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All (64) (0 to 10 of 64 results)

  • Classification: 12-604-X
    Description:

    The concordance table provides a link between CANSIM tables and the survey questions from the Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy (SIBS).

    Release date: 2019-06-14

  • Table: 33-10-0194-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    The number of full-time equivalent (FTE) personnel employed outside Canada by businesses that are not an affiliate of a foreign parent (in the United States of America, Mexico, other Latin American and Caribbean countries, Europe, China, other Asian countries or all other countries), by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period. Estimates refer to fiscal year 2017 (end date falling after January 1, 2017 and on or before December 31, 2017).

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0198-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for employing personnel outside Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important, very important or not applicable, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period. Reasons for employing personnel outside Canada include: reduced labour costs, reduced costs other than labour costs, access to new markets, increased access to supply chains or regional trade networks, increased sales, proximity to important customers, access to specialized knowledge or technologies, tax or other financial incentives, improved logistics, lack of available labour in Canada and other reasons for employing personnel outside Canada. Estimates refer to fiscal year 2017 (end date falling after January 1, 2017 and on or before December 31, 2017).

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0199-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises that moved activities from outside Canada into Canada, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0201-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing production of goods activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important, very important or not applicable, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to production of goods.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0202-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing distribution and logistics services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to distribution and logistics services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0203-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing call and help centre services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to call and help centre services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0204-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing marketing and sales services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to marketing and sales services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0205-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing information and communication technology (ICT) services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to information and communication technology (ICT) services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0206-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing professional services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to professional services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26
Data (23)

Data (23) (0 to 10 of 23 results)

  • Table: 33-10-0194-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    The number of full-time equivalent (FTE) personnel employed outside Canada by businesses that are not an affiliate of a foreign parent (in the United States of America, Mexico, other Latin American and Caribbean countries, Europe, China, other Asian countries or all other countries), by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period. Estimates refer to fiscal year 2017 (end date falling after January 1, 2017 and on or before December 31, 2017).

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0198-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for employing personnel outside Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important, very important or not applicable, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period. Reasons for employing personnel outside Canada include: reduced labour costs, reduced costs other than labour costs, access to new markets, increased access to supply chains or regional trade networks, increased sales, proximity to important customers, access to specialized knowledge or technologies, tax or other financial incentives, improved logistics, lack of available labour in Canada and other reasons for employing personnel outside Canada. Estimates refer to fiscal year 2017 (end date falling after January 1, 2017 and on or before December 31, 2017).

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0199-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises that moved activities from outside Canada into Canada, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0201-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing production of goods activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important, very important or not applicable, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to production of goods.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0202-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing distribution and logistics services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to distribution and logistics services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0203-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing call and help centre services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to call and help centre services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0204-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing marketing and sales services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to marketing and sales services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0205-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing information and communication technology (ICT) services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to information and communication technology (ICT) services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0206-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing professional services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to professional services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0207-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing engineering and research and development (R&D) services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to engineering and research and development (R&D) services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26
Analysis (36)

Analysis (36) (10 to 20 of 36 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004007
    Description:

    This paper presents data on technological change that have been made comparable from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) for 2000 and 2002. It shows that when comparable data for the 1998 to 2000 and 2000 to 2002 periods (based on the definition and survey universe employed by SECT 2000) are used, the propensity to adopt new technologies in the private sector has remained constant at about 40%. The rate of technology adoption in the public sector remained at four out of five organizations introducing significantly improved technologies (a level about twice as high as that for the private sector). This rate also shows little change from 2000. The paper presents the comparable technological change data, while explaining differences in the wording of the survey questions and universe between the two reference years. Information is provided for private and public sectors, selected employment size groups and sectors of both private and public sectors.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016794
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For two full days, more than 20 theorists, empiricists and policy developers from North America and Europe discussed innovation from different perspective. They sought common understanding of the issues and consensus on where work on innovation should be going in the medium- and longer-term. This meeting was part of the foresight program of Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division at Statistics Canada. Many valuable insights were gained as members of different communities of discourse exchanged their knowledge and arrived at common conclusions.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004004
    Description:

    These notes capture some of the presentations and the subsequent discussions that took place during the meeting of Statistics Canada's Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division. For two full days, over 20 people talked about innovation from different perspectives and sought common understanding of the issues and consensus on where work on the subject should take the form of medium or longer terms. The meeting had a Canadian bias as it was part of the foresight progam of the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division, but it would not have been as productive had Jan Fagerberg not been able to join the group and share the work of the Towards a European Area of Research and Innovation (TEARI) project, which he leads. The meeting was further enriched by the insights gained as members of different communities of discourse exchanged their knowledge and arrived at common conclusions.

    Release date: 2004-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003006
    Description:

    This working paper is based on a speech delivered by Judith Maxwell, President of the Canadian Policy Research Networks. In her discourse, Ms. Maxwell challenged her listeners to 'think outside of the box' on innovation and to be creative in how they approached the topic. For her, innovation extends beyond economic activities into societal interactions and culture. Therefore, innovation translates into more than productivity growth and improved efficiency, but also better living, working and learning conditions.

    Release date: 2003-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036375
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A theoretical link between innovation and economic growth has been contemplated since the late 1700s. Professor Ajay Agrawal discusses the significance of knowledge spillovers, the relation to innovation and growth, and the closely related concept of absorptive capacity. Clearly, the immense complexity of the issue of innovation and economic growth has increased scholarly interest in the topic.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036379
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Rapid progress in skilled-biased technologies has increased the demand for skilled workers in all countries. The importance of skills for innovation and productivity in Canada is examined in this Industry Canada study.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2002012
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's Survey of Innovation 1999 surveyed manufacturing in the fall of 1999. It was the first innovation survey of selected natural resource industries. This paper is part of a series of working papers based on the Survey of Innovation 1999. This paper details the survey methodology, including decisions taken and lessons learned regarding survey design.

    Release date: 2002-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016151
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In recent years, comparing national innovative performances has become increasingly important as countries recognize the importance of innovation for economic growth.

    Release date: 2002-02-15

  • Journals and periodicals: 88F0017M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is engaged in an Information System for Science and Technology Project which purpose is to develop useful indicators of activity and a framework to tie them together into a coherent picture of science and technology in Canada. This series publishes analytical work relating to science and technology issues. These documents relate to specific questions or complex analyses derived from survey results conducted at Statistics Canada. More speculative studies related to science and technology issues are also published.

    Release date: 2001-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035967
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 1997, 41% of engineering services firms identified themselves as innovators, but only 4% of them had introduced breakthrough products or processes that had the potential of putting these firms in the role of global leaders. There's more than meets the eye in interpreting the myriad of indicators describing the "system of innovation".

    Release date: 2001-10-31
Reference (5)

Reference (5) ((5 results))

  • Classification: 12-604-X
    Description:

    The concordance table provides a link between CANSIM tables and the survey questions from the Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy (SIBS).

    Release date: 2019-06-14

  • Notices and consultations: 88-003-X20020026374
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's annual Economic Conference provides a forum for the exchange of empirical research among business, government, research and labour communities. The conference is also a means to promote economic and socio-economic analyses while subjecting existing data to critical assessment as part of an ongoing process of statistical development and review. This year's theme was Innovation in an Evolving Economy. At the May 6-7, 2002 conference there were 12 presentations, based directly on the analysis of Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division (SIEID) data. These presentations were given by SIEID analysts, by Statistics Canada analysts in other groups, by facilitated access researchers and by analysts using published or commissioned estimates.

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4224
    Description: The objective of the survey is to provide information on innovation, advanced technology and advanced practices being used in the construction and related industries.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5140
    Description: Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division is engaged in a joint project with Industry Canada to investigate the commercialization of innovation process in Canadian firms of small and medium size.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5171
    Description: Statistics Canada has undertaken this survey to provide statistical information on the strategic decisions, innovation activities and operational tactics used by Canadian enterprises. The survey also collects information on the involvement of enterprises in global value chains.
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