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COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (34) (0 to 10 of 34 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19890042284
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    One in twelve paid workers in 1986 earned the minimum wage or less. A portrait of low-wage earners and a brief look at the origins of minimum wage legislation and differences by jurisdiction.

    Release date: 1989-12-20

  • 2. Moonlighters Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X19890042285
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In the average week of 1988, over a half a million people worked at two or more jobs. This study shows that some groups of workers - the young, the self-employed - are especially disposed to moonlighting. Family circumstances, hours of work and earnings between single and multiple jobholders are examined.

    Release date: 1989-12-20

  • 3. Disabled workers Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X19890042286
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    There were nearly 400,000 disabled workers in Canada in 1986 - less than a third of working age Canadians with a disability. What are the characteristics of disabled workers? This study compares disabled workers with the non-disabled in the work force and with disabled persons outside of the work force.

    Release date: 1989-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19890042287
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Immigrant workers are over-represented in "product fabricating" occupations, which include, for example, garment workers and mechanics. This profile of immigrants in fabricating jobs looks at age, education, period of immigration and knowledge of English or French. It also compared the employment income of immigrant and non-immigrant workers in product fabricating occupations.

    Release date: 1989-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19890042288
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Unemployment estimates from the Labour Force Survey, source of the official unemployment rate, are quite different from counts of the number of Unemployment Insurance beneficiaries. This piece reviews the conceptual differences between the two data sources and quantifies many of the factors that create the discrepancies.

    Release date: 1989-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X198900214562
    Description:

    This paper presents a technique for developing appropriate confidence intervals around postcensal population estimates using a modification of the ratio-correlation method termed the rank-order procedure. It is shown that the Wilcoxon test can be used to decide if a given ratio-correlation model is stable over time. If stability is indicated, then the confidence intervals associated with the data used in model construction are appropriate for postcensal estimates. If stability is not indicated, the confidence intervals associated with the data used in model construction are not appropriate, and, moreover, likely to overstate the precision of postcensal estimates. Given instability, it is shown that confidence intervals appropriate for postcensal estimates can be derived using the rank-order procedure. An empirical example is provided using county population estimates for Washington state.

    Release date: 1989-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X198900214563
    Description:

    This paper examines the adequacy of estimates of emigrants from Canada and interprovincial migration data from the Family Allowance files and Revenue Canada tax files. The application of these data files in estimating total population for Canada, provinces and territories, was evaluated with reference to the 1986 Census counts. It was found that these two administrative files provided consistent and reasonably accurate series of data on emigration and interprovincial migration from 1981 to 1986. Consequently, the population estimates were fairly accurate. The estimate of emigrants derived from the Family Allowance file could be improved by using the ratio of adult to child emigrant rates computed from Employment and Immigration Canada’s immigration file.

    Release date: 1989-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X198900214564
    Description:

    It is sometimes required that a probabilities proportional to size without replacement (PPSWOR) sample of first stage units (psu’s) in a multistage population survey design be updated to take account of new size measures that have become available for the whole population of such units. However, because of a considerable investment in within-psu mapping, segmentation, listing, enumerator recruitment, etc., we would like to retain the same sample psu’s if possible, consistent with the requirement that selection probabilities may now be regarded as being proportional to the new size measures. The method described in this article differs from methods already described in the literature in that it is valid for any sample size and does not require enumeration of all possible samples. Further, it does not require that the old and the new sampling methods be the same and hence it provides a convenient way not only of updating size measures but also of switching to a new sampling method.

    Release date: 1989-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X198900214565
    Description:

    Empirical Bayes techniques are applied to the problem of “small area” estimation of proportions. Such methods have been previously used to advantage in a variety of situations, as described, for example, by Morris (1983). The basic idea here consists of incorporating random effects and nested random effects into models which reflect the complex structure of a multi-stage sample design, as was originally proposed by Dempster and Tomberlin (1980). Estimates of proportions can be obtained, together with associated estimates of uncertainty. These techniques are applied to simulated data in a Monte Carlo study which compares several available techniques for small area estimation.

    Release date: 1989-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X198900214566
    Description:

    A randomized response model for sampling from dichotomous populations is developed in this paper. The model permits the use of continuous randomization and multiple trials per respondent. The special case of randomization with normal distributions is considered, and a computer simulation of such a sampling procedure is presented as an initial exploration into the effects such a scheme has on the amount of information in the sample. A portable electronic device is discussed which would implement the presented model. The results of a study taken, using the electronic randomizing device, is presented. The results show that randomized response sampling is a superior technique to direct questioning for at least some sensitive questions.

    Release date: 1989-12-15
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Articles and reports (34)

Articles and reports (34) (0 to 10 of 34 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19890042284
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    One in twelve paid workers in 1986 earned the minimum wage or less. A portrait of low-wage earners and a brief look at the origins of minimum wage legislation and differences by jurisdiction.

    Release date: 1989-12-20

  • 2. Moonlighters Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X19890042285
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In the average week of 1988, over a half a million people worked at two or more jobs. This study shows that some groups of workers - the young, the self-employed - are especially disposed to moonlighting. Family circumstances, hours of work and earnings between single and multiple jobholders are examined.

    Release date: 1989-12-20

  • 3. Disabled workers Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X19890042286
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    There were nearly 400,000 disabled workers in Canada in 1986 - less than a third of working age Canadians with a disability. What are the characteristics of disabled workers? This study compares disabled workers with the non-disabled in the work force and with disabled persons outside of the work force.

    Release date: 1989-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19890042287
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Immigrant workers are over-represented in "product fabricating" occupations, which include, for example, garment workers and mechanics. This profile of immigrants in fabricating jobs looks at age, education, period of immigration and knowledge of English or French. It also compared the employment income of immigrant and non-immigrant workers in product fabricating occupations.

    Release date: 1989-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19890042288
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Unemployment estimates from the Labour Force Survey, source of the official unemployment rate, are quite different from counts of the number of Unemployment Insurance beneficiaries. This piece reviews the conceptual differences between the two data sources and quantifies many of the factors that create the discrepancies.

    Release date: 1989-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X198900214562
    Description:

    This paper presents a technique for developing appropriate confidence intervals around postcensal population estimates using a modification of the ratio-correlation method termed the rank-order procedure. It is shown that the Wilcoxon test can be used to decide if a given ratio-correlation model is stable over time. If stability is indicated, then the confidence intervals associated with the data used in model construction are appropriate for postcensal estimates. If stability is not indicated, the confidence intervals associated with the data used in model construction are not appropriate, and, moreover, likely to overstate the precision of postcensal estimates. Given instability, it is shown that confidence intervals appropriate for postcensal estimates can be derived using the rank-order procedure. An empirical example is provided using county population estimates for Washington state.

    Release date: 1989-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X198900214563
    Description:

    This paper examines the adequacy of estimates of emigrants from Canada and interprovincial migration data from the Family Allowance files and Revenue Canada tax files. The application of these data files in estimating total population for Canada, provinces and territories, was evaluated with reference to the 1986 Census counts. It was found that these two administrative files provided consistent and reasonably accurate series of data on emigration and interprovincial migration from 1981 to 1986. Consequently, the population estimates were fairly accurate. The estimate of emigrants derived from the Family Allowance file could be improved by using the ratio of adult to child emigrant rates computed from Employment and Immigration Canada’s immigration file.

    Release date: 1989-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X198900214564
    Description:

    It is sometimes required that a probabilities proportional to size without replacement (PPSWOR) sample of first stage units (psu’s) in a multistage population survey design be updated to take account of new size measures that have become available for the whole population of such units. However, because of a considerable investment in within-psu mapping, segmentation, listing, enumerator recruitment, etc., we would like to retain the same sample psu’s if possible, consistent with the requirement that selection probabilities may now be regarded as being proportional to the new size measures. The method described in this article differs from methods already described in the literature in that it is valid for any sample size and does not require enumeration of all possible samples. Further, it does not require that the old and the new sampling methods be the same and hence it provides a convenient way not only of updating size measures but also of switching to a new sampling method.

    Release date: 1989-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X198900214565
    Description:

    Empirical Bayes techniques are applied to the problem of “small area” estimation of proportions. Such methods have been previously used to advantage in a variety of situations, as described, for example, by Morris (1983). The basic idea here consists of incorporating random effects and nested random effects into models which reflect the complex structure of a multi-stage sample design, as was originally proposed by Dempster and Tomberlin (1980). Estimates of proportions can be obtained, together with associated estimates of uncertainty. These techniques are applied to simulated data in a Monte Carlo study which compares several available techniques for small area estimation.

    Release date: 1989-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X198900214566
    Description:

    A randomized response model for sampling from dichotomous populations is developed in this paper. The model permits the use of continuous randomization and multiple trials per respondent. The special case of randomization with normal distributions is considered, and a computer simulation of such a sampling procedure is presented as an initial exploration into the effects such a scheme has on the amount of information in the sample. A portable electronic device is discussed which would implement the presented model. The results of a study taken, using the electronic randomizing device, is presented. The results show that randomized response sampling is a superior technique to direct questioning for at least some sensitive questions.

    Release date: 1989-12-15
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