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All (64) (0 to 10 of 64 results)

  • Classification: 12-604-X
    Description:

    The concordance table provides a link between CANSIM tables and the survey questions from the Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy (SIBS).

    Release date: 2019-06-14

  • Table: 33-10-0194-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    The number of full-time equivalent (FTE) personnel employed outside Canada by businesses that are not an affiliate of a foreign parent (in the United States of America, Mexico, other Latin American and Caribbean countries, Europe, China, other Asian countries or all other countries), by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period. Estimates refer to fiscal year 2017 (end date falling after January 1, 2017 and on or before December 31, 2017).

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0198-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for employing personnel outside Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important, very important or not applicable, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period. Reasons for employing personnel outside Canada include: reduced labour costs, reduced costs other than labour costs, access to new markets, increased access to supply chains or regional trade networks, increased sales, proximity to important customers, access to specialized knowledge or technologies, tax or other financial incentives, improved logistics, lack of available labour in Canada and other reasons for employing personnel outside Canada. Estimates refer to fiscal year 2017 (end date falling after January 1, 2017 and on or before December 31, 2017).

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0199-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises that moved activities from outside Canada into Canada, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0201-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing production of goods activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important, very important or not applicable, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to production of goods.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0202-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing distribution and logistics services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to distribution and logistics services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0203-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing call and help centre services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to call and help centre services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0204-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing marketing and sales services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to marketing and sales services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0205-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing information and communication technology (ICT) services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to information and communication technology (ICT) services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0206-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing professional services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to professional services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26
Data (23)

Data (23) (0 to 10 of 23 results)

  • Table: 33-10-0194-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    The number of full-time equivalent (FTE) personnel employed outside Canada by businesses that are not an affiliate of a foreign parent (in the United States of America, Mexico, other Latin American and Caribbean countries, Europe, China, other Asian countries or all other countries), by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period. Estimates refer to fiscal year 2017 (end date falling after January 1, 2017 and on or before December 31, 2017).

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0198-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for employing personnel outside Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important, very important or not applicable, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period. Reasons for employing personnel outside Canada include: reduced labour costs, reduced costs other than labour costs, access to new markets, increased access to supply chains or regional trade networks, increased sales, proximity to important customers, access to specialized knowledge or technologies, tax or other financial incentives, improved logistics, lack of available labour in Canada and other reasons for employing personnel outside Canada. Estimates refer to fiscal year 2017 (end date falling after January 1, 2017 and on or before December 31, 2017).

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0199-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises that moved activities from outside Canada into Canada, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0201-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing production of goods activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important, very important or not applicable, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to production of goods.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0202-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing distribution and logistics services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to distribution and logistics services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0203-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing call and help centre services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to call and help centre services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0204-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing marketing and sales services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to marketing and sales services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0205-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing information and communication technology (ICT) services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to information and communication technology (ICT) services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0206-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing professional services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to professional services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0207-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing engineering and research and development (R&D) services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to engineering and research and development (R&D) services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26
Analysis (36)

Analysis (36) (30 to 40 of 36 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-517-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    New firms are seen to play a key role in the innovation process, especially in certain key sectors of the economy. This study therefore examines the differences in the profiles of successful new firms in science-based industries and other industries. The firms that are examined are entrants who survey into their early teen years. The study examines numerous factors that are seen to influence the success of new businesses. These include the competitive environment, business strategies and the financial structure of the businesses.

    Successful new firms in science-based industries are found to differ in a number of dimensions from new firms in other industries. They are more likely to be exporters. They face greater technological change and intense competition with regards to the rate at which new products are being introduced. They tend to put more emphasis on quality, the frequent introduction of new products and the customization of products. They make greater use of information technology. They place more stress on new technology development, research and development facilities and the use of intellectual property. They are much more likely to innovate and they place more importance on recruiting skilled labour and on training. Finally, they are more likely to use non-traditional financial measures to evaluate performance and they are less likely to rely on secured credit for financing both their research and development activity and their machinery and equipment that are firms in other sectors.

    Release date: 1999-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999121
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Entry and exit are important phenomena. This paper reviews the evidence on the size of this process and its contribution to productivity and innovation. It then develops a detailed portrait of the characteristics of new firms that survive and those that fail. In doing so, it examines the type of competencies that are developed in both groups of firms. It asks which competencies are developed by new firms. In particular, it focuses on the innovative capabilities of new firms. It shows that small firms in general and entrants in particular are heterogeneous when it comes to their innovative activity. The types of innovative activity in which they are engaged vary widely. Some focus on research and development (R&D) and new products. Others focus on new technologies. Still others stress the development of human capital. In addition, this paper examines the competitive environment that new firms face and the connection between growth and innovation. It also examines the complementary skills that are employed by innovators. Finally, the paper focuses on the causes of failure in the firm population. It extends earlier work that finds that failing firms differ from surviving firms in terms of basic competencies-management, financial management and marketing capabilities.

    Release date: 1999-02-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-516-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Innovation is at the heart of economic growth and development. It is through innovation that new products are brought to market, new production processes developed and organizational change realized. Given existing cross-industry variations in structure, competitiveness and maturity, it is reasonable to expect that firms in different industries will innovate for different reasons, in different ways and with different results. This report focuses on how the innovation activities of firms in three dynamic service industries are conditioned by their different environments.

    Through an understanding of what competitive pressures come into play and how these pressures affect the type of innovation that is performed, Innovation in dynamic service industries goes some way in illustrating how innovation regimes differ substantially, and quite logically, from one industry to another.

    This is the fifth in the series of publications on innovation and technological change in Canada. One of the earlier studies investigated the type of innovation taking place in the manufacturing sector (Baldwin and Da Pont, Innovation in Canadian manufacturing enterprises, Catalogue No. 88-513-XPB). Two others focused on advanced manufacturing technologies. The first (Baldwin and Sabourin, Technology adoption in Canadian manufacturing, Catalogue No. 88-512-XPB) outlined the intensity of use of these technologies. The second (Baldwin, Sabourin, and Rafiquzzaman, Benefits and problems associated with technology adoption, Catalogue No. 88-514-XPE) investigated the determinants of adoption. Another study (Baldwin, Innovation and intellectual property, Catalogue No. 88-515-XPE) examined how innovative firms protect their intellectual property after they have innovated.

    Release date: 1999-01-18

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X1998006
    Description:

    The results of this paper, An Overview of Statistical Indicators of Regional Innovation in Canada: A Provincial Comparison, contribute to the analysis of regional differences in science and technology activity in Canada, as part of the Information System for Science and Technology Project at Statistics Canada. This working paper presents estimates of R&D expenditure and personnel for universities, for the federal government, for industry and for provincial research organizations, as well as providing general provincial statistics. The objective of the Project is to develop useful indicators of activity and a framework to tie them together into a coherent picture of science and technology in Canada. The indicators can provide the picture at the national level or at provincial or sub-provincial levels to reflect regional differences. A previously published working paper, R&D Tax Treatment in Canada: A Provincial Comparison, uses a method developed by the Conference Board of Canada to compare the tax incentives to do R&D in each of the provinces. Six out of ten provinces have their own incentive programmes and tax rates which differ from province to province. The B-Index analysis of the Conference Board provides a means of comparing tax incentives and of providing an indicator.

    Release date: 1998-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 88F0017M1996002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The paper explores the conceptualization of knowledge, as opposed to information and other media.

    Release date: 1998-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X1997012
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is engaged in a project "Information System for Science and Technology" which purpose is to develop useful indicators of activity and a framework to tie them together into a coherent picture of science and technology (S&T) in Canada. The Working papers series is used to publish results of the different initiatives conducted within this project. The produced data are related to the activities, linkages and outcomes of S&T. Several key areas are covered such as: innovation, technology diffusion, human resources in S&T and interrelations between different actors involved in S&T. This series also presents important data tabulations taken from regular surveys on R&D and S&T and made possible because of the existing Project.

    Release date: 1998-09-25
Reference (5)

Reference (5) ((5 results))

  • Classification: 12-604-X
    Description:

    The concordance table provides a link between CANSIM tables and the survey questions from the Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy (SIBS).

    Release date: 2019-06-14

  • Notices and consultations: 88-003-X20020026374
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's annual Economic Conference provides a forum for the exchange of empirical research among business, government, research and labour communities. The conference is also a means to promote economic and socio-economic analyses while subjecting existing data to critical assessment as part of an ongoing process of statistical development and review. This year's theme was Innovation in an Evolving Economy. At the May 6-7, 2002 conference there were 12 presentations, based directly on the analysis of Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division (SIEID) data. These presentations were given by SIEID analysts, by Statistics Canada analysts in other groups, by facilitated access researchers and by analysts using published or commissioned estimates.

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4224
    Description: The objective of the survey is to provide information on innovation, advanced technology and advanced practices being used in the construction and related industries.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5140
    Description: Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division is engaged in a joint project with Industry Canada to investigate the commercialization of innovation process in Canadian firms of small and medium size.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5171
    Description: Statistics Canada has undertaken this survey to provide statistical information on the strategic decisions, innovation activities and operational tactics used by Canadian enterprises. The survey also collects information on the involvement of enterprises in global value chains.
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