Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (19) (0 to 10 of 19 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202018122563
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2020-06-29

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202014622643
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2020-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2020001
    Description:

    This study examines the relationship between work, learning, and work-integrated learning for the 2012 Canadian population that graduated between 2012 and 2016 using new data from the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults.

    Release date: 2020-05-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-648-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The documents in this collection are based on data from the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults, a survey that examines a variety of topics on the well-being of Canadians and measures the effect of changes in certain areas on people's lives. The survey covers several topics, such as jobs, health, adult education and training, income and earnings, as well as the family dynamic. Reports on the survey content, concepts, methodology and data quality are also available.

    Release date: 2020-05-25

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202007722663
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2020-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2020002
    Description:

    Administrative data sets have become increasingly popular sources of information to study mobility across generations. However, the inclusion of parent-child pairs depends on the primary purpose for which the data was collected. In the case of tax records, both parents and children must have worked and filed their taxes, and the children's labour market entry must have happened before they left the parental home. This paper documents selection in samples of parent-child pairs constructed from personal income tax records from Canada, and discusses implications for intergenerational research. It takes advantage of the fact that Statistics Canada's Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) includes both survey and administrative data to inform the nature and severity of the resulting sample selection. Results show that respondents who were successfully linked to their parents are more educated, and are more likely to have grown up in better educated, nuclear families. However, correcting for sample selection suggests that there is no bias in unadjusted estimates.

    Release date: 2020-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2020003
    Description:

    This study investigates the suitability of Canada's Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) for research on intergenerational income mobility. The LISA combines survey data, collected biennially since 2012, and the personal income tax records of both respondents and their past and present family members. In comparison, existing work on intergenerational mobility in Canada has often used the Intergenerational Income Database (IID), a purely administrative dataset based on the universe of tax filers. The IID's size has allowed researchers to describe the experience of mobility of narrowly defined geographic units and cohorts. However, its potential to investigate the mechanisms underlying these patterns is limited, given the small set of variables it informs. As such, the LISA is a promising candidate to further our understanding of the drivers of mobility. This study reproduces the analysis from four key papers that have documented the intergenerational transmission of income in Canada using the IID. Despite having a much smaller sample size and a different approach to the establishment of parent-child links, it finds that the LISA produces results that are consistent with the existing literature. This study also explores the sensitivity of rank-rank estimates to the choice of different specification and present results that will guide the methodological choices to be made by users of the LISA intergenerational family files in combination with LISA variables from the survey data.

    Release date: 2020-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154980
    Description:

    This study explores the association between job flexibility and job satisfaction, for men and women aged 18 to 64, using data from the 2014 Longitudinal and International Study of Adults. Control over four aspects of job flexibility are considered: the order of work, how to do the work, the speed of work, and the hours of work.

    Release date: 2018-12-04

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201833819543
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2018-12-04

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201820519084
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2018-07-24
Stats in brief (8)

Stats in brief (8) ((8 results))

Articles and reports (10)

Articles and reports (10) ((10 results))

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2020001
    Description:

    This study examines the relationship between work, learning, and work-integrated learning for the 2012 Canadian population that graduated between 2012 and 2016 using new data from the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults.

    Release date: 2020-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2020002
    Description:

    Administrative data sets have become increasingly popular sources of information to study mobility across generations. However, the inclusion of parent-child pairs depends on the primary purpose for which the data was collected. In the case of tax records, both parents and children must have worked and filed their taxes, and the children's labour market entry must have happened before they left the parental home. This paper documents selection in samples of parent-child pairs constructed from personal income tax records from Canada, and discusses implications for intergenerational research. It takes advantage of the fact that Statistics Canada's Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) includes both survey and administrative data to inform the nature and severity of the resulting sample selection. Results show that respondents who were successfully linked to their parents are more educated, and are more likely to have grown up in better educated, nuclear families. However, correcting for sample selection suggests that there is no bias in unadjusted estimates.

    Release date: 2020-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2020003
    Description:

    This study investigates the suitability of Canada's Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) for research on intergenerational income mobility. The LISA combines survey data, collected biennially since 2012, and the personal income tax records of both respondents and their past and present family members. In comparison, existing work on intergenerational mobility in Canada has often used the Intergenerational Income Database (IID), a purely administrative dataset based on the universe of tax filers. The IID's size has allowed researchers to describe the experience of mobility of narrowly defined geographic units and cohorts. However, its potential to investigate the mechanisms underlying these patterns is limited, given the small set of variables it informs. As such, the LISA is a promising candidate to further our understanding of the drivers of mobility. This study reproduces the analysis from four key papers that have documented the intergenerational transmission of income in Canada using the IID. Despite having a much smaller sample size and a different approach to the establishment of parent-child links, it finds that the LISA produces results that are consistent with the existing literature. This study also explores the sensitivity of rank-rank estimates to the choice of different specification and present results that will guide the methodological choices to be made by users of the LISA intergenerational family files in combination with LISA variables from the survey data.

    Release date: 2020-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154980
    Description:

    This study explores the association between job flexibility and job satisfaction, for men and women aged 18 to 64, using data from the 2014 Longitudinal and International Study of Adults. Control over four aspects of job flexibility are considered: the order of work, how to do the work, the speed of work, and the hours of work.

    Release date: 2018-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2018001
    Description:

    This study examines the association between self-reported health and spouse-pair labour-market income using data from the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults. To explore the channels through which health associates with individual labour-market income, the association between health and spouse-pair income is further broken down into the association between health and the probability of working, hours worked, and hourly wage, both for an individual’s health and their spouse’s health.

    Release date: 2018-07-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154975
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) to provide information on individuals looking for work even if they are already employed. The study examines the reasons why workers want to look for a new job. The paper also explores the links between looking for a job while employed, the characteristics of workers seeking a new job and their level of job satisfaction.

    Release date: 2018-07-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700154854
    Description:

    This study uses data from the 2014 Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) in order to examine the relationship between low income and characteristics of people aged 25 to 64 with a disability, including disability type, severity class, age of onset of disability, family composition, and other risk factors associated with low income. It also examines the composition of the low-income population in relation to disability, and provides information on the relationship between employment and low income for this population.

    Release date: 2017-08-11

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2016001
    Description:

    Linkages between survey and administrative data are an increasingly common practice, due in part to the reduced burden to respondents, and to the data that can be obtained at a relatively low cost. Historical linkage, or the linkage of administrative data from previous years to the year of the survey, compounds these benefits by providing additional years of data. This paper examines the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA), which was linked to historical tax data on personal income tax returns (T1) and those collected from employers’ files (T4), among others not mentioned in this paper. It presents trends in historical linkage rates, compares the coherence of administrative data between the T1 and T4, presents the ability to use the data to create balanced panels, and uses the T1 data to produce age-earnings profiles by sex. The results show that the historical linkage rate is high (over 90% in most cases) and stable over time for respondents who are likely to file a tax return, and that the T1 and T4 administrative sources show similar earnings. Moreover, long balanced panels of up to 30 years in length (at the time of writing) can be created using LISA administrative linkage data.

    Release date: 2016-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400114120
    Description:

    This study examines the characteristics of Canadian workers aged 25 to 54 who are covered by defined benefit (DB) registered pension plans (RPPs) as well as those covered by defined contribution RPPs or hybrid plans. It does so by taking advantage of new data from the new Longitudinal and International Survey of Adults (LISA), first conducted in 2012.

    Release date: 2014-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2013001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In the fall of 2008, Statistics Canada, in partnership with Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Canadian academic community, put into the field the Canadian Household Panel Survey Pilot (CHPS-Pilot). This paper describes the background of the project, the steps taken in the development of the pilot survey, and the results of a series of explorations of the data collected.

    Release date: 2013-01-24
Journals and periodicals (1)

Journals and periodicals (1) ((1 result))

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-648-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The documents in this collection are based on data from the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults, a survey that examines a variety of topics on the well-being of Canadians and measures the effect of changes in certain areas on people's lives. The survey covers several topics, such as jobs, health, adult education and training, income and earnings, as well as the family dynamic. Reports on the survey content, concepts, methodology and data quality are also available.

    Release date: 2020-05-25
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