Business adaptation and adjustment

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All (42) (0 to 10 of 42 results)

  • Table: 33-10-0164-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 527-0001)
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This table contains 2736 series, with data starting from 2001 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years). This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 item: Canada) Business dynamics measure (16 items: Number of active employer businesses in the private sector; Number of entrants; Number of incumbents; Number of exits; ...) North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) (19 items: Private sector; Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting; Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction; Utilities; ...) Firm size (9 items: Private sector; From 0 to less than 100 employees; From 0 to less than 50 employees; Less than 5 employees; ...).

    Release date: 2018-06-11

  • Table: 33-10-0165-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 527-0013)
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This table contains 170 series, with data for years 2000 - 2017 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years). This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 item: Canada) Business dynamics measure (10 items: Number of active employer businesses in the private sector; Number of entrants; Number of exits; Entry rate; ...) North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) (17 items: Private sector; Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting; Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction; Utilities; ...).

    Release date: 2018-04-03

  • Table: 16F0006X
    Description:

    This document presents operating and capital expenditures made by primary and manufacturing industries in response to, or in anticipation of, environmental regulations and conventions. It also reports the use of environmental management processes and technologies including those used to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by Canadian businesses. The results are from the Survey of Environmental Protection Expenditures. The data contained in Environmental protection expenditures in the business sector help to fill important gaps in existing information on the demand side of the 'environment industry'. More specifically, it provides a measure of the cost to the industry of adopting pollution prevention and abatement technologies and other environmental protection practices. The document presents comparisons of current year spending with previous years' expenditures.

    Release date: 2012-12-17

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20121875720
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-07-05

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20121795601
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2012024
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper looks at annual changes in Canadian business sector employment from 2001 to 2009. This period encompasses an expansionary phase (2001 to 2008), followed by a recession (2008/2009). Firm-level data are used to decompose yearly net employment change into gross employment creation and destruction, which makes it possible to measure the size of total annual employment reallocation. These measures of employment turnover are compared across industries and firm size classes.

    Release date: 2012-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2012078
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper asks how market expansion contributes to productivity growth. It investigates whether entry to both new international markets and new domestic markets is associated with greater productivity growth. It also examines whether exit from export markets is necessarily associated with deteriorating performance or whether it too can lead to success when associated with movements to new markets. Finally, the paper examines the strategy of firms that move to new markets after they withdraw from export markets in order to examine the differences that set them apart from their counterparts that do not find themselves able to adapt because they simply withdraw to their home domestic markets.

    Release date: 2012-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010063
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines how trade liberalization and fluctuations in real exchange rates affect export-market entry/exit and plant-level productivity. It uses the experience of Canadian manufacturing plants over three separate periods that featuring different rates of bilateral tariff reduction and differing movements in bilateral real exchange rates. The patterns of entry and exit responses as well as the productivity outcomes differ markedly in the three periods. Consistent with much of the recent literature, the paper finds that plants self-select into export markets-that is, more efficient plants are more likely to enter and less likely to exit export markets. The reverse also occurs: entrants to export markets improve their productivity performance relative to the population from which they originated and plants that stay in export markets do better than comparable plants that exited, lending support to the thesis that exporting boosts productivity. Finally, we find that overall market access conditions, including real exchange rate trends, significantly affect the extent of productivity gains to be derived from participating in export markets. In particular, the increase in the value of the Canadian dollar during the post-2002 period almost completely offset the productivity growth advantages that new export-market participants would otherwise have enjoyed.

    Release date: 2010-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010061
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    We examine the simultaneous effects of real-exchange-rate movements and of tariff reductions on plant death in Canadian manufacturing industries between 1979 and 1996. We find that both currency appreciation and tariff cuts increase the probability of plant death, but that tariff reductions have a much greater effect. Consistent with the implications of recent international-trade models involving heterogeneous firms, we further find that the effect of exchange-rate movements and tariff cuts on exit are heterogeneous across plants - particularly pronounced among least efficient plants. Our results reveal multi-dimensional heterogeneity that current models featuring one-dimensional heterogeneity (efficiency differences among plants) cannot fully explain. There are significant and substantial differences between exporters and non-exporters, and between domestic- and foreign- controlled plants. Exporters and foreign-owned plants have much lower failure rates; however, their survival is more sensitive to changes in tariffs and real exchange rates, whether differences in their efficiency levels are controlled or not.

    Release date: 2010-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2008020
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper presents the long-term trends in outsourcing and offshoring across Canadian industries.

    Release date: 2008-10-27
Data (6)

Data (6) ((6 results))

  • Table: 33-10-0164-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 527-0001)
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This table contains 2736 series, with data starting from 2001 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years). This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 item: Canada) Business dynamics measure (16 items: Number of active employer businesses in the private sector; Number of entrants; Number of incumbents; Number of exits; ...) North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) (19 items: Private sector; Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting; Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction; Utilities; ...) Firm size (9 items: Private sector; From 0 to less than 100 employees; From 0 to less than 50 employees; Less than 5 employees; ...).

    Release date: 2018-06-11

  • Table: 33-10-0165-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 527-0013)
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This table contains 170 series, with data for years 2000 - 2017 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years). This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 item: Canada) Business dynamics measure (10 items: Number of active employer businesses in the private sector; Number of entrants; Number of exits; Entry rate; ...) North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) (17 items: Private sector; Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting; Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction; Utilities; ...).

    Release date: 2018-04-03

  • Table: 16F0006X
    Description:

    This document presents operating and capital expenditures made by primary and manufacturing industries in response to, or in anticipation of, environmental regulations and conventions. It also reports the use of environmental management processes and technologies including those used to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by Canadian businesses. The results are from the Survey of Environmental Protection Expenditures. The data contained in Environmental protection expenditures in the business sector help to fill important gaps in existing information on the demand side of the 'environment industry'. More specifically, it provides a measure of the cost to the industry of adopting pollution prevention and abatement technologies and other environmental protection practices. The document presents comparisons of current year spending with previous years' expenditures.

    Release date: 2012-12-17

  • Table: 51F0007X
    Description:

    For most of the post-war period, Canada and the United States have utilized an open regime to govern trade relations between the two countries. Such has not always been the case for transborder air services, however. In 1966, the two countries signed an air services accord (ASA) that governed commercial air services between the two. The 1966 accord was quite restrictive, limiting entry and price competition in transborder markets. This restrictive agreement governed Canada-U.S. air service for almost 30 years, finally being replaced in 1995 with a new ASA that has granted entry and pricing freedom in transborder markets.

    Release date: 2001-06-05

  • Table: 16F0006P
    Description:

    Environmental protection expenditures in the business sector, preliminary data presents operating and capital expenditures made by primary and manufacturing industries in response to, or in anticipation of, environmental regulations and conventions. The results are from the Environmental Protection Expenditure Survey. The data contained in Environmental protection expenditures in the business sector help to fill important gaps in existing information on the demand side of the 'environment industry.' More specifically, it provides a measure of the cost to the industry of adopting pollution prevention and abatement technologies and other environmental protection practices. Data included in Environmental protection expenditures in the business sector are components of a national statistical database on the environment industry.

    Release date: 1999-02-19

  • Table: 53-222-X19950006583
    Description:

    The paper is organized into four sections. The first section introduces the data used for the analysis while the second provides a brief synopsis of the role of trucking in the Canadian economy. The third section contains a summary of the changes that have come about, at least partly, due to deregulation. The fourth section examines changes in trucking activity under the FTA and NAFTA.

    Release date: 1997-06-24
Analysis (31)

Analysis (31) (0 to 10 of 31 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20121875720
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-07-05

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20121795601
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2012024
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper looks at annual changes in Canadian business sector employment from 2001 to 2009. This period encompasses an expansionary phase (2001 to 2008), followed by a recession (2008/2009). Firm-level data are used to decompose yearly net employment change into gross employment creation and destruction, which makes it possible to measure the size of total annual employment reallocation. These measures of employment turnover are compared across industries and firm size classes.

    Release date: 2012-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2012078
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper asks how market expansion contributes to productivity growth. It investigates whether entry to both new international markets and new domestic markets is associated with greater productivity growth. It also examines whether exit from export markets is necessarily associated with deteriorating performance or whether it too can lead to success when associated with movements to new markets. Finally, the paper examines the strategy of firms that move to new markets after they withdraw from export markets in order to examine the differences that set them apart from their counterparts that do not find themselves able to adapt because they simply withdraw to their home domestic markets.

    Release date: 2012-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010063
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines how trade liberalization and fluctuations in real exchange rates affect export-market entry/exit and plant-level productivity. It uses the experience of Canadian manufacturing plants over three separate periods that featuring different rates of bilateral tariff reduction and differing movements in bilateral real exchange rates. The patterns of entry and exit responses as well as the productivity outcomes differ markedly in the three periods. Consistent with much of the recent literature, the paper finds that plants self-select into export markets-that is, more efficient plants are more likely to enter and less likely to exit export markets. The reverse also occurs: entrants to export markets improve their productivity performance relative to the population from which they originated and plants that stay in export markets do better than comparable plants that exited, lending support to the thesis that exporting boosts productivity. Finally, we find that overall market access conditions, including real exchange rate trends, significantly affect the extent of productivity gains to be derived from participating in export markets. In particular, the increase in the value of the Canadian dollar during the post-2002 period almost completely offset the productivity growth advantages that new export-market participants would otherwise have enjoyed.

    Release date: 2010-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010061
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    We examine the simultaneous effects of real-exchange-rate movements and of tariff reductions on plant death in Canadian manufacturing industries between 1979 and 1996. We find that both currency appreciation and tariff cuts increase the probability of plant death, but that tariff reductions have a much greater effect. Consistent with the implications of recent international-trade models involving heterogeneous firms, we further find that the effect of exchange-rate movements and tariff cuts on exit are heterogeneous across plants - particularly pronounced among least efficient plants. Our results reveal multi-dimensional heterogeneity that current models featuring one-dimensional heterogeneity (efficiency differences among plants) cannot fully explain. There are significant and substantial differences between exporters and non-exporters, and between domestic- and foreign- controlled plants. Exporters and foreign-owned plants have much lower failure rates; however, their survival is more sensitive to changes in tariffs and real exchange rates, whether differences in their efficiency levels are controlled or not.

    Release date: 2010-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2008020
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper presents the long-term trends in outsourcing and offshoring across Canadian industries.

    Release date: 2008-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2008055
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper has three main objectives. First, it presents the long-term trends in outsourcing and offshoring across Canadian industries. Second, it examines the relationship between offshoring and changes in trade patterns at the industry level. It focuses on two major drivers that some have suggested are behind the recent trends toward offshoring: globalization and technological changes associated with information and communications technologies. Third, the paper examines the economic impact of offshoring by investigating the relationship between the extent of offshoring and productivity growth, shifts to high value-added activities and changes in labour markets.

    Release date: 2008-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2008054
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The paper investigates how Canadian manufacturing plants adjust to an increase in low-wage import competition by changing their commodity portfolios. At the commodity level, we distinguish between 'core' versus 'peripheral' and differentiated versus homogeneous commodities. We also account for cost and technological complementarities using input-output linkages between commodities produced by a plant. We document large commodity turnover within plants over the period from 1988 to 1996. The largest changes happened in multi-commodity plants and involved peripheral commodities. The commodities that were affected the most were those commodities that are potentially used as inputs in production of the 'core' commodity; homogeneous (rather than differentiated) commodities; and, commodities with relatively weak input complementarities with the core product. Plants experiencing large import competition shifted their output toward production of their core commodity and away from production of unrelated peripheral commodities.

    Release date: 2008-05-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2008052
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Over the past three decades, tariff barriers have fallen significantly, leading to an increasing integration of Canadian manufactures into world markets and especially the U.S. market. Much attention has been paid to the effects of this shift at the national scale, while little attention has been given to whether these effects vary across regions. In a country that spans a continent, there is ample reason to believe that the effects of trade will vary across regions. In particular, location has a significant effect on the size of markets available to firms, and this may impact the extent to which firms reorganize their production in response to falling trade barriers. Utilizing a longitudinal microdata file of manufacturing plants (1974 to 1999), this study tests the effect of higher levels of trade across regions on the organization of production within plants. The study finds that higher levels of export intensity (exports as a share of output) across regions are positively associated with longer production runs, larger plants and product specialization within plants. These effects are strongest in Ontario and Quebec, provinces that are best situated with respect to the U.S. market.

    Release date: 2008-05-09
Reference (5)

Reference (5) ((5 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 96-328-M2004012
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This activity is designed to show students some of the changes affecting Prairie agriculture over the past 100 years, and how Prairie farmers have adapted to them.

    Release date: 2004-08-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 2936
    Description: This survey was sponsored by the Ontario Ministry of Economic Development and Trade.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5001
    Description: This survey is being conducted to measure the extent to which knowledge management practices are used or will be used by Canadian businesses.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5095
    Description: The survey mandate is to collect and benchmark vital information on the business incubator sector of the Canadian economy. The information is critical in assessing the business incubator sector and in developing programs to support them.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5171
    Description: Statistics Canada has undertaken this survey to provide statistical information on the strategic decisions, innovation activities and operational tactics used by Canadian enterprises. The survey also collects information on the involvement of enterprises in global value chains.
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