Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (92)

All (92) (0 to 10 of 92 results)

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200600001
    Description:

    This article summarizes a new report, prepared by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada and Statistics Canada, that updates empirical analysis intended to support the development of the selection criteria for economic immigrants in Canada. The follow-up study asks which selection factors best predict earnings of economic principal applicants. The analysis focuses on factors that are currently used in the selection of economic immigrants and that are available in the Longitudinal Immigration Database. These factors, all measured at landing, are: age, education, official language ability, pre-landing Canadian work experience, pre-landing Canadian study experience, whether the applicant has a spouse, and the sociodemographic characteristics of the spouse.

    Release date: 2022-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200200003
    Description:

    The labour market outcomes of recently arrived immigrants are often more negatively affected during recessions than those of the Canadian-born. Entering the labour market during a recession may also result in “scarring” effects for both immigrants and Canadian-born workers—the notion that the effects of entering a labour market during a period of high unemployment persists years into the future. However, the severity and characteristics of recessions vary significantly and may affect immigrants’ outcomes differently. This paper compares immigrants’ outcomes during the past three recessions.

    Release date: 2022-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200100002
    Description:

    Attention surrounding differences in the pathways to permanent residency for lower- and higher-skilled temporary foreign workers has increased, particularly as the COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the contribution of lower-skilled temporary foreign workers in essential industrial sectors. This article examines the skill distribution of temporary foreign workers and their transition to permanent residency by skill level.

    Release date: 2022-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202101100003
    Description:

    Since the 1990s, Canadian immigration policy has emphasized human capital, particularly education and language proficiency, in the selection of economic immigrants. While immigration and the domestic educational system continuously increase the supply of a university-educated labour force, there has been concern that skilled trades are an often-overlooked career option for many secondary school graduates, and that this may lead to labour shortages in skilled trades. This article examines trends in the number of economic immigrant principal applicants who intended to work in skilled trades, their sociodemographic characteristics, and their employment and earnings outcomes. Also, comparisons are made with other economic immigrant principal applicants.

    Release date: 2021-11-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100900001
    Description:

    This paper highlights the main findings of the Immigrant Entrepreneurs research program initiated by the Research and Evaluation Branch of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada and Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2021-09-22

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100900003
    Description:

    Entrepreneurship and businesses ownership are important aspects of the economic contribution of immigrants. Much is known regarding the high self-employment rates and other characteristics of immigrant entrepreneurs. However, very little is known about the based wage disparity, including gender-related biases in career advancement. Using new content developed in the 2016 General Social Survey (GSS Cycle 30): Canadians at Work and Home, this study investigates the possible existence and magnitude of gender-related biases in career advancement that may prevent women from advancing in their careers.

    Release date: 2021-09-22

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100400004
    Description:

    This study examines whether the gaps in the employment rates and weekly earnings between immigrants and Canadian-born individuals increased or decreased over the last two decades. Earlier studies have well documented the expanding earnings gap between new immigrant workers and their Canadian-born counterparts during the 1980s and 1990s. However, significant policy changes in immigration selection and settlement have been introduced since the early 2000s, and the employment rate and entry earnings among new immigrants have been improving in recent years. Little research has been undertaken to examine whether the earnings gap between new immigrant and Canadian-born workers has recently started to close.

    Release date: 2021-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020016
    Description:

    In both Canada and the United States, immigrants constitute a disproportionately large share of the supply of university-educated labour trained in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. This article examines the Canada–U.S. differences in the occupational skill utilization and earnings of STEM-educated immigrant workers. Using data from the 2016 Census for Canada and the combined 2015 to 2017 American Community Survey, this analysis focuses on immigrants with a university degree in a STEM field who were aged 25 to 64 and arrived as adults.

    Release date: 2020-09-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020014
    Description:

    Previous studies on the impact of immigration on productivity in developed countries remain inconclusive, and most analyses are abstracted from firms where production actually takes place. This study examines the empirical relationship between immigration and firm-level productivity in Canada. It uses a data file derived from linking the Canadian Employer-Employee Dynamics Database that tracks firms over time with the Longitudinal Immigration Data file (IMDB) that includes sociodemographic characteristics at landing for immigrants who arrived in Canada after 1980.

    Release date: 2020-09-14

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100070
    Description:

    During the widespread lockdown of economic activities in March and April 2020, the Canadian labour market lost 3 million jobs. From May to July, as many businesses gradually resumed their operations, 1.7 million jobs were recovered. While studies in the United States and Europe suggest that immigrants are often more severely affected by economic downturns than the native born, little is known about whether immigrants and the Canadian born fared differently in the employment disruption induced by the COVID-19 pandemic and, if so, how such differences are related to their socio-demographic and job characteristics. This paper fills this gap by comparing immigrants and the Canadian-born population in their transitions out of employment in the months of heavy contraction and into employment during the months of partial recovery.

    Release date: 2020-08-20
Stats in brief (1)

Stats in brief (1) ((1 result))

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100070
    Description:

    During the widespread lockdown of economic activities in March and April 2020, the Canadian labour market lost 3 million jobs. From May to July, as many businesses gradually resumed their operations, 1.7 million jobs were recovered. While studies in the United States and Europe suggest that immigrants are often more severely affected by economic downturns than the native born, little is known about whether immigrants and the Canadian born fared differently in the employment disruption induced by the COVID-19 pandemic and, if so, how such differences are related to their socio-demographic and job characteristics. This paper fills this gap by comparing immigrants and the Canadian-born population in their transitions out of employment in the months of heavy contraction and into employment during the months of partial recovery.

    Release date: 2020-08-20
Articles and reports (91)

Articles and reports (91) (0 to 10 of 91 results)

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200600001
    Description:

    This article summarizes a new report, prepared by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada and Statistics Canada, that updates empirical analysis intended to support the development of the selection criteria for economic immigrants in Canada. The follow-up study asks which selection factors best predict earnings of economic principal applicants. The analysis focuses on factors that are currently used in the selection of economic immigrants and that are available in the Longitudinal Immigration Database. These factors, all measured at landing, are: age, education, official language ability, pre-landing Canadian work experience, pre-landing Canadian study experience, whether the applicant has a spouse, and the sociodemographic characteristics of the spouse.

    Release date: 2022-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200200003
    Description:

    The labour market outcomes of recently arrived immigrants are often more negatively affected during recessions than those of the Canadian-born. Entering the labour market during a recession may also result in “scarring” effects for both immigrants and Canadian-born workers—the notion that the effects of entering a labour market during a period of high unemployment persists years into the future. However, the severity and characteristics of recessions vary significantly and may affect immigrants’ outcomes differently. This paper compares immigrants’ outcomes during the past three recessions.

    Release date: 2022-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200100002
    Description:

    Attention surrounding differences in the pathways to permanent residency for lower- and higher-skilled temporary foreign workers has increased, particularly as the COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the contribution of lower-skilled temporary foreign workers in essential industrial sectors. This article examines the skill distribution of temporary foreign workers and their transition to permanent residency by skill level.

    Release date: 2022-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202101100003
    Description:

    Since the 1990s, Canadian immigration policy has emphasized human capital, particularly education and language proficiency, in the selection of economic immigrants. While immigration and the domestic educational system continuously increase the supply of a university-educated labour force, there has been concern that skilled trades are an often-overlooked career option for many secondary school graduates, and that this may lead to labour shortages in skilled trades. This article examines trends in the number of economic immigrant principal applicants who intended to work in skilled trades, their sociodemographic characteristics, and their employment and earnings outcomes. Also, comparisons are made with other economic immigrant principal applicants.

    Release date: 2021-11-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100900001
    Description:

    This paper highlights the main findings of the Immigrant Entrepreneurs research program initiated by the Research and Evaluation Branch of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada and Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2021-09-22

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100900003
    Description:

    Entrepreneurship and businesses ownership are important aspects of the economic contribution of immigrants. Much is known regarding the high self-employment rates and other characteristics of immigrant entrepreneurs. However, very little is known about the based wage disparity, including gender-related biases in career advancement. Using new content developed in the 2016 General Social Survey (GSS Cycle 30): Canadians at Work and Home, this study investigates the possible existence and magnitude of gender-related biases in career advancement that may prevent women from advancing in their careers.

    Release date: 2021-09-22

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100400004
    Description:

    This study examines whether the gaps in the employment rates and weekly earnings between immigrants and Canadian-born individuals increased or decreased over the last two decades. Earlier studies have well documented the expanding earnings gap between new immigrant workers and their Canadian-born counterparts during the 1980s and 1990s. However, significant policy changes in immigration selection and settlement have been introduced since the early 2000s, and the employment rate and entry earnings among new immigrants have been improving in recent years. Little research has been undertaken to examine whether the earnings gap between new immigrant and Canadian-born workers has recently started to close.

    Release date: 2021-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020016
    Description:

    In both Canada and the United States, immigrants constitute a disproportionately large share of the supply of university-educated labour trained in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. This article examines the Canada–U.S. differences in the occupational skill utilization and earnings of STEM-educated immigrant workers. Using data from the 2016 Census for Canada and the combined 2015 to 2017 American Community Survey, this analysis focuses on immigrants with a university degree in a STEM field who were aged 25 to 64 and arrived as adults.

    Release date: 2020-09-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020014
    Description:

    Previous studies on the impact of immigration on productivity in developed countries remain inconclusive, and most analyses are abstracted from firms where production actually takes place. This study examines the empirical relationship between immigration and firm-level productivity in Canada. It uses a data file derived from linking the Canadian Employer-Employee Dynamics Database that tracks firms over time with the Longitudinal Immigration Data file (IMDB) that includes sociodemographic characteristics at landing for immigrants who arrived in Canada after 1980.

    Release date: 2020-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020015
    Description:

    This article examines the role of two-step selection in explaining differences in the short-term and medium-term outcomes of economic immigrants in four major admission programs: Federal Skilled Worker program (FSWP), Provincial Nominee Program (PNP), Quebec Skill Worker (QSWP), and Canadian Experience Class (CEC). These programs are devised to meet various national, regional and sectoral economic needs. The labour market outcomes of economic immigrants in these admission programs are of policy interest because they are often used as indicators of a program’s success. More importantly, the knowledge of which factors underlie the success of one program can help inform the improvement of other programs. It is the fourth of five articles on the two-step selection process.

    Release date: 2020-08-18
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