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All (227) (0 to 10 of 227 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-630-X2014003
    Description:

    Canada's economic story owes much to its bountiful natural resources. The December edition of Canadian Megatrends examines the role these assets have played in the growth and development of this country.

    Release date: 2014-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2014006
    Description:

    This report examines Canadians’ social connections, using the 2013 General Social Survey on Social Identity. Three aspects are examined 1) size of social networks (number and type of social connections), 2) frequency and types of communication, and 3) characteristics of friends. The report ends with a short discussion of the possible impact of social connections on Canadians’ overall quality of life.

    Release date: 2014-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201400214089
    Description:

    This manuscript describes the use of multiple imputation to combine information from multiple surveys of the same underlying population. We use a newly developed method to generate synthetic populations nonparametrically using a finite population Bayesian bootstrap that automatically accounts for complex sample designs. We then analyze each synthetic population with standard complete-data software for simple random samples and obtain valid inference by combining the point and variance estimates using extensions of existing combining rules for synthetic data. We illustrate the approach by combining data from the 2006 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the 2006 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS).

    Release date: 2014-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201400214090
    Description:

    When studying a finite population, it is sometimes necessary to select samples from several sampling frames in order to represent all individuals. Here we are interested in the scenario where two samples are selected using a two-stage design, with common first-stage selection. We apply the Hartley (1962), Bankier (1986) and Kalton and Anderson (1986) methods, and we show that these methods can be applied conditional on first-stage selection. We also compare the performance of several estimators as part of a simulation study. Our results suggest that the estimator should be chosen carefully when there are multiple sampling frames, and that a simple estimator is sometimes preferable, even if it uses only part of the information collected.

    Release date: 2014-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201400214091
    Description:

    Parametric fractional imputation (PFI), proposed by Kim (2011), is a tool for general purpose parameter estimation under missing data. We propose a fractional hot deck imputation (FHDI) which is more robust than PFI or multiple imputation. In the proposed method, the imputed values are chosen from the set of respondents and assigned proper fractional weights. The weights are then adjusted to meet certain calibration conditions, which makes the resulting FHDI estimator efficient. Two simulation studies are presented to compare the proposed method with existing methods.

    Release date: 2014-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201400214092
    Description:

    Survey methodologists have long studied the effects of interviewers on the variance of survey estimates. Statistical models including random interviewer effects are often fitted in such investigations, and research interest lies in the magnitude of the interviewer variance component. One question that might arise in a methodological investigation is whether or not different groups of interviewers (e.g., those with prior experience on a given survey vs. new hires, or CAPI interviewers vs. CATI interviewers) have significantly different variance components in these models. Significant differences may indicate a need for additional training in particular subgroups, or sub-optimal properties of different modes or interviewing styles for particular survey items (in terms of the overall mean squared error of survey estimates). Survey researchers seeking answers to these types of questions have different statistical tools available to them. This paper aims to provide an overview of alternative frequentist and Bayesian approaches to the comparison of variance components in different groups of survey interviewers, using a hierarchical generalized linear modeling framework that accommodates a variety of different types of survey variables. We first consider the benefits and limitations of each approach, contrasting the methods used for estimation and inference. We next present a simulation study, empirically evaluating the ability of each approach to efficiently estimate differences in variance components. We then apply the two approaches to an analysis of real survey data collected in the U.S. National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG). We conclude that the two approaches tend to result in very similar inferences, and we provide suggestions for practice given some of the subtle differences observed.

    Release date: 2014-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201400214096
    Description:

    In order to obtain better coverage of the population of interest and cost less, a number of surveys employ dual frame structure, in which independent samples are taken from two overlapping sampling frames. This research considers chi-squared tests in dual frame surveys when categorical data is encountered. We extend generalized Wald’s test (Wald 1943), Rao-Scott first-order and second-order corrected tests (Rao and Scott 1981) from a single survey to a dual frame survey and derive the asymptotic distributions. Simulation studies show that both Rao-Scott type corrected tests work well and thus are recommended for use in dual frame surveys. An example is given to illustrate the usage of the developed tests.

    Release date: 2014-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201400214097
    Description:

    When monthly business surveys are not completely overlapping, there are two different estimators for the monthly growth rate of the turnover: (i) one that is based on the monthly estimated population totals and (ii) one that is purely based on enterprises observed on both occasions in the overlap of the corresponding surveys. The resulting estimates and variances might be quite different. This paper proposes an optimal composite estimator for the growth rate as well as the population totals.

    Release date: 2014-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201400214110
    Description:

    In developing the sample design for a survey we attempt to produce a good design for the funds available. Information on costs can be used to develop sample designs that minimise the sampling variance of an estimator of total for fixed cost. Improvements in survey management systems mean that it is now sometimes possible to estimate the cost of including each unit in the sample. This paper develops relatively simple approaches to determine whether the potential gains arising from using this unit level cost information are likely to be of practical use. It is shown that the key factor is the coefficient of variation of the costs relative to the coefficient of variation of the relative error on the estimated cost coefficients.

    Release date: 2014-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201400214113
    Description:

    Rotating panel surveys are used to calculate estimates of gross flows between two consecutive periods of measurement. This paper considers a general procedure for the estimation of gross flows when the rotating panel survey has been generated from a complex survey design with random nonresponse. A pseudo maximum likelihood approach is considered through a two-stage model of Markov chains for the allocation of individuals among the categories in the survey and for modeling for nonresponse.

    Release date: 2014-12-19
Stats in brief (48)

Stats in brief (48) (0 to 10 of 48 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-630-X2014003
    Description:

    Canada's economic story owes much to its bountiful natural resources. The December edition of Canadian Megatrends examines the role these assets have played in the growth and development of this country.

    Release date: 2014-12-23

  • Stats in brief: 82-625-X201400114122
    Description:

    This health fact sheet presents data on the levels of cholesterol in the Canadian population aged 18 to 79. Overall data and results by sex and age group as well as by prevalence of unhealthy levels of cholesterol and dyslipidemia are presented. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Health Measures Survey.

    Release date: 2014-12-16

  • Stats in brief: 82-625-X201400114123
    Description:

    This health fact sheet presents data on the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the Canadian population aged 18 to 79. Overall data and results by sex and age group as well as by number of metabolic syndrome components are presented. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Health Measures Survey.

    Release date: 2014-12-16

  • Stats in brief: 82-625-X201400114124
    Description:

    This health fact sheet presents data on the levels of vitamin C in the Canadian population aged 6 to 79. Overall data and results by sex and age group, smoking status and body mass index (BMI) are presented. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Health Measures Survey.

    Release date: 2014-12-16

  • Stats in brief: 82-625-X201400114125
    Description:

    This health fact sheet presents data on the levels of vitamin D in the Canadian population aged 3 to 79. Overall data and results by age group, sun exposure, racial background and body mass index (BMI) are presented. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Health Measures Survey.

    Release date: 2014-12-16

  • Stats in brief: 89-654-X2014002
    Description:

    The Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD) is a national survey of Canadians aged 15 and over whose everyday activities are limited because of a long-term condition or health-related problem.

    This document contains survey results on the number of persons with mental health disabilities, prevalence of disability, Mental Health disability by age, co-occurring disabilities, educational attainment and experiences as well as employment, Mental health disability in the work place, job modifications, hours worked, not in the labour force, job search barriers and income, for Canada.

    Release date: 2014-12-03

  • Stats in brief: 89-654-X2014003
    Description:

    The Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD) is a national survey of Canadians aged 15 and over whose everyday activities are limited because of a long-term condition or health-related problem.

    This document contains survey results on the number of persons with learning disabilities, prevalence of disability, Learning disability by age, co-occurring disabilities, educational attainment and experiences as well as employment, Mental health disability in the work place, job modifications, hours worked, not in the labour force, job search barriers and income, for Canada.

    Release date: 2014-12-03

  • Stats in brief: 11-629-X2014002
    Description:

    An animated video which illustrates the nature and breadth of the agricultural statistical data collected and disseminated by Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2014-11-28

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2014001
    Description:

    This infographic describes some results for the Digital Technology and Internet Use survey of 2013. It measures the use and adoption of various digital technologies, including the Internet. The survey focuses on the use of information and communications technologies, including personal computers, mobile devices, and the Internet, using a sample of Canadian enterprises in the private sector. The survey also provides indicators of e-commerce and website use.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2014002
    Description:

    In 2010, the Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. The CIUS consists of a household component that measures home access, and an individual component that measures online behaviours, including the use of e-commerce.

    This infographic describes some results of the Canadian Internet Use and e-Commerce survey of 2010.

    Release date: 2014-11-19
Articles and reports (173)

Articles and reports (173) (0 to 10 of 173 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2014006
    Description:

    This report examines Canadians’ social connections, using the 2013 General Social Survey on Social Identity. Three aspects are examined 1) size of social networks (number and type of social connections), 2) frequency and types of communication, and 3) characteristics of friends. The report ends with a short discussion of the possible impact of social connections on Canadians’ overall quality of life.

    Release date: 2014-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201400214089
    Description:

    This manuscript describes the use of multiple imputation to combine information from multiple surveys of the same underlying population. We use a newly developed method to generate synthetic populations nonparametrically using a finite population Bayesian bootstrap that automatically accounts for complex sample designs. We then analyze each synthetic population with standard complete-data software for simple random samples and obtain valid inference by combining the point and variance estimates using extensions of existing combining rules for synthetic data. We illustrate the approach by combining data from the 2006 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the 2006 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS).

    Release date: 2014-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201400214090
    Description:

    When studying a finite population, it is sometimes necessary to select samples from several sampling frames in order to represent all individuals. Here we are interested in the scenario where two samples are selected using a two-stage design, with common first-stage selection. We apply the Hartley (1962), Bankier (1986) and Kalton and Anderson (1986) methods, and we show that these methods can be applied conditional on first-stage selection. We also compare the performance of several estimators as part of a simulation study. Our results suggest that the estimator should be chosen carefully when there are multiple sampling frames, and that a simple estimator is sometimes preferable, even if it uses only part of the information collected.

    Release date: 2014-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201400214091
    Description:

    Parametric fractional imputation (PFI), proposed by Kim (2011), is a tool for general purpose parameter estimation under missing data. We propose a fractional hot deck imputation (FHDI) which is more robust than PFI or multiple imputation. In the proposed method, the imputed values are chosen from the set of respondents and assigned proper fractional weights. The weights are then adjusted to meet certain calibration conditions, which makes the resulting FHDI estimator efficient. Two simulation studies are presented to compare the proposed method with existing methods.

    Release date: 2014-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201400214092
    Description:

    Survey methodologists have long studied the effects of interviewers on the variance of survey estimates. Statistical models including random interviewer effects are often fitted in such investigations, and research interest lies in the magnitude of the interviewer variance component. One question that might arise in a methodological investigation is whether or not different groups of interviewers (e.g., those with prior experience on a given survey vs. new hires, or CAPI interviewers vs. CATI interviewers) have significantly different variance components in these models. Significant differences may indicate a need for additional training in particular subgroups, or sub-optimal properties of different modes or interviewing styles for particular survey items (in terms of the overall mean squared error of survey estimates). Survey researchers seeking answers to these types of questions have different statistical tools available to them. This paper aims to provide an overview of alternative frequentist and Bayesian approaches to the comparison of variance components in different groups of survey interviewers, using a hierarchical generalized linear modeling framework that accommodates a variety of different types of survey variables. We first consider the benefits and limitations of each approach, contrasting the methods used for estimation and inference. We next present a simulation study, empirically evaluating the ability of each approach to efficiently estimate differences in variance components. We then apply the two approaches to an analysis of real survey data collected in the U.S. National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG). We conclude that the two approaches tend to result in very similar inferences, and we provide suggestions for practice given some of the subtle differences observed.

    Release date: 2014-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201400214096
    Description:

    In order to obtain better coverage of the population of interest and cost less, a number of surveys employ dual frame structure, in which independent samples are taken from two overlapping sampling frames. This research considers chi-squared tests in dual frame surveys when categorical data is encountered. We extend generalized Wald’s test (Wald 1943), Rao-Scott first-order and second-order corrected tests (Rao and Scott 1981) from a single survey to a dual frame survey and derive the asymptotic distributions. Simulation studies show that both Rao-Scott type corrected tests work well and thus are recommended for use in dual frame surveys. An example is given to illustrate the usage of the developed tests.

    Release date: 2014-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201400214097
    Description:

    When monthly business surveys are not completely overlapping, there are two different estimators for the monthly growth rate of the turnover: (i) one that is based on the monthly estimated population totals and (ii) one that is purely based on enterprises observed on both occasions in the overlap of the corresponding surveys. The resulting estimates and variances might be quite different. This paper proposes an optimal composite estimator for the growth rate as well as the population totals.

    Release date: 2014-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201400214110
    Description:

    In developing the sample design for a survey we attempt to produce a good design for the funds available. Information on costs can be used to develop sample designs that minimise the sampling variance of an estimator of total for fixed cost. Improvements in survey management systems mean that it is now sometimes possible to estimate the cost of including each unit in the sample. This paper develops relatively simple approaches to determine whether the potential gains arising from using this unit level cost information are likely to be of practical use. It is shown that the key factor is the coefficient of variation of the costs relative to the coefficient of variation of the relative error on the estimated cost coefficients.

    Release date: 2014-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201400214113
    Description:

    Rotating panel surveys are used to calculate estimates of gross flows between two consecutive periods of measurement. This paper considers a general procedure for the estimation of gross flows when the rotating panel survey has been generated from a complex survey design with random nonresponse. A pseudo maximum likelihood approach is considered through a two-stage model of Markov chains for the allocation of individuals among the categories in the survey and for modeling for nonresponse.

    Release date: 2014-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201400214118
    Description:

    Bagging is a powerful computational method used to improve the performance of inefficient estimators. This article is a first exploration of the use of bagging in survey estimation, and we investigate the effects of bagging on non-differentiable survey estimators including sample distribution functions and quantiles, among others. The theoretical properties of bagged survey estimators are investigated under both design-based and model-based regimes. In particular, we show the design consistency of the bagged estimators, and obtain the asymptotic normality of the estimators in the model-based context. The article describes how implementation of bagging for survey estimators can take advantage of replicates developed for survey variance estimation, providing an easy way for practitioners to apply bagging in existing surveys. A major remaining challenge in implementing bagging in the survey context is variance estimation for the bagged estimators themselves, and we explore two possible variance estimation approaches. Simulation experiments reveal the improvement of the proposed bagging estimator relative to the original estimator and compare the two variance estimation approaches.

    Release date: 2014-12-19
Journals and periodicals (6)

Journals and periodicals (6) ((6 results))

  • Journals and periodicals: 75-513-X
    Description:

    The Canadian Income Survey (CIS) is a cross-sectional survey developed to assess the economic well-being of individuals and families in Canada. It provides a portrait of the income and income sources of Canadians, with their individual and household characteristics.

    Release date: 2014-12-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-595-M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This series analyses current issues in culture, tourism and education. Arts and culture issues include the economic impact of culture, the consumption of culture goods and services, government, personal and corporate spending on culture, the culture labour market, and international trade of culture goods and services. Travel and tourism issues cover both domestic and international tourism. Issues in education, training and literacy include accessibility, national and international student performance assessments, school-work transitions, adult education, lifelong learning, use of technology, alternate forms of delivery and outcomes.The research papers are intended to stimulate discussion. Readers are encouraged to contact the authors with comments, criticisms and suggestions.

    Release date: 2014-11-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-655-X
    Description:

    Many of the 60 or so Aboriginal languages in Canada are considered endangered to varying degrees for their long-term survival. Assessing language vitality or endangerment through the measurement of various factors can provide useful information to help ensure the continuity of a language. This paper illustrates how the 2011 Census of Population and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) can be used to measure some of the factors that provide information related to the vitality of Aboriginal languages.

    Release date: 2014-10-16

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-003-X
    Description:

    Canadian Demographics at a glance is designed to gather a maximum of demographic information in a single document, giving users an easily and quickly accessible up-to-date picture of the Canadian population. It presents data on demographic growth, fertility, mortality, migratory movements, aging and ethno-cultural diversity of the population in the form of tables and graphs accompanied by a brief analytical commentary.

    Release date: 2014-06-19

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-204-X
    Description:

    This report provides statistical information of the federal government's activities in science and technology. It covers expenditures and person-years by type of science, performing sectors, provinces and federal departments and agencies. Technical notes, definitions, bibliography and subject index are included.

    Release date: 2014-06-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 61-205-X
    Description:

    This publication presents capital and repair expenditures on construction and on machinery and equipment for divisions and industries at the Canada level and by division at the provincial level. The report also provides the split between private and public investment. The tabulations focus on capital spending intentions for the coming year, preliminary estimates of actual investment for the current year and the actual investment for the previous year. The investment data are gathered from about 25,000 establishments and establishment groups in Canadian businesses, institutions and governments.

    Release date: 2014-02-28
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