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  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202300100003
    Description: Quality of life and well-being research often involves survey content that is subjective in nature, for example questions pertaining to life satisfaction. Two phenomena impacting responses to self-reported life satisfaction are studied across a range of social surveys: the framing effect, where a respondent’s answer is influenced by the theme of the survey or its content; and the mode effect, where a respondent’s answer is influenced by the method in which survey data is collected (with an interviewer, through an online collection portal, etc.). The objective of this paper is to document the effect that survey collection and survey content have on Canadians’ self-reported satisfaction with their lives. The impact of these effects on life satisfaction responses is measured across three Statistics Canada survey series: the General Social Survey, the Canadian Community Health Survey, and the Canadian Social Survey.
    Release date: 2023-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200400004
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic and responses to it have contributed to, and probably accelerated, the roles that the internet and digital technologies play in our lives, thrusting large numbers of people and organizations online. But internet and digital skills vary and not everyone had the same capacity to rapidly shift activities of daily life online. The objective of this paper is to document the changes in the online activities and skills reported by Canadians prior to, and during, the COVID-19 pandemic. Data from 2018 and 2020 Canadian Internet Use Surveys are used to categorize Canadians into one of five internet user groups, ranging from non-users to advanced users.

    Release date: 2022-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2021008
    Description:

    A robust Internet typology is essential for monitoring how individuals are responding to the digital transformation and for assessing the divide between digital ‘haves’ and ‘have nots.’ Individuals’ capacities to use the Internet and digital technologies are an important aspect of this digital divide. Using data from the 2018 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS), this study presents an Internet-use typology that is based on the range and complexity of online activities and digital skills that Canadians report they perform. Five Internet-user groups are identified.

    Release date: 2021-11-09
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Articles and reports (3)

Articles and reports (3) ((3 results))

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202300100003
    Description: Quality of life and well-being research often involves survey content that is subjective in nature, for example questions pertaining to life satisfaction. Two phenomena impacting responses to self-reported life satisfaction are studied across a range of social surveys: the framing effect, where a respondent’s answer is influenced by the theme of the survey or its content; and the mode effect, where a respondent’s answer is influenced by the method in which survey data is collected (with an interviewer, through an online collection portal, etc.). The objective of this paper is to document the effect that survey collection and survey content have on Canadians’ self-reported satisfaction with their lives. The impact of these effects on life satisfaction responses is measured across three Statistics Canada survey series: the General Social Survey, the Canadian Community Health Survey, and the Canadian Social Survey.
    Release date: 2023-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200400004
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic and responses to it have contributed to, and probably accelerated, the roles that the internet and digital technologies play in our lives, thrusting large numbers of people and organizations online. But internet and digital skills vary and not everyone had the same capacity to rapidly shift activities of daily life online. The objective of this paper is to document the changes in the online activities and skills reported by Canadians prior to, and during, the COVID-19 pandemic. Data from 2018 and 2020 Canadian Internet Use Surveys are used to categorize Canadians into one of five internet user groups, ranging from non-users to advanced users.

    Release date: 2022-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2021008
    Description:

    A robust Internet typology is essential for monitoring how individuals are responding to the digital transformation and for assessing the divide between digital ‘haves’ and ‘have nots.’ Individuals’ capacities to use the Internet and digital technologies are an important aspect of this digital divide. Using data from the 2018 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS), this study presents an Internet-use typology that is based on the range and complexity of online activities and digital skills that Canadians report they perform. Five Internet-user groups are identified.

    Release date: 2021-11-09
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