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All (64) (0 to 10 of 64 results)

  • Classification: 12-604-X
    Description:

    The concordance table provides a link between CANSIM tables and the survey questions from the Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy (SIBS).

    Release date: 2019-06-14

  • Table: 33-10-0194-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    The number of full-time equivalent (FTE) personnel employed outside Canada by businesses that are not an affiliate of a foreign parent (in the United States of America, Mexico, other Latin American and Caribbean countries, Europe, China, other Asian countries or all other countries), by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period. Estimates refer to fiscal year 2017 (end date falling after January 1, 2017 and on or before December 31, 2017).

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0198-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for employing personnel outside Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important, very important or not applicable, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period. Reasons for employing personnel outside Canada include: reduced labour costs, reduced costs other than labour costs, access to new markets, increased access to supply chains or regional trade networks, increased sales, proximity to important customers, access to specialized knowledge or technologies, tax or other financial incentives, improved logistics, lack of available labour in Canada and other reasons for employing personnel outside Canada. Estimates refer to fiscal year 2017 (end date falling after January 1, 2017 and on or before December 31, 2017).

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0199-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises that moved activities from outside Canada into Canada, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0201-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing production of goods activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important, very important or not applicable, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to production of goods.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0202-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing distribution and logistics services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to distribution and logistics services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0203-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing call and help centre services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to call and help centre services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0204-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing marketing and sales services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to marketing and sales services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0205-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing information and communication technology (ICT) services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to information and communication technology (ICT) services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0206-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing professional services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to professional services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26
Data (23)

Data (23) (0 to 10 of 23 results)

  • Table: 33-10-0194-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    The number of full-time equivalent (FTE) personnel employed outside Canada by businesses that are not an affiliate of a foreign parent (in the United States of America, Mexico, other Latin American and Caribbean countries, Europe, China, other Asian countries or all other countries), by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period. Estimates refer to fiscal year 2017 (end date falling after January 1, 2017 and on or before December 31, 2017).

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0198-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for employing personnel outside Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important, very important or not applicable, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period. Reasons for employing personnel outside Canada include: reduced labour costs, reduced costs other than labour costs, access to new markets, increased access to supply chains or regional trade networks, increased sales, proximity to important customers, access to specialized knowledge or technologies, tax or other financial incentives, improved logistics, lack of available labour in Canada and other reasons for employing personnel outside Canada. Estimates refer to fiscal year 2017 (end date falling after January 1, 2017 and on or before December 31, 2017).

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0199-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises that moved activities from outside Canada into Canada, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0201-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing production of goods activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important, very important or not applicable, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to production of goods.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0202-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing distribution and logistics services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to distribution and logistics services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0203-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing call and help centre services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to call and help centre services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0204-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing marketing and sales services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to marketing and sales services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0205-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing information and communication technology (ICT) services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to information and communication technology (ICT) services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0206-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing professional services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to professional services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Table: 33-10-0207-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific reasons for bringing engineering and research and development (R&D) services activities to Canada were not at all important, somewhat important, important or very important, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a three-year observation period. Reasons for bringing business activities to Canada include cost savings from locating abroad did not materialize (lower operating costs), labour costs abroad have risen (lower labour costs in Canada), better quality of labour or resources in Canada, lower Canadian dollar, consolidating number of suppliers, tax or other financial incentives, concerns about intellectual property, proximity to customers or other logistical issues, and other reasons related to engineering and research and development (R&D) services.

    Release date: 2019-03-26
Analysis (36)

Analysis (36) (20 to 30 of 36 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010015586
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Knowledge leads to innovation and innovation, in turn, sets in motion a new cycle of learning as firms try to find solutions to complex problems. A survey of innovation covering the three-year period 1994-96 ranks more than 2,000 firms on a knowledge-intensity scale.

    Release date: 2001-03-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000123
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Recent studies have demonstrated the quantitative importance of entry, exit, growth and decline in the industrial population. It is this turnover that rewards innovative activity and contributes to productivity growth.

    While the size of the entry population is impressive - especially when cumulated over time - the importance of entry is ultimately due to its impact on innovation in the economy. Experimentation is important in a dynamic, market-based economy. A key part of the experimentation comes from entrants. New entrepreneurs constantly offer consumers new products both in terms of the basic good and the level of service that accompanies it.

    This experimentation is associated with significant costs since many entrants fail. Young firms are most at risk of failure; data drawn from a longitudinal file of Canadian entrants in both the goods and service sectors show that over half the new firms that fail do so in the first two years of life. Life is short for the majority of entrants. Only 1 in 5 new firms survive to their tenth birthday.

    Since so many entrants fall by the wayside, it is of inherent interest to understand the conditions that are associated with success, the conditions that allow the potential in new entrepreneurs to come to fruition. The success of an entrant is due to its choosing the correct combination of strategies and activities. To understand how these capabilities contribute to growth, it is necessary to study how the performance of entrants relates to differences in strategies and pursued activities.

    This paper describes the environment and the characteristics of entrants that manage to survive and grow. In doing so, it focuses on two issues. The first is the innovativeness of entrants and the extent to which their growth depends on their innovativeness. The second is to outline how the stress on worker skills, which is partially related to training, complements innovation and contributes to growth.

    Release date: 2000-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20000035768
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Why do innovation surveys produce radically different estimates of the number of R&D performers than R&D surveys? The factors contributing to divergence are presented with detail on selected contributors.

    Release date: 2000-10-06

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20000035776
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Location, location, location - is it important in research and technology? Statistics Canada survey data are being used to provide a new approach to analyze the usefulness of mapping key innovation indicators. By attaching survey data sets to sources with a larger sample size, detailed geographic distributions of establishments are estimated. Numerous data sets are being explored with the benefits to be realized in an interactive GIS.

    Release date: 2000-10-06

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20000025116
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Innovation is the basis for progress and the key to success for many organizations. This article examines the effect of perceived barriers to innovation by sector. For instance, the financial services sector is cautious about new technological developments due to feasibility risks and markets outlets.

    Release date: 2000-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000143
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper explores differences between innovative and non-innovative establishments in business service industries. It focuses on small establishments that supply core technical inputs to other firms: establishments in computer and related services, engineering, and other scientific and technical services.

    The analysis begins by examining the incidence of innovation within the small firm population. Forty percent of small businesses report introducing new or improved products, processes or organizational forms. Among these businesses, product innovation dominates over process or organizational change. A majority of these establishments reveal an ongoing commitment to innovation programs by introducing innovations on a regular basis. By contrast, businesses that do not introduce new or improved products, processes or organizational methods reveal little supporting evidence of innovation activity.

    The paper then investigates differences in strategic intensity between innovative and non-innovative businesses. Innovators attach greater importance to financial management and capital acquisition. Innovators also place more emphasis on recruiting skilled labour and on promoting incentive compensation. These distinctions are sensible - among small firms in R&D-intensive industries, financing and human resource competencies play a critical role in the innovation process.

    A final section examines whether the obstacles to innovation differ between innovators and non-innovators. Innovators are more likely to report difficulties related to market success, imitation, and skill restrictions. Evidence of learning-by-doing is more apparent within a multivariate framework. The probability of encountering risk-related obstacles and input restrictions is higher among establishments that engage in R&D and use intellectual property rights, both key elements of the innovation process. Many obstacles to innovation are also more apparent for businesses that stress financing, marketing, production or human resource strategies.

    Release date: 2000-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000127
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In studies of business innovation, the term innovation process is used to describe (i) the array of sources and objectives that culminate in the act of innovation, (ii) the set of market effects that result from innovation, and (iii) the obstacles that firms encounter when pursuing innovation strategies. An examination of the innovation process is thus designed to bring about a more comprehensive understanding of the characteristics that innovative firms share, as well as of those characteristics that set innovators apart from other businesses. The Survey of Innovation, 1996 examined innovation in three dynamic service industries: communications, financial services, and technical business services.

    This paper explores the principal findings to emerge from the Survey of Innovation, 1996. Two themes are apparent. In the first instance, many elements of the innovation process are common to all the service industries studied, such as an emphasis on product innovation, a strong customer orientation, and a commitment to service quality. Beyond these common elements, however, differences in competitive pressures across these industries serve to engender important differences in innovation strategies. Accordingly, much of what we can ultimately learn about the innovation process occurs at the industry level.

    Release date: 2000-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990025344
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A Statistics Canada study uses business demographics to learn about innovation and technological change and uncovers interesting patterns. Contrary to expectations, the author uncovered considerable volatility (start-ups and closures) in the service sector. The volatility rate for this sector was 31% compared with 23% for the manufacturing sector. Firms that do not innovate frequently are replaced by new ones that have new or improved products to offer or by those that employ more efficient methods of production and delivery.

    Release date: 2000-01-17

  • Articles and reports: 88F0017M1999007
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper looks at the impediments to innovations perceived by Canadian firms. It focuses on communication, financial services and technical business services.

    Release date: 1999-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999137
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper describes the evidence that several Statistics Canada studies have developed on the importance of innovation to growth and the need for highly skilled workers in the innovation process. Rather than focusing on broad industry aggregates as is often done, we concentrate our attention on firms and their behaviour. This allows us to investigate the connection between the success of businesses and the strategies that they pursue.

    We find that the more successful firms attribute their success to having developed competencies in a wide range of areas-but that the common factor that most frequently distinguishes faster from slower growing firms is innovation. Innovators in turn place greater emphasis on training and acquiring skilled workers.

    The studies also show that the emphasis on highly skilled workers varies across industries. In goods industries, a training strategy complements an innovation strategy that focuses on R&D, the adoption of new advanced technologies, or the development of new processes. Small firms that are innovative train their workers when they introduce new machinery and equipment. In the service sector, the innovation strategy relies less on new capital and more on new skills embodied in the workforce. Here there is evidence that a training strategy, by itself, has more impact on the success of a firm-probably because it is more likely to be the innovation strategy of the firm.

    Release date: 1999-11-30
Reference (5)

Reference (5) ((5 results))

  • Classification: 12-604-X
    Description:

    The concordance table provides a link between CANSIM tables and the survey questions from the Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy (SIBS).

    Release date: 2019-06-14

  • Notices and consultations: 88-003-X20020026374
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's annual Economic Conference provides a forum for the exchange of empirical research among business, government, research and labour communities. The conference is also a means to promote economic and socio-economic analyses while subjecting existing data to critical assessment as part of an ongoing process of statistical development and review. This year's theme was Innovation in an Evolving Economy. At the May 6-7, 2002 conference there were 12 presentations, based directly on the analysis of Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division (SIEID) data. These presentations were given by SIEID analysts, by Statistics Canada analysts in other groups, by facilitated access researchers and by analysts using published or commissioned estimates.

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4224
    Description: The objective of the survey is to provide information on innovation, advanced technology and advanced practices being used in the construction and related industries.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5140
    Description: Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division is engaged in a joint project with Industry Canada to investigate the commercialization of innovation process in Canadian firms of small and medium size.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5171
    Description: Statistics Canada has undertaken this survey to provide statistical information on the strategic decisions, innovation activities and operational tactics used by Canadian enterprises. The survey also collects information on the involvement of enterprises in global value chains.
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