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All (81) (0 to 10 of 81 results)

  • Classification: 12-604-X
    Description:

    The concordance table provides a link between data tables and the survey questions from the Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy (SIBS).

    Release date: 2021-07-30

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20212084881
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2021-07-27

  • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2021020
    Description:

    This interactive dashboard allows users to explore main data released from the Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy (SIBS) for the reference periods 2015-2017 (SIBS 2017) and 2017-2019 (SIBS 2019). Data for SIBS 2019 were released mainly in three waves in 2021: April 26 (innovation), June 9 (structure et business strategies) and July 27 (global value chain ). The SIBS 2019 is a joint initiative of Statistics Canada; Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada; Global Affairs Canada; the Bank of Canada; the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency; the Institut de la statistique du Québec ; and the Ontario Ministry of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade. SIBS is the primary source of business innovation data for the Canadian economy. Between the release of the 2017 SIBS and 2019 SIBS results, the definition of what constitutes innovation changed slightly in the 4th edition of the Oslo Manual Data for the 2015-to-2017 and 2017-to-2019 reference periods are available by sector, according to the North American Industry Classification System; by enterprise size; and by economic region, according to the Standard Geographical Classification.

    Release date: 2021-07-27

  • Table: 33-10-0175-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which multinational organizations were among competitors in the main geographical market, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period.

    Release date: 2021-07-27

  • Table: 33-10-0194-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    The number of full-time equivalent (FTE) personnel employed outside Canada by businesses that are not an affiliate of a foreign parent (in the United States of America, Mexico, other Latin American and Caribbean countries, Europe, China, other Asian countries or all other countries), by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period. Estimates refer to fiscal year 2017 (end date falling after January 1, 2017 and on or before December 31, 2017).

    Release date: 2021-07-27

  • Table: 33-10-0198-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for employing personnel outside Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important, very important or not applicable, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period. Reasons for employing personnel outside Canada include: reduced labour costs, reduced costs other than labour costs, access to new markets, increased access to supply chains or regional trade networks, increased sales, proximity to important customers, access to specialized knowledge or technologies, tax or other financial incentives, improved logistics, lack of available labour in Canada and other reasons for employing personnel outside Canada. Estimates refer to fiscal year 2017 (end date falling after January 1, 2017 and on or before December 31, 2017).

    Release date: 2021-07-27

  • Table: 33-10-0199-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises that moved activities from outside Canada into Canada, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period.

    Release date: 2021-07-27

  • Table: 33-10-0201-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing production of goods activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important, very important or not applicable, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to production of goods.

    Release date: 2021-07-27

  • Table: 33-10-0202-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing distribution and logistics services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to distribution and logistics services.

    Release date: 2021-07-27

  • Table: 33-10-0203-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing call and help centre services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to call and help centre services.

    Release date: 2021-07-27
Data (29)

Data (29) (0 to 10 of 29 results)

  • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2021020
    Description:

    This interactive dashboard allows users to explore main data released from the Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy (SIBS) for the reference periods 2015-2017 (SIBS 2017) and 2017-2019 (SIBS 2019). Data for SIBS 2019 were released mainly in three waves in 2021: April 26 (innovation), June 9 (structure et business strategies) and July 27 (global value chain ). The SIBS 2019 is a joint initiative of Statistics Canada; Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada; Global Affairs Canada; the Bank of Canada; the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency; the Institut de la statistique du Québec ; and the Ontario Ministry of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade. SIBS is the primary source of business innovation data for the Canadian economy. Between the release of the 2017 SIBS and 2019 SIBS results, the definition of what constitutes innovation changed slightly in the 4th edition of the Oslo Manual Data for the 2015-to-2017 and 2017-to-2019 reference periods are available by sector, according to the North American Industry Classification System; by enterprise size; and by economic region, according to the Standard Geographical Classification.

    Release date: 2021-07-27

  • Table: 33-10-0175-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which multinational organizations were among competitors in the main geographical market, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period.

    Release date: 2021-07-27

  • Table: 33-10-0194-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    The number of full-time equivalent (FTE) personnel employed outside Canada by businesses that are not an affiliate of a foreign parent (in the United States of America, Mexico, other Latin American and Caribbean countries, Europe, China, other Asian countries or all other countries), by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period. Estimates refer to fiscal year 2017 (end date falling after January 1, 2017 and on or before December 31, 2017).

    Release date: 2021-07-27

  • Table: 33-10-0198-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for employing personnel outside Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important, very important or not applicable, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period. Reasons for employing personnel outside Canada include: reduced labour costs, reduced costs other than labour costs, access to new markets, increased access to supply chains or regional trade networks, increased sales, proximity to important customers, access to specialized knowledge or technologies, tax or other financial incentives, improved logistics, lack of available labour in Canada and other reasons for employing personnel outside Canada. Estimates refer to fiscal year 2017 (end date falling after January 1, 2017 and on or before December 31, 2017).

    Release date: 2021-07-27

  • Table: 33-10-0199-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises that moved activities from outside Canada into Canada, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period.

    Release date: 2021-07-27

  • Table: 33-10-0201-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing production of goods activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important, very important or not applicable, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to production of goods.

    Release date: 2021-07-27

  • Table: 33-10-0202-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing distribution and logistics services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to distribution and logistics services.

    Release date: 2021-07-27

  • Table: 33-10-0203-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing call and help centre services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to call and help centre services.

    Release date: 2021-07-27

  • Table: 33-10-0204-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing marketing and sales services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to marketing and sales services.

    Release date: 2021-07-27

  • Table: 33-10-0205-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing information and communication technology (ICT) services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to information and communication technology (ICT) services.

    Release date: 2021-07-27
Analysis (47)

Analysis (47) (0 to 10 of 47 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20212084881
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2021-07-27

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100100004
    Description:

    In recent years, technological advancements in artificial intelligence and machine learning have broadened the realm of tasks that have the potential to be accomplished through automation technology. Consequently, these developments have raised questions about the future of work. Debate on this issue has focused primarily on the risk of job loss attributable to automation, with less attention given to how automation may change the nature of workers’ jobs. This study employs a task-based approach that shifts the focus from job replacement to changes in the nature of Canadians’ work. This approach views occupations as a set of tasks, allowing researchers to assess the effects of automation in the context of changes in occupational tasks.

    Release date: 2021-01-27

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202102723403
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2021-01-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020024
    Description:

    Recent improvements in robotics have rekindled ancient fears about the impact of robotics on humankind. Unfortunately, existing data seldom distinguishes robots from other types of automation, so research into their impact so far has been difficult. This article introduces research from a new Statistics Canada dataset, Robots!, on the impact of robots at the firm-level. The article examines the impact of robot investment on firm performance and employment at the enterprise level.

    Release date: 2020-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020025
    Description:

    Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, advances in artificial intelligence and robotics raised concerns that automation might lead to relatively high unemployment rates in the coming years. This Economic Insights article examines the degree to which Canadians’ views about the impact of automation on net job creation in 1989 materialized three decades later.

    Release date: 2020-11-02

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2020075
    Description:

    This infographic describes the invesment in robots in the Canadian economy and its impact on employment.

    Release date: 2020-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2020004
    Description:

    Recent advances in artificial intelligence have rekindled ancient fears that robots will replace humans in the economy. Previous waves of automation changed but did not reduce labour’s role, but robots’ human-like flexibility could make this time different. Whether or not it will is an empirical question that has lacked suitable data to answer. This paper describes the creation of a dataset to fill the evidence gap in Canada. Robots! is firm-level panel data on robot adoption created using Canadian import data. The data identify a substantial amount of the robot investment in the Canadian economy from 1996 to 2017. Although many robots are imported by robotics wholesalers or programmers for resale, the majority of them can be attributed to their final (direct) adopting firm. The data can be used to study the impact of robot adoption at the economic region, industry or firm-level.

    Release date: 2020-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020017
    Description:

    This study examines how employment and organizations have changed in response to robot adoption. As robotics and artificial intelligence (AI) become increasingly used by firms as the next engine of innovation and productivity growth, their effects on labour, firm practices and productivity have become a subject of growing importance. The study provides the most comprehensive evidence possible at the level of individual businesses on the employment and organizational effects of robot investments.

    Release date: 2020-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-637-X202000100009
    Description:

    As the ninth goal outlined in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, Canada and other UN member states have committed to build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation by 2030. This fact sheet provides an overview of indicators underlying the ninth Sustainable Development Goal in support of industry, innovation and infrastructure, and the statistics and data sources used to monitor and report on this goal in Canada.

    Release date: 2020-10-20

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202016122586
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2020-06-09
Reference (5)

Reference (5) ((5 results))

  • Classification: 12-604-X
    Description:

    The concordance table provides a link between data tables and the survey questions from the Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy (SIBS).

    Release date: 2021-07-30

  • Notices and consultations: 88-003-X20020026374
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's annual Economic Conference provides a forum for the exchange of empirical research among business, government, research and labour communities. The conference is also a means to promote economic and socio-economic analyses while subjecting existing data to critical assessment as part of an ongoing process of statistical development and review. This year's theme was Innovation in an Evolving Economy. At the May 6-7, 2002 conference there were 12 presentations, based directly on the analysis of Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division (SIEID) data. These presentations were given by SIEID analysts, by Statistics Canada analysts in other groups, by facilitated access researchers and by analysts using published or commissioned estimates.

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4224
    Description: The objective of the survey is to provide information on innovation, advanced technology and advanced practices being used in the construction and related industries.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5140
    Description: Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division is engaged in a joint project with Industry Canada to investigate the commercialization of innovation process in Canadian firms of small and medium size.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5171
    Description: Statistics Canada has undertaken this survey to provide statistical information on the strategic decisions, innovation activities and operational tactics used by Canadian enterprises. The survey also collects information on the involvement of enterprises in global value chains.
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