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  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000143
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper explores differences between innovative and non-innovative establishments in business service industries. It focuses on small establishments that supply core technical inputs to other firms: establishments in computer and related services, engineering, and other scientific and technical services.

    The analysis begins by examining the incidence of innovation within the small firm population. Forty percent of small businesses report introducing new or improved products, processes or organizational forms. Among these businesses, product innovation dominates over process or organizational change. A majority of these establishments reveal an ongoing commitment to innovation programs by introducing innovations on a regular basis. By contrast, businesses that do not introduce new or improved products, processes or organizational methods reveal little supporting evidence of innovation activity.

    The paper then investigates differences in strategic intensity between innovative and non-innovative businesses. Innovators attach greater importance to financial management and capital acquisition. Innovators also place more emphasis on recruiting skilled labour and on promoting incentive compensation. These distinctions are sensible - among small firms in R&D-intensive industries, financing and human resource competencies play a critical role in the innovation process.

    A final section examines whether the obstacles to innovation differ between innovators and non-innovators. Innovators are more likely to report difficulties related to market success, imitation, and skill restrictions. Evidence of learning-by-doing is more apparent within a multivariate framework. The probability of encountering risk-related obstacles and input restrictions is higher among establishments that engage in R&D and use intellectual property rights, both key elements of the innovation process. Many obstacles to innovation are also more apparent for businesses that stress financing, marketing, production or human resource strategies.

    Release date: 2000-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000127
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In studies of business innovation, the term innovation process is used to describe (i) the array of sources and objectives that culminate in the act of innovation, (ii) the set of market effects that result from innovation, and (iii) the obstacles that firms encounter when pursuing innovation strategies. An examination of the innovation process is thus designed to bring about a more comprehensive understanding of the characteristics that innovative firms share, as well as of those characteristics that set innovators apart from other businesses. The Survey of Innovation, 1996 examined innovation in three dynamic service industries: communications, financial services, and technical business services.

    This paper explores the principal findings to emerge from the Survey of Innovation, 1996. Two themes are apparent. In the first instance, many elements of the innovation process are common to all the service industries studied, such as an emphasis on product innovation, a strong customer orientation, and a commitment to service quality. Beyond these common elements, however, differences in competitive pressures across these industries serve to engender important differences in innovation strategies. Accordingly, much of what we can ultimately learn about the innovation process occurs at the industry level.

    Release date: 2000-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990025344
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A Statistics Canada study uses business demographics to learn about innovation and technological change and uncovers interesting patterns. Contrary to expectations, the author uncovered considerable volatility (start-ups and closures) in the service sector. The volatility rate for this sector was 31% compared with 23% for the manufacturing sector. Firms that do not innovate frequently are replaced by new ones that have new or improved products to offer or by those that employ more efficient methods of production and delivery.

    Release date: 2000-01-17

  • Articles and reports: 88F0017M1999007
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper looks at the impediments to innovations perceived by Canadian firms. It focuses on communication, financial services and technical business services.

    Release date: 1999-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999137
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper describes the evidence that several Statistics Canada studies have developed on the importance of innovation to growth and the need for highly skilled workers in the innovation process. Rather than focusing on broad industry aggregates as is often done, we concentrate our attention on firms and their behaviour. This allows us to investigate the connection between the success of businesses and the strategies that they pursue.

    We find that the more successful firms attribute their success to having developed competencies in a wide range of areas-but that the common factor that most frequently distinguishes faster from slower growing firms is innovation. Innovators in turn place greater emphasis on training and acquiring skilled workers.

    The studies also show that the emphasis on highly skilled workers varies across industries. In goods industries, a training strategy complements an innovation strategy that focuses on R&D, the adoption of new advanced technologies, or the development of new processes. Small firms that are innovative train their workers when they introduce new machinery and equipment. In the service sector, the innovation strategy relies less on new capital and more on new skills embodied in the workforce. Here there is evidence that a training strategy, by itself, has more impact on the success of a firm-probably because it is more likely to be the innovation strategy of the firm.

    Release date: 1999-11-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-517-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    New firms are seen to play a key role in the innovation process, especially in certain key sectors of the economy. This study therefore examines the differences in the profiles of successful new firms in science-based industries and other industries. The firms that are examined are entrants who survey into their early teen years. The study examines numerous factors that are seen to influence the success of new businesses. These include the competitive environment, business strategies and the financial structure of the businesses.

    Successful new firms in science-based industries are found to differ in a number of dimensions from new firms in other industries. They are more likely to be exporters. They face greater technological change and intense competition with regards to the rate at which new products are being introduced. They tend to put more emphasis on quality, the frequent introduction of new products and the customization of products. They make greater use of information technology. They place more stress on new technology development, research and development facilities and the use of intellectual property. They are much more likely to innovate and they place more importance on recruiting skilled labour and on training. Finally, they are more likely to use non-traditional financial measures to evaluate performance and they are less likely to rely on secured credit for financing both their research and development activity and their machinery and equipment that are firms in other sectors.

    Release date: 1999-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999121
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Entry and exit are important phenomena. This paper reviews the evidence on the size of this process and its contribution to productivity and innovation. It then develops a detailed portrait of the characteristics of new firms that survive and those that fail. In doing so, it examines the type of competencies that are developed in both groups of firms. It asks which competencies are developed by new firms. In particular, it focuses on the innovative capabilities of new firms. It shows that small firms in general and entrants in particular are heterogeneous when it comes to their innovative activity. The types of innovative activity in which they are engaged vary widely. Some focus on research and development (R&D) and new products. Others focus on new technologies. Still others stress the development of human capital. In addition, this paper examines the competitive environment that new firms face and the connection between growth and innovation. It also examines the complementary skills that are employed by innovators. Finally, the paper focuses on the causes of failure in the firm population. It extends earlier work that finds that failing firms differ from surviving firms in terms of basic competencies-management, financial management and marketing capabilities.

    Release date: 1999-02-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-516-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Innovation is at the heart of economic growth and development. It is through innovation that new products are brought to market, new production processes developed and organizational change realized. Given existing cross-industry variations in structure, competitiveness and maturity, it is reasonable to expect that firms in different industries will innovate for different reasons, in different ways and with different results. This report focuses on how the innovation activities of firms in three dynamic service industries are conditioned by their different environments.

    Through an understanding of what competitive pressures come into play and how these pressures affect the type of innovation that is performed, Innovation in dynamic service industries goes some way in illustrating how innovation regimes differ substantially, and quite logically, from one industry to another.

    This is the fifth in the series of publications on innovation and technological change in Canada. One of the earlier studies investigated the type of innovation taking place in the manufacturing sector (Baldwin and Da Pont, Innovation in Canadian manufacturing enterprises, Catalogue No. 88-513-XPB). Two others focused on advanced manufacturing technologies. The first (Baldwin and Sabourin, Technology adoption in Canadian manufacturing, Catalogue No. 88-512-XPB) outlined the intensity of use of these technologies. The second (Baldwin, Sabourin, and Rafiquzzaman, Benefits and problems associated with technology adoption, Catalogue No. 88-514-XPE) investigated the determinants of adoption. Another study (Baldwin, Innovation and intellectual property, Catalogue No. 88-515-XPE) examined how innovative firms protect their intellectual property after they have innovated.

    Release date: 1999-01-18

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X1998006
    Description:

    The results of this paper, An Overview of Statistical Indicators of Regional Innovation in Canada: A Provincial Comparison, contribute to the analysis of regional differences in science and technology activity in Canada, as part of the Information System for Science and Technology Project at Statistics Canada. This working paper presents estimates of R&D expenditure and personnel for universities, for the federal government, for industry and for provincial research organizations, as well as providing general provincial statistics. The objective of the Project is to develop useful indicators of activity and a framework to tie them together into a coherent picture of science and technology in Canada. The indicators can provide the picture at the national level or at provincial or sub-provincial levels to reflect regional differences. A previously published working paper, R&D Tax Treatment in Canada: A Provincial Comparison, uses a method developed by the Conference Board of Canada to compare the tax incentives to do R&D in each of the provinces. Six out of ten provinces have their own incentive programmes and tax rates which differ from province to province. The B-Index analysis of the Conference Board provides a means of comparing tax incentives and of providing an indicator.

    Release date: 1998-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 88F0017M1996002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The paper explores the conceptualization of knowledge, as opposed to information and other media.

    Release date: 1998-10-30
Data (23)

Data (23) (0 to 10 of 23 results)

  • Table: 33-10-0194-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    The number of full-time equivalent (FTE) personnel employed outside Canada by businesses that are not an affiliate of a foreign parent (in the United States of America, Mexico, other Latin American and Caribbean countries, Europe, China, other Asian countries or all other countries), by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period. Estimates refer to fiscal year 2017 (end date falling after January 1, 2017 and on or before December 31, 2017).

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0198-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for employing personnel outside Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important, very important or not applicable, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period. Reasons for employing personnel outside Canada include: reduced labour costs, reduced costs other than labour costs, access to new markets, increased access to supply chains or regional trade networks, increased sales, proximity to important customers, access to specialized knowledge or technologies, tax or other financial incentives, improved logistics, lack of available labour in Canada and other reasons for employing personnel outside Canada. Estimates refer to fiscal year 2017 (end date falling after January 1, 2017 and on or before December 31, 2017).

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0199-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises that moved activities from outside Canada into Canada, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0201-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing production of goods activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important, very important or not applicable, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to production of goods.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0202-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing distribution and logistics services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to distribution and logistics services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0203-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing call and help centre services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to call and help centre services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0204-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing marketing and sales services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to marketing and sales services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0205-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing information and communication technology (ICT) services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to information and communication technology (ICT) services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0206-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing professional services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to professional services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0207-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing engineering and research and development (R&D) services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to engineering and research and development (R&D) services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26
Analysis (36)

Analysis (36) (0 to 10 of 36 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2018034
    Description:

    This infographic presents results from the Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy relating to the innovation rates of Canadian enterprises between 2015 and 2017. The innovation rates were measured for product, process, organizational and marketing innovation. Results are presented by region, economic activity and enterprise size.

    Release date: 2018-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2009026
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper presents estimates of intangible investment in Canada for the purpose of innovation, advertising and resource extraction. It first expands upon work by Beckstead and Gellatly (2003), Baldwin and Hanel (2003), Beckstead and Gellatly (2003), Beckstead and Vinodrai (2003) and Baldwin and Beckstead (2003) who argue that the scope of innovative activity extends beyond research and development (R&D) as defined by the Frascati Manual. It extends the definition of innovative activities to include all scientific and engineering expenditures - regardless of whether they are market-based or produced with a firm. The paper also considers expenditures on intangible items such as brands or resource exploration.

    The paper contributes to the existing literature by creating intangible investment estimates (science and engineering knowledge, advertising, mineral exploration by industry) using Statistics Canada's high quality and internally consistent databases. It produces estimates that accord with other intangibles studies (Corrado, Hulten and Sichel 2005, 2006; Jalava, Ahmavarra and Alanen 2007) and shows that traditional R&D type investment estimates account for about a quarter of intangible science and engineering investments.

    Release date: 2009-12-02

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-003-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The bulletin summarizes and highlights new results in the analysis of science, technology and the information society. The articles cover current issues in science and technology activities, advanced technologies, innovation in industry and electronic media. The bulletin is designed to be easily readable by non-experts.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110590
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    As the onset of 2008 marks the 10th anniversary of the Innovation Analysis Bulletin, we are taking the opportunity to walk down memory lane to discover the story behind the creation of the Innovation Analysis Bulletin.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2007001
    Description:

    This study examines the factors that explain export orientation among Canadian Knowledge-Intensive Business Services (KIBS) firms, particularly innovativeness, while controlling for foreign control, size of establishment, training level of workforce, use of intellectual property protection and industry type. The data are based on the 2003 Survey of Innovation.

    Release date: 2007-04-03

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039530
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Held in Ottawa, Canada, in September 2006, the Blue Sky II Forum examined new areas for indicator development and set a broad agenda for future work on science, technology and innovation (STI) indicators. Emphasis was placed on indicators of outcomes and impacts in order to support monitoring, benchmarking, foresight, and evaluation activities, applied to policies and programs, and their economic and social impacts. As expected the Forum provided ideas and guidance for indicators work in both OECD-member and non-member countries as well as for other international organizations.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029243
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Innovative firms cite industry associations as important sources of ideas more frequently than they cite federal government research laboratories or universities according to data from Statistics Canada's 2003 Innovation Survey. We need a better understanding of the contributions and impact of nonprofit innovation enablers such as industry associations, and to achieve that we need to overcome obstacles to identifying them and their contributions in the data. Without this understanding, policy makers may overlook an important class of actual and potential innovation enablers.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029245
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    We are often asked what we have learned from working with clients, exchanging ideas with counterparts in other countries, in talking to our respondents and conducting surveys. This is the first of what we hope is an annual article highlighting in more detail some of the insights we have gained from our work.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060019100
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In the January 2002 issue, we reviewed the many new findings reported in the previous four years of the Innovation Analysis Bulletin. This article continues that tradition. We again discuss the insights that would not have been possible without the continued efforts of Statistics Canada's Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division with its Director, Dr. Fred Gault.

    Release date: 2006-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060019106
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In September, 2006, Statistics Canada will be hosting the Blue Sky II 2006 Forum. This forum will examine new areas for indicator development and set a broad agenda for future work on science, technology and innovation (STI) indicators. The Forum will emphasise indicators of outcomes and impacts that support monitoring, benchmarking, foresight activity, and evaluation, applied to policies and programs, and their economic and social impacts.

    Release date: 2006-02-27
Reference (5)

Reference (5) ((5 results))

  • Classification: 12-604-X
    Description:

    The concordance table provides a link between CANSIM tables and the survey questions from the Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy (SIBS).

    Release date: 2019-06-14

  • Notices and consultations: 88-003-X20020026374
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's annual Economic Conference provides a forum for the exchange of empirical research among business, government, research and labour communities. The conference is also a means to promote economic and socio-economic analyses while subjecting existing data to critical assessment as part of an ongoing process of statistical development and review. This year's theme was Innovation in an Evolving Economy. At the May 6-7, 2002 conference there were 12 presentations, based directly on the analysis of Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division (SIEID) data. These presentations were given by SIEID analysts, by Statistics Canada analysts in other groups, by facilitated access researchers and by analysts using published or commissioned estimates.

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4224
    Description: The objective of the survey is to provide information on innovation, advanced technology and advanced practices being used in the construction and related industries.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5140
    Description: Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division is engaged in a joint project with Industry Canada to investigate the commercialization of innovation process in Canadian firms of small and medium size.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5171
    Description: Statistics Canada has undertaken this survey to provide statistical information on the strategic decisions, innovation activities and operational tactics used by Canadian enterprises. The survey also collects information on the involvement of enterprises in global value chains.
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