Business adaptation and adjustment

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Analysis (9)

Analysis (9) ((9 results))

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100064
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic triggered decisions at all levels of government to try and minimize its spread, including shutting down non-essential retail establishments. This led to an abrupt shift in the Canadian retail environment, to which many industries had to adapt. This paper examines the impact of COVID-19 on retail e-commerce as a method of doing business during the first months of the pandemic.

    Release date: 2020-07-24

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202020624983
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2020-07-24

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2020052
    Description:

    This infographic presents the impact of COVID-19 on businesses in Canada and their recovery needs. Specifically, the infographic presents information on teleworking (before, during and after the pandemic), personal protective measures businesses plan to implement, personal protective equipment and supply needs, and actions businesses have taken to help themselves through the pandemic. Results are from the Canadian Survey on Business Conditions.

    Release date: 2020-07-17

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202019623725
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2020-07-14

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202004322583
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2020-02-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020005
    Description:

    Understanding intangible investments is essential for providing accurate measures of gross fixed capital formation (GFCF), gross domestic product (GDP) and productivity growth, and for understanding the innovation system. Statistical agencies need measures of intangible investment to produce economic statistics on aggregate activity that accurately measure concepts such as GDP, GFCF or savings. The levels of GDP, GFCF and savings will be underestimated to the extent that expenditures are incorrectly classified as intermediate inputs that are fully consumed during the period being measured—and not as investments that are not fully consumed during the period when the expenditures are incurred. Estimates for GDP and productivity growth rates may be similarly underestimated. This paper updates and expands upon the intangible capital estimates presented by Baldwin et al. (2009), who extended already measured intangibles (i.e., research and development [R&D], software, mineral exploration) to include additional asset classes consistent with international research on intangible capital measurement (see Corrado, Hulten and Sichel 2009).

    Release date: 2020-02-12

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202001721943
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2020-01-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020001
    Description:

    Multifactor productivity (MFP) declined in Canada from 2000 to 2009 and then recovered after. The movements in productivity since 2000 have attracted great attention from researchers and policy makers because productivity is important both for economic growth and for improvements in living standards. This paper applies the stochastic frontier framework to decompose each firm’s MFP into two parts: its technological frontier and its technical efficiency. Change in the aggregate technological frontier refers to improvements in the productivity potential of an economy, i.e., the maximum productivity of an economy if all firms are fully efficient. Aggregate technical efficiency reflects the economy’s capacity to achieve that potential. The results of this decomposition can show whether the movements in productivity after 2000 in Canada were mainly the result of changes in the technological frontier and productivity potential or of changes in the technical efficiency.

    Release date: 2020-01-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020002
    Description:

    Labour productivity growth in the business sector in Canada started to decline in 2000, from 2.3% per year in the period from 1991 to 2000 to 1.0% per year in the period from 2000 to 2015. This paper examines how innovation, innovation diffusion across firms, and business dynamism affected the productivity slowdown.

    Release date: 2020-01-17
Reference (4)

Reference (4) ((4 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 2936
    Description: This survey was sponsored by the Ontario Ministry of Economic Development and Trade.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5001
    Description: This survey is being conducted to measure the extent to which knowledge management practices are used or will be used by Canadian businesses.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5095
    Description: The survey mandate is to collect and benchmark vital information on the business incubator sector of the Canadian economy. The information is critical in assessing the business incubator sector and in developing programs to support them.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5171
    Description: Statistics Canada has undertaken this survey to provide statistical information on the strategic decisions, innovation activities and operational tactics used by Canadian enterprises. The survey also collects information on the involvement of enterprises in global value chains.
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