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COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (391) (0 to 10 of 391 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2019014
    Description:

    The Market Basket Measure includes a dimension that defines a family's disposable income. This discussion paper describes considerations for updating the disposable income component and changes to the methodology used for its determination.

    Release date: 2019-12-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 16-002-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The articles published in EnviroStats use statistics to illustrate topical environmental issues. The publication is intended for a general readership rather than an expert audience.

    Release date: 2019-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X201900100001
    Description:

    The manner in which Canadians conduct their daily activities can have a profound impact on their surroundings thereby compelling them to adapt their practices to be less harmful to the environment. This is even more of a reality for Canadian businesses as their operations are significant contributors to the amount of pollution and environmental pressures generated each year in Canada. For this reason, it is important to monitor the amount and the type of environmental protection that Canadian industry has undertaken over the years. The article highlights expenditures made by Canadian industry to protect the environment from industrial activities between 2006 and 2016. The main data source for this paper is the Environmental Protection Expenditures Survey (EPES), which is conducted every two years. Several graphs and a summary of findings are included.

    Release date: 2019-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201901200001
    Description:

    In Canada, estimating the life expectancy of Indigenous populations is methodologically challenging since death registrations do not usually collect information on whether the deceased was Indigenous. For the first time in Canada, a series of census-mortality linked datasets has been created that can be used to estimate trends in life expectancies among Indigenous household populations enumerated by a census. The objectives of this article are to 1) estimate life expectancy for First Nations people, Métis and Inuit at various ages and by sex for 2011, and compare it with that of the non-Indigenous population 2) examine trends in longevity since 1996 for First Nations people, Métis and Inuit and the non-Indigenous population, and estimate whether the disparity between Indigenous populations and the non-Indigenous population has changed over time. In doing so, this study aims to fill an important information gap by providing a national picture of the life expectancy of First Nations people, Métis and Inuit.

    Release date: 2019-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201901200002
    Description:

    The routine measurement of population health status indicators like mortality is important to assess progress in the reduction of inequalities. Previous studies of mortality inequalities have relied on area-based measures of socioeconomic indicators. A new series of census-mortality linked datasets has been created in Canada to quantify mortality inequalities based on individual-level data and examine whether these inequalities have changed over time. This study used the 1991, 1996, 2001, 2006, and 2011 Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohorts (CanCHECs) with five years of mortality follow-up. It estimated age-standardized mortality rates by sex according to income quintile and highest level of educational attainment categories for the household population aged 25 or older.

    Release date: 2019-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201901200003
    Description:

    This article provides a description of the Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohorts (CanCHECs), a population-based linked datasets of the household population at the time of census collection. The CanCHEC datasets are rich national data resources that can be used to measure and examine health inequalities across socioeconomic and ethnocultural dimensions for different periods and locations. These datasets can also be used to examine the effects of exposure to environmental factors on human health.

    Release date: 2019-12-18

  • Stats in brief: 11-629-X2019006
    Description:

    This video describes a new health surveillance program at Statistics Canada: The Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohorts (CanCHECs). The video describes the attributes of and the datasets included in the CanCHECs, how the CanCHECs can be used, and their strengths and limitations. Recent examples of research projects based on the CanCHECs are presented along with information about how to apply for access to these data.

    Release date: 2019-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900300001
    Description:

    Standard linearization estimators of the variance of the general regression estimator are often too small, leading to confidence intervals that do not cover at the desired rate. Hat matrix adjustments can be used in two-stage sampling that help remedy this problem. We present theory for several new variance estimators and compare them to standard estimators in a series of simulations. The proposed estimators correct negative biases and improve confidence interval coverage rates in a variety of situations that mirror ones that are met in practice.

    Release date: 2019-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900300002
    Description:

    Paradata is often collected during the survey process to monitor the quality of the survey response. One such paradata is a respondent behavior, which can be used to construct response models. The propensity score weight using the respondent behavior information can be applied to the final analysis to reduce the nonresponse bias. However, including the surrogate variable in the propensity score weighting does not always guarantee the efficiency gain. We show that the surrogate variable is useful only when it is correlated with the study variable. Results from a limited simulation study confirm the finding. A real data application using the Korean Workplace Panel Survey data is also presented.

    Release date: 2019-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900300003
    Description:

    The widely used formulas for the variance of the ratio estimator may lead to serious underestimates when the sample size is small; see Sukhatme (1954), Koop (1968), Rao (1969), and Cochran (1977, pages 163-164). In order to solve this classical problem, we propose in this paper new estimators for the variance and the mean square error of the ratio estimator that do not suffer from such a large negative bias. Similar estimation formulas can be derived for alternative ratio estimators as discussed in Tin (1965). We compare three mean square error estimators for the ratio estimator in a simulation study.

    Release date: 2019-12-17
Stats in brief (106)

Stats in brief (106) (0 to 10 of 106 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-629-X2019006
    Description:

    This video describes a new health surveillance program at Statistics Canada: The Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohorts (CanCHECs). The video describes the attributes of and the datasets included in the CanCHECs, how the CanCHECs can be used, and their strengths and limitations. Recent examples of research projects based on the CanCHECs are presented along with information about how to apply for access to these data.

    Release date: 2019-12-18

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019089
    Description:

    This infographic provides information on the number and characteristics of gig workers, including gender, regional, and occupational differences.

    Release date: 2019-12-16

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019090
    Description:

    This infographic uses census data from 2006 and 2016 to examine the trends associated with English-French bilingualism among Canadian children and youth who were aged 5 to 17.

    Release date: 2019-12-16

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019085
    Description:

    This infographic compares trends in over-education among recent immigrants and Canadian-born youth and examines the skill utilization and earnings of employed STEM-educated immigrants by field of study and degree level.

    Release date: 2019-12-13

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019087
    Description:

    This infographic uses administrative tax data to provide a visual representation of non-financial co-operatives in Canada in 2018. Presented data includes counts of co-operatives at the national and provincial levels, as well as financial and employment statistics.

    Release date: 2019-12-13

  • Stats in brief: 11-629-X2019002
    Description:

    Recording of webinar session on the topic of Navigating Statistics Canada's Website. This is a real time recording of an online webinar hosted by the Data Service Centres in the Spring of 2019.

    Release date: 2019-12-12

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019080
    Description:

    This infographic features registered apprentices across Canada as well as those who became certified in a trade.

    Release date: 2019-12-11

  • Stats in brief: 11-629-X2019005
    Description:

    Join Statistic Canada in celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Official Languages Act. This video helps to better understand how official laguages data can answer your questions.

    Release date: 2019-12-10

  • Stats in brief: 85-005-X201900100001
    Description:

    This Juristat Bulletin-Quick Fact examines Canadian's perceptions of and attitudes towards gender-based violence, gender equality, and gender expression.

    Release date: 2019-12-09

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019084
    Description:

    This infographic examines Canadians' perceptions related to gender-based violence and gender equality, using data from the Survey of Safety in Public and Private Spaces.

    Release date: 2019-12-09
Articles and reports (262)

Articles and reports (262) (0 to 10 of 262 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2019014
    Description:

    The Market Basket Measure includes a dimension that defines a family's disposable income. This discussion paper describes considerations for updating the disposable income component and changes to the methodology used for its determination.

    Release date: 2019-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X201900100001
    Description:

    The manner in which Canadians conduct their daily activities can have a profound impact on their surroundings thereby compelling them to adapt their practices to be less harmful to the environment. This is even more of a reality for Canadian businesses as their operations are significant contributors to the amount of pollution and environmental pressures generated each year in Canada. For this reason, it is important to monitor the amount and the type of environmental protection that Canadian industry has undertaken over the years. The article highlights expenditures made by Canadian industry to protect the environment from industrial activities between 2006 and 2016. The main data source for this paper is the Environmental Protection Expenditures Survey (EPES), which is conducted every two years. Several graphs and a summary of findings are included.

    Release date: 2019-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201901200001
    Description:

    In Canada, estimating the life expectancy of Indigenous populations is methodologically challenging since death registrations do not usually collect information on whether the deceased was Indigenous. For the first time in Canada, a series of census-mortality linked datasets has been created that can be used to estimate trends in life expectancies among Indigenous household populations enumerated by a census. The objectives of this article are to 1) estimate life expectancy for First Nations people, Métis and Inuit at various ages and by sex for 2011, and compare it with that of the non-Indigenous population 2) examine trends in longevity since 1996 for First Nations people, Métis and Inuit and the non-Indigenous population, and estimate whether the disparity between Indigenous populations and the non-Indigenous population has changed over time. In doing so, this study aims to fill an important information gap by providing a national picture of the life expectancy of First Nations people, Métis and Inuit.

    Release date: 2019-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201901200002
    Description:

    The routine measurement of population health status indicators like mortality is important to assess progress in the reduction of inequalities. Previous studies of mortality inequalities have relied on area-based measures of socioeconomic indicators. A new series of census-mortality linked datasets has been created in Canada to quantify mortality inequalities based on individual-level data and examine whether these inequalities have changed over time. This study used the 1991, 1996, 2001, 2006, and 2011 Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohorts (CanCHECs) with five years of mortality follow-up. It estimated age-standardized mortality rates by sex according to income quintile and highest level of educational attainment categories for the household population aged 25 or older.

    Release date: 2019-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201901200003
    Description:

    This article provides a description of the Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohorts (CanCHECs), a population-based linked datasets of the household population at the time of census collection. The CanCHEC datasets are rich national data resources that can be used to measure and examine health inequalities across socioeconomic and ethnocultural dimensions for different periods and locations. These datasets can also be used to examine the effects of exposure to environmental factors on human health.

    Release date: 2019-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900300001
    Description:

    Standard linearization estimators of the variance of the general regression estimator are often too small, leading to confidence intervals that do not cover at the desired rate. Hat matrix adjustments can be used in two-stage sampling that help remedy this problem. We present theory for several new variance estimators and compare them to standard estimators in a series of simulations. The proposed estimators correct negative biases and improve confidence interval coverage rates in a variety of situations that mirror ones that are met in practice.

    Release date: 2019-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900300002
    Description:

    Paradata is often collected during the survey process to monitor the quality of the survey response. One such paradata is a respondent behavior, which can be used to construct response models. The propensity score weight using the respondent behavior information can be applied to the final analysis to reduce the nonresponse bias. However, including the surrogate variable in the propensity score weighting does not always guarantee the efficiency gain. We show that the surrogate variable is useful only when it is correlated with the study variable. Results from a limited simulation study confirm the finding. A real data application using the Korean Workplace Panel Survey data is also presented.

    Release date: 2019-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900300003
    Description:

    The widely used formulas for the variance of the ratio estimator may lead to serious underestimates when the sample size is small; see Sukhatme (1954), Koop (1968), Rao (1969), and Cochran (1977, pages 163-164). In order to solve this classical problem, we propose in this paper new estimators for the variance and the mean square error of the ratio estimator that do not suffer from such a large negative bias. Similar estimation formulas can be derived for alternative ratio estimators as discussed in Tin (1965). We compare three mean square error estimators for the ratio estimator in a simulation study.

    Release date: 2019-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900300004
    Description:

    Social or economic studies often need to have a global view of society. For example, in agricultural studies, the characteristics of farms can be linked to the social activities of individuals. Hence, studies of a given phenomenon should be done by considering variables of interest referring to different target populations that are related to each other. In order to get an insight into an underlying phenomenon, the observations must be carried out in an integrated way, in which the units of a given population have to be observed jointly with related units of the other population. In the agricultural example, this means that a sample of rural households should be selected that have some relationship with the farm sample to be used for the study. There are several ways to select integrated samples. This paper studies the problem of defining an optimal sampling strategy for this situation: the solution proposed minimizes the sampling cost, ensuring a predefined estimation precision for the variables of interest (of either one or both populations) describing the phenomenon. Indirect sampling provides a natural framework for this setting since the units belonging to a population can become carriers of information on another population that is the object of a given survey. The problem is studied for different contexts which characterize the information concerning the links available in the sampling design phase, ranging from situations in which the links among the different units are known in the design phase to a situation in which the available information on links is very poor. An empirical study of agricultural data for a developing country is presented. It shows how controlling the inclusion probabilities at the design phase using the available information (namely the links) is effective, can significantly reduce the errors of the estimates for the indirectly observed population. The need for good models for predicting the unknown variables or the links is also demonstrated.

    Release date: 2019-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900300005
    Description:

    Monthly estimates of provincial unemployment based on the Dutch Labour Force Survey (LFS) are obtained using time series models. The models account for rotation group bias and serial correlation due to the rotating panel design of the LFS. This paper compares two approaches of estimating structural time series models (STM). In the first approach STMs are expressed as state space models, fitted using a Kalman filter and smoother in a frequentist framework. As an alternative, these STMs are expressed as time series multilevel models in an hierarchical Bayesian framework, and estimated using a Gibbs sampler. Monthly unemployment estimates and standard errors based on these models are compared for the twelve provinces of the Netherlands. Pros and cons of the multilevel approach and state space approach are discussed. Multivariate STMs are appropriate to borrow strength over time and space. Modeling the full correlation matrix between time series components rapidly increases the numbers of hyperparameters to be estimated. Modeling common factors is one possibility to obtain more parsimonious models that still account for cross-sectional correlation. In this paper an even more parsimonious approach is proposed, where domains share one overall trend, and have their own independent trends for the domain-specific deviations from this overall trend. The time series modeling approach is particularly appropriate to estimate month-to-month change of unemployment.

    Release date: 2019-12-17
Journals and periodicals (23)

Journals and periodicals (23) (0 to 10 of 23 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 16-002-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The articles published in EnviroStats use statistics to illustrate topical environmental issues. The publication is intended for a general readership rather than an expert audience.

    Release date: 2019-12-18

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-621-M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The papers published in the Analysis in Brief analytical series shed light on current economic issues. Aimed at a general audience, they cover a wide range of topics including National Accounts, business enterprises, trade, transportation, agriculture, the environment, manufacturing, science and technology, services, etc.

    Release date: 2019-12-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-005-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication features short, informative articles focusing on specific justice-related issues. For more in-depth articles on justice in Canada, see also Juristat, Catalogue no. 85-002-X.

    Release date: 2019-12-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 46-28-0001
    Description:

    This publication provides insights on housing data and analysis at Statistics Canada. Readers can access in-depth information on the latest housing data released by the Agency. The series relies on both descriptive and analytical methods to analyze administrative and survey data sets that relate to housing.

    Release date: 2019-12-05

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-654-X
    Description:

    The Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD) is a national survey of Canadians aged 15 and over whose everyday activities are limited because of a long-term condition or health-related problem.

    Release date: 2019-12-03

  • Journals and periodicals: 82-221-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Over 80 indicators measure the health of the Canadian population and the effectiveness of the health care system. Designed to provide comparable information at the health region and provincial/territorial levels, these data are produced from a wide range of the most recently available sources.

    This Internet publication is produced by Statistics Canada and the Canadian Institute for Health Information.

    Release date: 2019-11-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 12-206-X
    Description:

    This report summarizes the achievements program sponsored by the three methodology divisions of Statistics Canada. This program covers research and development activities in statistical methods with potentially broad application in the Agency's survey programs, which would not otherwise have been carried out during the provision of methodology services to those survey programs. They also include tasks that provided client support in the application of past successful developments in order to promote the utilization of the results of research and development work.

    Release date: 2019-11-15

  • Journals and periodicals: 92F0138M
    Description:

    The Geography working paper series is intended to stimulate discussion on a variety of topics covering conceptual, methodological or technical work to support the development and dissemination of the division's data, products and services. Readers of the series are encouraged to contact the Geography Division with comments and suggestions.

    Release date: 2019-11-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 21-004-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Each issue contains a short article highlighting statistical insights on themes relating to agriculture, food and rural issues.

    Release date: 2019-11-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-222-X
    Description:

    Labour Statistics at a Glance features short analytical articles on specific topics of interest related to Canada's labour market. The studies examine recent or historical trends using data produced by the Labour Statistics Division, i.e., the Labour Force Survey, the Survey of Employment Payrolls and Hours, the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey, the Employment Insurance Coverage Survey and the Employment Insurance Statistics Program.

    Release date: 2019-10-28
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