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  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20181733660
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2018-06-22

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20181733665
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2018-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800154925
    Description:

    This paper develops statistical inference based on super population model in a finite population setting using ranked set samples (RSS). The samples are constructed without replacement. It is shown that the sample mean of RSS is model unbiased and has smaller mean square prediction error (MSPE) than the MSPE of a simple random sample mean. Using an unbiased estimator of MSPE, the paper also constructs a prediction confidence interval for the population mean. A small scale simulation study shows that estimator is as good as a simple random sample (SRS) estimator for poor ranking information. On the other hand it has higher efficiency than SRS estimator when the quality of ranking information is good, and the cost ratio of obtaining a single unit in RSS and SRS is not very high. Simulation study also indicates that coverage probabilities of prediction intervals are very close to the nominal coverage probabilities. Proposed inferential procedure is applied to a real data set.

    Release date: 2018-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800154926
    Description:

    This paper investigates the linearization and bootstrap variance estimation for the Gini coefficient and the change between Gini indexes at two periods of time. For the one-sample case, we use the influence function linearization approach suggested by Deville (1999), the without-replacement bootstrap suggested by Gross (1980) for simple random sampling without replacement and the with-replacement of primary sampling units described in Rao and Wu (1988) for multistage sampling. To obtain a two-sample variance estimator, we use the linearization technique by means of partial influence functions (Goga, Deville and Ruiz-Gazen, 2009). We also develop an extension of the studied bootstrap procedures for two-dimensional sampling. The two approaches are compared on simulated data.

    Release date: 2018-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800154927
    Description:

    Benchmarking monthly or quarterly series to annual data is a common practice in many National Statistical Institutes. The benchmarking problem arises when time series data for the same target variable are measured at different frequencies and there is a need to remove discrepancies between the sums of the sub-annual values and their annual benchmarks. Several benchmarking methods are available in the literature. The Growth Rates Preservation (GRP) benchmarking procedure is often considered the best method. It is often claimed that this procedure is grounded on an ideal movement preservation principle. However, we show that there are important drawbacks to GRP, relevant for practical applications, that are unknown in the literature. Alternative benchmarking models will be considered that do not suffer from some of GRP’s side effects.

    Release date: 2018-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800154928
    Description:

    A two-phase process was used by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration to estimate the proportion of US adults with serious mental illness (SMI). The first phase was the annual National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), while the second phase was a random subsample of adult respondents to the NSDUH. Respondents to the second phase of sampling were clinically evaluated for serious mental illness. A logistic prediction model was fit to this subsample with the SMI status (yes or no) determined by the second-phase instrument treated as the dependent variable and related variables collected on the NSDUH from all adults as the model’s explanatory variables. Estimates were then computed for SMI prevalence among all adults and within adult subpopulations by assigning an SMI status to each NSDUH respondent based on comparing his (her) estimated probability of having SMI to a chosen cut point on the distribution of the predicted probabilities. We investigate alternatives to this standard cut point estimator such as the probability estimator. The latter assigns an estimated probability of having SMI to each NSDUH respondent. The estimated prevalence of SMI is the weighted mean of those estimated probabilities. Using data from NSDUH and its subsample, we show that, although the probability estimator has a smaller mean squared error when estimating SMI prevalence among all adults, it has a greater tendency to be biased at the subpopulation level than the standard cut point estimator.

    Release date: 2018-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800154929
    Description:

    The U.S. Census Bureau is investigating nonrespondent subsampling strategies for usage in the 2017 Economic Census. Design constraints include a mandated lower bound on the unit response rate, along with targeted industry-specific response rates. This paper presents research on allocation procedures for subsampling nonrespondents, conditional on the subsampling being systematic. We consider two approaches: (1) equal-probability sampling and (2) optimized allocation with constraints on unit response rates and sample size with the objective of selecting larger samples in industries that have initially lower response rates. We present a simulation study that examines the relative bias and mean squared error for the proposed allocations, assessing each procedure’s sensitivity to the size of the subsample, the response propensities, and the estimation procedure.

    Release date: 2018-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800154959
    Description:

    Small area models handling area level data typically assume normality of random effects. This assumption does not always work. The present paper introduces a new small area model with t random effects. Along with this, this paper also considers joint modeling of small area means and variances. The present approach is shown to perform better than other methods.

    Release date: 2018-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800154963
    Description:

    The probability-sampling-based framework has dominated survey research because it provides precise mathematical tools to assess sampling variability. However increasing costs and declining response rates are expanding the use of non-probability samples, particularly in general population settings, where samples of individuals pulled from web surveys are becoming increasingly cheap and easy to access. But non-probability samples are at risk for selection bias due to differential access, degrees of interest, and other factors. Calibration to known statistical totals in the population provide a means of potentially diminishing the effect of selection bias in non-probability samples. Here we show that model calibration using adaptive LASSO can yield a consistent estimator of a population total as long as a subset of the true predictors is included in the prediction model, thus allowing large numbers of possible covariates to be included without risk of overfitting. We show that the model calibration using adaptive LASSO provides improved estimation with respect to mean square error relative to standard competitors such as generalized regression (GREG) estimators when a large number of covariates are required to determine the true model, with effectively no loss in efficiency over GREG when smaller models will suffice. We also derive closed form variance estimators of population totals, and compare their behavior with bootstrap estimators. We conclude with a real world example using data from the National Health Interview Survey.

    Release date: 2018-06-21

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20181723537
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2018-06-21
Stats in brief (1,301)

Stats in brief (1,301) (0 to 10 of 1,301 results)

Articles and reports (5,413)

Articles and reports (5,413) (0 to 10 of 5,413 results)

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800154925
    Description:

    This paper develops statistical inference based on super population model in a finite population setting using ranked set samples (RSS). The samples are constructed without replacement. It is shown that the sample mean of RSS is model unbiased and has smaller mean square prediction error (MSPE) than the MSPE of a simple random sample mean. Using an unbiased estimator of MSPE, the paper also constructs a prediction confidence interval for the population mean. A small scale simulation study shows that estimator is as good as a simple random sample (SRS) estimator for poor ranking information. On the other hand it has higher efficiency than SRS estimator when the quality of ranking information is good, and the cost ratio of obtaining a single unit in RSS and SRS is not very high. Simulation study also indicates that coverage probabilities of prediction intervals are very close to the nominal coverage probabilities. Proposed inferential procedure is applied to a real data set.

    Release date: 2018-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800154926
    Description:

    This paper investigates the linearization and bootstrap variance estimation for the Gini coefficient and the change between Gini indexes at two periods of time. For the one-sample case, we use the influence function linearization approach suggested by Deville (1999), the without-replacement bootstrap suggested by Gross (1980) for simple random sampling without replacement and the with-replacement of primary sampling units described in Rao and Wu (1988) for multistage sampling. To obtain a two-sample variance estimator, we use the linearization technique by means of partial influence functions (Goga, Deville and Ruiz-Gazen, 2009). We also develop an extension of the studied bootstrap procedures for two-dimensional sampling. The two approaches are compared on simulated data.

    Release date: 2018-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800154927
    Description:

    Benchmarking monthly or quarterly series to annual data is a common practice in many National Statistical Institutes. The benchmarking problem arises when time series data for the same target variable are measured at different frequencies and there is a need to remove discrepancies between the sums of the sub-annual values and their annual benchmarks. Several benchmarking methods are available in the literature. The Growth Rates Preservation (GRP) benchmarking procedure is often considered the best method. It is often claimed that this procedure is grounded on an ideal movement preservation principle. However, we show that there are important drawbacks to GRP, relevant for practical applications, that are unknown in the literature. Alternative benchmarking models will be considered that do not suffer from some of GRP’s side effects.

    Release date: 2018-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800154928
    Description:

    A two-phase process was used by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration to estimate the proportion of US adults with serious mental illness (SMI). The first phase was the annual National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), while the second phase was a random subsample of adult respondents to the NSDUH. Respondents to the second phase of sampling were clinically evaluated for serious mental illness. A logistic prediction model was fit to this subsample with the SMI status (yes or no) determined by the second-phase instrument treated as the dependent variable and related variables collected on the NSDUH from all adults as the model’s explanatory variables. Estimates were then computed for SMI prevalence among all adults and within adult subpopulations by assigning an SMI status to each NSDUH respondent based on comparing his (her) estimated probability of having SMI to a chosen cut point on the distribution of the predicted probabilities. We investigate alternatives to this standard cut point estimator such as the probability estimator. The latter assigns an estimated probability of having SMI to each NSDUH respondent. The estimated prevalence of SMI is the weighted mean of those estimated probabilities. Using data from NSDUH and its subsample, we show that, although the probability estimator has a smaller mean squared error when estimating SMI prevalence among all adults, it has a greater tendency to be biased at the subpopulation level than the standard cut point estimator.

    Release date: 2018-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800154929
    Description:

    The U.S. Census Bureau is investigating nonrespondent subsampling strategies for usage in the 2017 Economic Census. Design constraints include a mandated lower bound on the unit response rate, along with targeted industry-specific response rates. This paper presents research on allocation procedures for subsampling nonrespondents, conditional on the subsampling being systematic. We consider two approaches: (1) equal-probability sampling and (2) optimized allocation with constraints on unit response rates and sample size with the objective of selecting larger samples in industries that have initially lower response rates. We present a simulation study that examines the relative bias and mean squared error for the proposed allocations, assessing each procedure’s sensitivity to the size of the subsample, the response propensities, and the estimation procedure.

    Release date: 2018-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800154959
    Description:

    Small area models handling area level data typically assume normality of random effects. This assumption does not always work. The present paper introduces a new small area model with t random effects. Along with this, this paper also considers joint modeling of small area means and variances. The present approach is shown to perform better than other methods.

    Release date: 2018-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800154963
    Description:

    The probability-sampling-based framework has dominated survey research because it provides precise mathematical tools to assess sampling variability. However increasing costs and declining response rates are expanding the use of non-probability samples, particularly in general population settings, where samples of individuals pulled from web surveys are becoming increasingly cheap and easy to access. But non-probability samples are at risk for selection bias due to differential access, degrees of interest, and other factors. Calibration to known statistical totals in the population provide a means of potentially diminishing the effect of selection bias in non-probability samples. Here we show that model calibration using adaptive LASSO can yield a consistent estimator of a population total as long as a subset of the true predictors is included in the prediction model, thus allowing large numbers of possible covariates to be included without risk of overfitting. We show that the model calibration using adaptive LASSO provides improved estimation with respect to mean square error relative to standard competitors such as generalized regression (GREG) estimators when a large number of covariates are required to determine the true model, with effectively no loss in efficiency over GREG when smaller models will suffice. We also derive closed form variance estimators of population totals, and compare their behavior with bootstrap estimators. We conclude with a real world example using data from the National Health Interview Survey.

    Release date: 2018-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201800654970
    Description:

    Using data from the first four cycles of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS), this study describes the prevalence of hypertension control among women and men aged 60 to 79 taking antihypertensive medication. It also examines factors that may explain some of the sex differences in hypertension control.

    Release date: 2018-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201800654971
    Description:

    This study describes acute care hospitalizations for mental/behavioural disorders among First Nations people living on and off reserve. The 2006 Census was linked to the Discharge Abstract Database from 2006/2007 through 2008/2009 for all provinces (except Ontario and Quebec) and the three territories. Hospitalizations for seven types of disorders were identified.

    Release date: 2018-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201800154972
    Description:

    This Juristat article provides a statistical overview of adults and youth admitted to and released from custody and community supervision in Canada in 2016/2017. Analysis is presented at the national as well as the provincial and territorial levels. Average counts and the incarceration rates are presented. Admissions and the characteristics of adults and youth in the correctional system (such as age, sex and Aboriginal identity) are also discussed.

    Release date: 2018-06-19
Journals and periodicals (302)

Journals and periodicals (302) (0 to 10 of 302 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-632-X
    Description:

    The newsletter offers information aimed at three main groups, businesses (small to medium), communities and ethno-cultural groups/communities. Articles and outreach materials will assist their understanding of national and local data from the many relevant sources found on the Statistics Canada website.

    Release date: 2018-06-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 12-001-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The journal publishes articles dealing with various aspects of statistical development relevant to a statistical agency, such as design issues in the context of practical constraints, use of different data sources and collection techniques, total survey error, survey evaluation, research in survey methodology, time series analysis, seasonal adjustment, demographic studies, data integration, estimation and data analysis methods, and general survey systems development. The emphasis is placed on the development and evaluation of specific methodologies as applied to data collection or the data themselves.

    Release date: 2018-06-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 82-003-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Health Reports, published by the Health Analysis Division of Statistics Canada, is a peer-reviewed journal of population health and health services research. It is designed for a broad audience that includes health professionals, researchers, policymakers, and the general public. The journal publishes articles of wide interest that contain original and timely analyses of national or provincial/territorial surveys or administrative databases. New articles are published electronically each month.

    Health Reports had an impact factor of 2.479 for 2016 and a five-year impact factor of 3.959. All articles are indexed in PubMed. Our online catalogue is free and receives more than 500,000 visits per year. External submissions are welcome.

    Release date: 2018-06-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-002-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication provides in-depth analysis and detailed statistics on a variety of topics and issues related to justice and public safety. Topics include crime, victimization, homicide, civil, family and criminal courts, and correctional services. Issues related to community safety, and perceptions of safety are also covered. The publication is intended for those with an interest in Canada's justice and public safety systems as well as those who plan, establish, administer and evaluate programs and projects related to justice and public safety.

    Release date: 2018-06-19

  • Journals and periodicals: 11F0019M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series provides for the circulation of research conducted by Analytical Studies Branch staff and collaborators. The Series is intended to stimulate discussion on a variety of topics, such as labour, immigration, education and skills, income mobility, well-being, aging, firm dynamics, productivity, economic transitions, and economic geography. Readers of the Series are encouraged to contact the authors with their comments and suggestions. All the papers in the Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series go through institutional and peer review to ensure that they conform to Statistics Canada's mandate as a governmental statistical agency and adhere to generally accepted standards of good professional practice.

    Release date: 2018-06-18

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-631-X
    Description:

    Statistics Canada engages regularly with Canadians to discuss statistical findings about the country’s economy, society and environment. Events are held in various cities throughout the year to discuss the use of statistics in many fields. These events provide Statistics Canada with an opportunity to promote the role of official statistics and better understand data users’ needs.

    This series provides online access to the presentations that were made at outreach events with data users.

    Release date: 2018-06-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 75-006-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of data sources in order to provide information on various aspects of Canadian society, including labour, income, education, social, and demographic issues, that affect the lives of Canadians.

    Release date: 2018-06-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-627-M
    Description:

    Every year, Statistics Canada collects data from hundreds of surveys. As the amount of data gathered increases, Statistics Canada has introduced infographics to help people, business owners, academics, and management at all levels, understand key information derived from the data. Infographics can be used to quickly communicate a message, to simplify the presentation of large amounts of data, to see data patterns and relationships, and to monitor changes in variables over time.

    These infographics will provide a quick overview of Statistics Canada survey data.

    Release date: 2018-06-08

  • Journals and periodicals: 16-508-X
    Description:

    Environment fact sheets will include short, focused, single-theme analysis on key issues within the changing environment with regards to all Canadians. Over the course of the series, analysis will include topics on: air and climate, pollution and waste, environmental protection and quality, and natural resources.

    Release date: 2018-06-05

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-209-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada analyses recent demographic patterns at the national, provincial and subprovincial levels. Trends in population growth and the evolution of the various components of Canada's population growth - fertility, mortality and migration (interprovincial and international) - as well as marital status, are examined. The Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada has been published annually or biennially since 1985. Beginning in 2011, the Report is available as a dynamic, internet-only publication in order to provide the most recent data and analyses on Canadian demographics as soon as they are available.

    Release date: 2018-06-05
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