of estimators is that small sample sizes result in large standard errors and that they are not robust for measurement bias. Two examples showing the effects of measurement bias are rotation group bias in rotating panels, and systematic differences in the outcome of a survey due to a major redesign of the underlying process. In this paper we apply a multivariate structural time series model to the Dutch Labour Force Survey to produce model-based figures about the monthly labour force. The model reduces the standard errors of the estimates by taking advantage of sample information collected in previous periods, accounts for rotation group bias and autocorrelation induced by the rotating panel, and models discontinuities due to a survey redesign. Additionally, we discuss the use of correlated auxiliary series in the model to further improve the accuracy of the model estimates. The method is applied by Statistics Netherlands to produce accurate official monthly statistics about the labour force that are consistent over time, despite a redesign of the survey process.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201500214236
    Description:

    We propose a model-assisted extension of weighting design-effect measures. We develop a summary-level statistic for different variables of interest, in single-stage sampling and under calibration weight adjustments. Our proposed design effect measure captures the joint effects of a non-epsem sampling design, unequal weights produced using calibration adjustments, and the strength of the association between an analysis variable and the auxiliaries used in calibration. We compare our proposed measure to existing design effect measures in simulations using variables like those collected in establishment surveys and telephone surveys of households.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201500214237
    Description:

    Careful design of a dual-frame random digit dial (RDD) telephone survey requires selecting from among many options that have varying impacts on cost, precision, and coverage in order to obtain the best possible implementation of the study goals. One such consideration is whether to screen cell-phone households in order to interview cell-phone only (CPO) households and exclude dual-user household, or to take all interviews obtained via the cell-phone sample. We present a framework in which to consider the tradeoffs between these two options and a method to select the optimal design. We derive and discuss the optimum allocation of sample size between the two sampling frames and explore the choice of optimum p, the mixing parameter for the dual-user domain. We illustrate our methods using the National Immunization Survey, sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201500214238
    Description:

    Félix-Medina and Thompson (2004) proposed a variant of link-tracing sampling to sample hidden and/or hard-to-detect human populations such as drug users and sex workers. In their variant, an initial sample of venues is selected and the people found in the sampled venues are asked to name other members of the population to be included in the sample. Those authors derived maximum likelihood estimators of the population size under the assumption that the probability that a person is named by another in a sampled venue (link-probability) does not depend on the named person (homogeneity assumption). In this work we extend their research to the case of heterogeneous link-probabilities and derive unconditional and conditional maximum likelihood estimators of the population size. We also propose profile likelihood and bootstrap confidence intervals for the size of the population. The results of simulations studies carried out by us show that in presence of heterogeneous link-probabilities the proposed estimators perform reasonably well provided that relatively large sampling fractions, say larger than 0.5, be used, whereas the estimators derived under the homogeneity assumption perform badly. The outcomes also show that the proposed confidence intervals are not very robust to deviations from the assumed models.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201500214248
    Description:

    Unit level population models are often used in model-based small area estimation of totals and means, but the models may not hold for the sample if the sampling design is informative for the model. As a result, standard methods, assuming that the model holds for the sample, can lead to biased estimators. We study alternative methods that use a suitable function of the unit selection probability as an additional auxiliary variable in the sample model. We report the results of a simulation study on the bias and mean squared error (MSE) of the proposed estimators of small area means and on the relative bias of the associated MSE estimators, using informative sampling schemes to generate the samples. Alternative methods, based on modeling the conditional expectation of the design weight as a function of the model covariates and the response, are also included in the simulation study.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201500214249
    Description:

    The problem of optimal allocation of samples in surveys using a stratified sampling plan was first discussed by Neyman in 1934. Since then, many researchers have studied the problem of the sample allocation in multivariate surveys and several methods have been proposed. Basically, these methods are divided into two classes: The first class comprises methods that seek an allocation which minimizes survey costs while keeping the coefficients of variation of estimators of totals below specified thresholds for all survey variables of interest. The second aims to minimize a weighted average of the relative variances of the estimators of totals given a maximum overall sample size or a maximum cost. This paper proposes a new optimization approach for the sample allocation problem in multivariate surveys. This approach is based on a binary integer programming formulation. Several numerical experiments showed that the proposed approach provides efficient solutions to this problem, which improve upon a ‘textbook algorithm’ and can be more efficient than the algorithm by Bethel (1985, 1989).

    Release date: 2015-12-17
Journals and periodicals (8)

Journals and periodicals (8) ((8 results))

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-645-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Aboriginal Statistics at a Glance provides data users with a thematic guide to Aboriginal data at Statistics Canada. It includes data for the First Nations (North American Indian), Métis, and Inuit populations. Each theme is illustrated with a chart presenting key indicators, a plain language definition of the indicator and links to related data tables and published articles to further assist users in meeting their data needs. Data sources include the 1996, 2001 and 2006 censuses of population, the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey, and the 2007/2008 Adult Correctional Services Survey.

    Release date: 2015-12-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-642-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in Canada was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, prepared by the Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This study paints a general statistical portrait of the official-language minority in Canada based on data from the Census of Population and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-language Minorities in Canada, conducted in 2006. The purpose of such a portrait is to present a set of characteristics, behaviours and perceptions of the official-language minority population, exploiting the analytical opportunities contained in the data.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-622-M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Canadian Economy in Transition is a series of new analytical reports that investigate the dynamics of industrial change in the Canadian economy. Many of these studies focus on the growth and development of industries that are often described as vanguards of the new economy, such as information and communications technology industries and science-based industries (heavy investors in research and development and human capital). Other studies examine the role that knowledge workers play in Canada's industrial evolution. In addition, future studies will investigate productivity performance in different industrial sectors.

    This new series brings together a coherent set of research reports that provide users with a wide variety of empirical perspectives on the economy's changing industrial structure. These perspectives include the dynamics of productivity, profitability, employment, output, investment, occupational structure and industrial geography.

    Release date: 2015-10-08

  • Journals and periodicals: 11F0027M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Economic Analysis Research Paper Series provides the circulation of research conducted by the staff of National Accounts and Analytical Studies, visiting fellows and academic associates. The research paper series is meant to stimulate discussion on a range of topics including the impact of the new economy; productivity issues; firm profitability; technology usage; the effect of financing on firm growth; depreciation functions; the use of satellite accounts; savings rates; leasing; firm dynamics; hedonic estimations; diversification patterns; investment patterns; the differences in the performance of small and large, or domestic and multinational firms; and purchasing power parity estimates. Readers of the series are encouraged to contact the authors with comments, criticisms and suggestions.

    The primary distribution medium for the papers is the Internet. These papers can be downloaded from the Internet at www.statcan.gc.ca for free. Papers in the series are distributed to Statistics Canada Regional Offices and provincial statistical focal points.

    All papers in the Economic Analysis Series go through institutional and peer review to ensure that they conform to Statistics Canada's mandate as a government statistical agency and adhere to generally accepted standards of good professional practice.

    The papers in the series often include results derived from multivariate analysis or other statistical techniques. It should be recognized that the results of these analyses are subject to uncertainty in the reported estimates.

    The level of uncertainty will depend on several factors: the nature of the functional form used in the multivariate analysis; the type of econometric technique employed; the appropriateness of the statistical assumptions embedded in the model or technique; the comprehensiveness of the variables included in the analysis; and the accuracy of the data that are utilized. The peer group review process is meant to ensure that the papers in the series have followed accepted standards to minimize problems in each of these areas.

    Release date: 2015-07-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 99-014-X
    Description:

    This topic presents data on the income of individuals, families, and households of Canada for the year 2010, including the composition of income, earnings and low-income prevalence data. The data also include the family and household incomes of Canadians by characteristics, family structure, household type and geography, as well as the total income and earnings levels of certain population groups (e.g., immigrants). The composition of income includes market income and income from government sources, and presents detailed components.

    This topic also presents data on dwelling characteristics, including number of rooms and bedrooms, condition of dwelling, period of construction, condominium status, value of dwelling, and structural type of dwelling. Data on households are also presented, including household maintainer, housing tenure, housing subsidy, housing suitability and shelter costs.

    Analytical products

    Two analytical documents provide analysis on the key findings in the data, and are complemented with the short articles found in NHS in Brief and the data in the NHS Focus on Geography Series.

    Data products

    The NHS Profile is one data product that provides a statistical overview of user selected geographic areas based on several detailed variables and/or groups of variables. Other data products include data tables which represent a series of cross tabulations ranging in complexity and are available for various levels of geography.

    Release date: 2015-05-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-202-X
    Description:

    This on-line report summarizes research and development (R&D) activities performed and funded by Canadian business enterprises and industrial research institutes and associations. The data are used, for instance, to plan and evaluate R&D tax incentive programs, to provide indicators of the state of industrial innovation and to complement national aggregates for scientific R&D expenditures and personnel. Among the topics covered are current and capital expenditures on research and development, energy R&D expenditures by area of technology, R&D expenditures as a percentage of company revenues, sources of funds for intramural R&D, personnel engaged in R&D, and foreign payments made and received for technological services. Most historical tables are presented for the latest five years and disaggregated by 46 industrial groupings, size of R&D program, employment size, revenue size, country of control, and by province.

    Release date: 2015-04-27

  • Journals and periodicals: 62-604-X
    Description:

    This paper surveys the history of Statistics Canada's Consumer Price Index (CPI) from its origins to today. It discusses changes in the construction, scope and uses of the CPI within the context of historical events.

    Release date: 2015-02-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 15-206-X
    Description:

    This reference publication on productivity in Canada shows how productivity trends affect Canadian living standards and measures the relative productivity performance of Canada and other countries. Its articles cover productivity and related issues, and it illuminates the sources underlying economic growth in Canada.

    Release date: 2015-01-26
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