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All (20) (0 to 10 of 20 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2024002
    Description: Immigrant-owned businesses were more likely to be affected by the COVID-19 pandemic than other businesses, as they were more concentrated in industries requiring in-person contact and were smaller in scale. To support businesses affected by the pandemic, the Government of Canada launched various COVID-19 liquidity support programs, including the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS), the Canada Emergency Commercial Rent Assistance (CECRA), the Canada Emergency Rent Subsidy (CERS) and the Canada Emergency Business Account (CEBA). These programs were designed to help affected businesses by partially covering their main expenses, such as wages, rent and property expenses.
    Release date: 2024-03-06

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202301000002
    Description: To alleviate the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on businesses, the Government of Canada launched various liquidity support programs. This study examines the use of four emergency government support programs—the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS), the Canada Emergency Commercial Rent Assistance (CECRA), the Canada Emergency Rent Subsidy (CERS) and the Canada Emergency Business Account (CEBA)—by the child care businesses that qualified for them.
    Release date: 2023-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200200006
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic had a major impact on businesses in 2020. In response, the Government of Canada introduced measures to support both individuals and businesses through the pandemic. The largest program for businesses was the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS). This paper presents firm-level evidence on the relationship between the usage of the CEWS programs and the survival and growth of businesses controlling for the pre-pandemic characteristics of businesses and where possible, their use of two other important programs, the Canada Emergency Business Account and the Canada Emergency Commercial Rental Assistance programs.

    Release date: 2022-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100600006
    Description:

    The purpose of this article is to provide information on how the Government of Canada’s Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS) program has been used by employer businesses, how the usage differs by industry and business size, and characteristics of businesses who used the CEWS. This information can help Canadians better understand the impact of the COVID-19 health crisis on Canadian businesses and how businesses made use of government’s financial supports.

    Release date: 2021-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100200001
    Description:

    While Canada has embraced digital technologies rapidly and broadly over the past two decades, there is no doubt that the adoption of digital technologies has been amplified and accelerated as a result of the COVID-19 crisis. This article compares the economic performance of sectors where digital inputs have been used more intensively in the production process (digitally-intensive sectors) to that of remaining sectors (non digitally-intensive sectors).

    Release date: 2021-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100200003
    Description:

    Over the past two decades, Canadians have embraced digital technologies at an unprecedented pace and breadth. The objective of this study is to develop statistical indexes to measure the intensity of digitalization in Canadian industries. Because of the ubiquitous presence of digitalization and businesses’ and individuals’ increasing reliance on digital products and services, it is essential to measure the digitalization in the Canadian economy to better understand its impact so that governments, businesses and other stakeholders can make informed decisions.

    Release date: 2021-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020023
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article presents a range of estimates, using different scenarios, of the impact on the Canadian economy of the travel restrictions imposed to contain the spread of COVID-19. These scenarios represent several possibilities based on when travel restrictions are lifted and the speed of recovery.

    Release date: 2020-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020007
    Description:

    The dispersion of earnings among workers may come from multiple sources. It may reflect differences in workers’ characteristics, such as education and experience. It may also be because workers are employed at different firms that pay differently. Recent studies from other countries have found that firms play an important role in explaining earnings disparities among workers, often through the link between productivity and pay. However, there has been no Canadian evidence on the link between the earnings dispersion and firm differences because of a lack of matched employer–employee data. This paper presents developments in the dispersion of individuals’ earnings in Canada and examines the potential of firm characteristics to account for this dispersion and changes in this dispersion in the post-2000 period using the Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database.

    Release date: 2020-02-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019025
    Description:

    This study identifies gig workers based on characteristics of their work arrangements and how these are reported in tax data. It introduces a definition of gig work specific to the way work arrangements are reported in the Canadian tax system and estimates the size of the gig economy in Canada using administrative data. The share of gig workers among all workers rose from 5.5% in 2005 to 8.2% in 2016. Some of this increase coincided with the introduction and proliferation of online platforms. The analysis highlights gender differences in the trends and characteristics of gig workers. By linking administrative data to 2016 Census microdata, this study also examines educational and occupational differences in the prevalence of gig workers.

    Release date: 2019-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019014
    Description:

    Canada has a relatively large foreign-born population, and the country’s economic prosperity depends on international trade. This paper examines how these two characteristics are linked. Specifically, it investigates the effect of immigrant business ownership on international trade in Canada.

    Understanding the impact of immigrants on international trade is particularly important for Canada, as it is a small open economy with a relatively large immigrant population. This paper empirically investigates the effect of immigrant business ownership on international trade in Canada using a newly developed firm-level database with detailed business ownership and trade information. The new data make it possible to better distinguish between the effect immigrants have on reducing information costs and on product demand, and to assess the impact of immigrant business ownership on the extensive and intensive margins of international trade.

    Release date: 2019-05-13
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Articles and reports (20)

Articles and reports (20) (0 to 10 of 20 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2024002
    Description: Immigrant-owned businesses were more likely to be affected by the COVID-19 pandemic than other businesses, as they were more concentrated in industries requiring in-person contact and were smaller in scale. To support businesses affected by the pandemic, the Government of Canada launched various COVID-19 liquidity support programs, including the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS), the Canada Emergency Commercial Rent Assistance (CECRA), the Canada Emergency Rent Subsidy (CERS) and the Canada Emergency Business Account (CEBA). These programs were designed to help affected businesses by partially covering their main expenses, such as wages, rent and property expenses.
    Release date: 2024-03-06

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202301000002
    Description: To alleviate the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on businesses, the Government of Canada launched various liquidity support programs. This study examines the use of four emergency government support programs—the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS), the Canada Emergency Commercial Rent Assistance (CECRA), the Canada Emergency Rent Subsidy (CERS) and the Canada Emergency Business Account (CEBA)—by the child care businesses that qualified for them.
    Release date: 2023-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200200006
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic had a major impact on businesses in 2020. In response, the Government of Canada introduced measures to support both individuals and businesses through the pandemic. The largest program for businesses was the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS). This paper presents firm-level evidence on the relationship between the usage of the CEWS programs and the survival and growth of businesses controlling for the pre-pandemic characteristics of businesses and where possible, their use of two other important programs, the Canada Emergency Business Account and the Canada Emergency Commercial Rental Assistance programs.

    Release date: 2022-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100600006
    Description:

    The purpose of this article is to provide information on how the Government of Canada’s Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS) program has been used by employer businesses, how the usage differs by industry and business size, and characteristics of businesses who used the CEWS. This information can help Canadians better understand the impact of the COVID-19 health crisis on Canadian businesses and how businesses made use of government’s financial supports.

    Release date: 2021-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100200001
    Description:

    While Canada has embraced digital technologies rapidly and broadly over the past two decades, there is no doubt that the adoption of digital technologies has been amplified and accelerated as a result of the COVID-19 crisis. This article compares the economic performance of sectors where digital inputs have been used more intensively in the production process (digitally-intensive sectors) to that of remaining sectors (non digitally-intensive sectors).

    Release date: 2021-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100200003
    Description:

    Over the past two decades, Canadians have embraced digital technologies at an unprecedented pace and breadth. The objective of this study is to develop statistical indexes to measure the intensity of digitalization in Canadian industries. Because of the ubiquitous presence of digitalization and businesses’ and individuals’ increasing reliance on digital products and services, it is essential to measure the digitalization in the Canadian economy to better understand its impact so that governments, businesses and other stakeholders can make informed decisions.

    Release date: 2021-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020023
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article presents a range of estimates, using different scenarios, of the impact on the Canadian economy of the travel restrictions imposed to contain the spread of COVID-19. These scenarios represent several possibilities based on when travel restrictions are lifted and the speed of recovery.

    Release date: 2020-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020007
    Description:

    The dispersion of earnings among workers may come from multiple sources. It may reflect differences in workers’ characteristics, such as education and experience. It may also be because workers are employed at different firms that pay differently. Recent studies from other countries have found that firms play an important role in explaining earnings disparities among workers, often through the link between productivity and pay. However, there has been no Canadian evidence on the link between the earnings dispersion and firm differences because of a lack of matched employer–employee data. This paper presents developments in the dispersion of individuals’ earnings in Canada and examines the potential of firm characteristics to account for this dispersion and changes in this dispersion in the post-2000 period using the Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database.

    Release date: 2020-02-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019025
    Description:

    This study identifies gig workers based on characteristics of their work arrangements and how these are reported in tax data. It introduces a definition of gig work specific to the way work arrangements are reported in the Canadian tax system and estimates the size of the gig economy in Canada using administrative data. The share of gig workers among all workers rose from 5.5% in 2005 to 8.2% in 2016. Some of this increase coincided with the introduction and proliferation of online platforms. The analysis highlights gender differences in the trends and characteristics of gig workers. By linking administrative data to 2016 Census microdata, this study also examines educational and occupational differences in the prevalence of gig workers.

    Release date: 2019-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019014
    Description:

    Canada has a relatively large foreign-born population, and the country’s economic prosperity depends on international trade. This paper examines how these two characteristics are linked. Specifically, it investigates the effect of immigrant business ownership on international trade in Canada.

    Understanding the impact of immigrants on international trade is particularly important for Canada, as it is a small open economy with a relatively large immigrant population. This paper empirically investigates the effect of immigrant business ownership on international trade in Canada using a newly developed firm-level database with detailed business ownership and trade information. The new data make it possible to better distinguish between the effect immigrants have on reducing information costs and on product demand, and to assess the impact of immigrant business ownership on the extensive and intensive margins of international trade.

    Release date: 2019-05-13
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