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All (125) (0 to 10 of 125 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020006
    Description:

    This paper examines the role of firm characteristics in accounting for the between-firm average employment earnings dispersion in the Canadian business sector between 2002 and 2015. It uses two decomposition methods to analyze the level of and changes in the between-firm average employment earnings dispersion by firm characteristics, such as productivity, globalization status (importing, exporting, foreign ownership), technology intensity, firm size, firm age, industry and geographic region.

    Release date: 2020-02-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020001
    Description:

    Multifactor productivity (MFP) declined in Canada from 2000 to 2009 and then recovered after. The movements in productivity since 2000 have attracted great attention from researchers and policy makers because productivity is important both for economic growth and for improvements in living standards. This paper applies the stochastic frontier framework to decompose each firm’s MFP into two parts: its technological frontier and its technical efficiency. Change in the aggregate technological frontier refers to improvements in the productivity potential of an economy, i.e., the maximum productivity of an economy if all firms are fully efficient. Aggregate technical efficiency reflects the economy’s capacity to achieve that potential. The results of this decomposition can show whether the movements in productivity after 2000 in Canada were mainly the result of changes in the technological frontier and productivity potential or of changes in the technical efficiency.

    Release date: 2020-01-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020002
    Description:

    Labour productivity growth in the business sector in Canada started to decline in 2000, from 2.3% per year in the period from 1991 to 2000 to 1.0% per year in the period from 2000 to 2015. This paper examines how innovation, innovation diffusion across firms, and business dynamism affected the productivity slowdown.

    Release date: 2020-01-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 13-016-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This publication presents an overview of recent economic developments in the provinces and territories. The overview covers several broad areas: 1) gross domestic product (GDP) by income and by expenditure, 2) GDP by industry, 3) labour productivity and other related variables.

    The publication examines trends in the major aggregates that comprise GDP, both income- and expenditure-based, as well as prices and the financing of economic activity by institutional sector. GDP is also examined by industry. The productivity estimates are meant to assist in the analysis of the short-run relationship among the fluctuations of output, employment, compensation and hours worked. Some issues also contain more technical articles, explaining national accounts methodology or analysing a particular aspect of the economy.

    This publication carries the detailed analyses, charts and statistical tables that, prior to its first issue, were released in The Daily (11-001-XIE) under the headings Provincial Economic Accounts and Provincial Gross Domestic Product by industry.

    Release date: 2018-11-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018409
    Description:

    Labour productivity growth and multifactor productivity (MFP) growth slowed in Canada and other advanced economies after 2000. Several measurement challenges have been suggested as potential explanations for this trend. These include the measurement of intangible capital in a digital economy, the measurement of natural resource capital in the resource extraction sectors, the effect of infrastructure capital and the effect of cyclical fluctuations in the utilization of capital in industries adversely affected by world demand. This paper focuses on the role of these measurement issues in the slower productivity growth observed in Canada.

    Release date: 2018-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2016099
    Description:

    This review analyzes the performance of the wholesale trade sector nationally and regionally, along with key factors affecting the 2015 trends. Wholesale sales are examined at the subsector and industry level along with other relevant variables. This study also includes provincial wholesale sales.

    Release date: 2016-09-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016373
    Description:

    This paper examines how much of the slowdown in productivity growth observed in Canada’s business sector between the 1990s (1990 to 1999) and the 2000s (2000 to 2014) was due to weaker productivity growth within industries and how much was due to structural adjustment. The analysis makes use of a decomposition method that differs from many of the standard labour productivity decomposition approaches commonly found in the literature and allows the contributions of changes in the importance of individual industries to be calculated.

    Release date: 2016-06-13

  • Table: 13-010-X
    Description:

    This publication presents an overview of the economic developments reported in Canada's national accounts for the most recent quarter, and is no longer being released. The overview covers several broad areas: 1) gross domestic product (GDP) by income and by expenditure; 2) GDP by industry; 3) balance of international payments accounts; 4) labour productivity and other related variables; 5) international investment position; and, 6) national balance sheet accounts.

    Release date: 2015-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2014038
    Description:

    This paper provides an overview of the productivity program at Statistics Canada and a brief description of Canada’s productivity performance. The paper defines productivity and the various measures that are used to investigate different aspects of productivity growth. It describes the difference between partial productivity measures (such as labour productivity) and a more complete measure (multifactor productivity) and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The paper explains why productivity is important. It outlines how productivity growth fits into the growth accounting framework and how this framework is used to examine the various sources of economic growth. The paper briefly discusses the challenges that face statisticians in measuring productivity growth. It also provides an overview of Canada’s long-term productivity performance and compares Canada to the United States—both in terms of productivity levels and productivity growth rates.

    Release date: 2014-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2014035
    Description:

    This paper highlights revisions to multifactor productivity (MFP) growth and related variables in the business sector and in individual industries, which resulted from the historical revision of the Canadian System of National Accounts (CSNA) released October 1, 2012, revisions to the labour productivity accounts released October 12, 2012, and changes in the estimation of capital input that were made in order to improve its consistency in industry MFP growth estimates.

    The multifactor productivity program produces indexes of MFP and related measures (output, capital input, labour input and intermediate inputs) for the business sector, broad economic sub-sectors, and their constituent industries. The MFP program divides growth in labour productivity into its key determinants: capital intensity (changes in capital per hour worked), investment in human capital, and MFP, which includes technological change, organizational innovation and economies of scale.

    Release date: 2014-07-08
Data (5)

Data (5) ((5 results))

  • Table: 13-010-X
    Description:

    This publication presents an overview of the economic developments reported in Canada's national accounts for the most recent quarter, and is no longer being released. The overview covers several broad areas: 1) gross domestic product (GDP) by income and by expenditure; 2) GDP by industry; 3) balance of international payments accounts; 4) labour productivity and other related variables; 5) international investment position; and, 6) national balance sheet accounts.

    Release date: 2015-06-12

  • Table: 51-004-X2009006
    Description:

    This publication provides quarterly information on operational and financial variables related to the scheduled and charter operations of all Canadian-licensed air carriers classified into reporting levels I and II. Operational data (passengers, passenger-kilometres, goods carried, goods tonne-kilometres, etc.) and financial data (operating revenues, operating expenses, employment expenses) are presented. This publication also includes data highlights and some financial performance indicators and productivity measures.

    Release date: 2009-11-13

  • Table: 51-004-X2009003
    Description:

    This publication provides annual information on operational and financial variables related to the scheduled and charter operations of all Canadian-licensed air carriers classified into reporting levels I to III. Operational data (passengers, passenger-kilometres, goods carried, goods tonne-kilometres, etc.) and financial data (income statement-operating revenues, operating expenses, non-operating income (expenses), balance sheet-assets and liabilities, as well as financial performance indicators) are presented. Information on fuel, on employment, by category, and on wages and salaries paid, by province and territory is also provided. This publication also includes data highlights.

    Release date: 2009-07-03

  • Table: 51-004-X2009001
    Description:

    This publication provides quarterly information on operational and financial variables related to the scheduled and charter operations of all Canadian-licensed air carriers classified into reporting levels I and II. Operational data (passengers, passenger-kilometres, goods carried, goods tonne-kilometres, etc.) and financial data (operating revenues, operating expenses, employment expenses) are presented. This publication also includes data highlights and some financial performance indicators and productivity measures.

    Release date: 2009-03-09

  • Table: 15-003-X
    Description:

    The Canadian Productivity Accounts: Data is an electronic publication that contains a series of tables on productivity growth and related variables for the business sector and its 51 major sub-sectors based on the North American Industry Classification System. These tables allow users to have a broader perspective on Canadian economic performance. They complement the information available on CANSIM which offers more detail, particularly at the industry level.

    Canadian Productivity Accounts (CPA) are responsible for producing, analyzing and disseminating Statistics Canada's official data on productivity and for producing and integrating data on employment, hours worked and capital services consistent with the Canadian System of National Accounts. To this end, the CPA comprise three programs. The quarterly program provides current estimates on labour productivity and labour costs at the aggregate level for 15 industry groups. The annual national program provides yearly estimates on labour productivity, multifactor productivity and several indicators of sources of growth and competitiveness as they apply to the major sectors of the economy and to the industry level. Lastly, the annual provincial program, as an integral part of the Provincial Economic Accounts, provides estimates on employment, hours worked, labour productivity and labour costs at the industry level for each province and territory.

    The Canadian Productivity Accounts: Data covers four series of statistical tables:

    Table 1: Output, labour compensation, capital cost and cost of intermediate inputs in current dollars

    Table 2: Productivity and related measures

    Table 3: Productivity and related measures for the business sector, Canada and United States

    Table 4: Productivity and related measures for the manufacturing sector, Canada and United States

    Productivity measures the efficiency with which inputs (labour and capital in particular) are utilized in production. Productivity measures can be applied to a single input, such as labour productivity (output per hour worked), as well as to multifactor productivity (output per unit of combined labour and capital inputs). Statistics Canada produces these two main measures of productivity, but other productivity ratios can also be measured (e.g., output per unit of capital services).

    Release date: 2007-12-06
Analysis (107)

Analysis (107) (0 to 10 of 107 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020006
    Description:

    This paper examines the role of firm characteristics in accounting for the between-firm average employment earnings dispersion in the Canadian business sector between 2002 and 2015. It uses two decomposition methods to analyze the level of and changes in the between-firm average employment earnings dispersion by firm characteristics, such as productivity, globalization status (importing, exporting, foreign ownership), technology intensity, firm size, firm age, industry and geographic region.

    Release date: 2020-02-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020001
    Description:

    Multifactor productivity (MFP) declined in Canada from 2000 to 2009 and then recovered after. The movements in productivity since 2000 have attracted great attention from researchers and policy makers because productivity is important both for economic growth and for improvements in living standards. This paper applies the stochastic frontier framework to decompose each firm’s MFP into two parts: its technological frontier and its technical efficiency. Change in the aggregate technological frontier refers to improvements in the productivity potential of an economy, i.e., the maximum productivity of an economy if all firms are fully efficient. Aggregate technical efficiency reflects the economy’s capacity to achieve that potential. The results of this decomposition can show whether the movements in productivity after 2000 in Canada were mainly the result of changes in the technological frontier and productivity potential or of changes in the technical efficiency.

    Release date: 2020-01-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020002
    Description:

    Labour productivity growth in the business sector in Canada started to decline in 2000, from 2.3% per year in the period from 1991 to 2000 to 1.0% per year in the period from 2000 to 2015. This paper examines how innovation, innovation diffusion across firms, and business dynamism affected the productivity slowdown.

    Release date: 2020-01-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 13-016-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This publication presents an overview of recent economic developments in the provinces and territories. The overview covers several broad areas: 1) gross domestic product (GDP) by income and by expenditure, 2) GDP by industry, 3) labour productivity and other related variables.

    The publication examines trends in the major aggregates that comprise GDP, both income- and expenditure-based, as well as prices and the financing of economic activity by institutional sector. GDP is also examined by industry. The productivity estimates are meant to assist in the analysis of the short-run relationship among the fluctuations of output, employment, compensation and hours worked. Some issues also contain more technical articles, explaining national accounts methodology or analysing a particular aspect of the economy.

    This publication carries the detailed analyses, charts and statistical tables that, prior to its first issue, were released in The Daily (11-001-XIE) under the headings Provincial Economic Accounts and Provincial Gross Domestic Product by industry.

    Release date: 2018-11-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018409
    Description:

    Labour productivity growth and multifactor productivity (MFP) growth slowed in Canada and other advanced economies after 2000. Several measurement challenges have been suggested as potential explanations for this trend. These include the measurement of intangible capital in a digital economy, the measurement of natural resource capital in the resource extraction sectors, the effect of infrastructure capital and the effect of cyclical fluctuations in the utilization of capital in industries adversely affected by world demand. This paper focuses on the role of these measurement issues in the slower productivity growth observed in Canada.

    Release date: 2018-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2016099
    Description:

    This review analyzes the performance of the wholesale trade sector nationally and regionally, along with key factors affecting the 2015 trends. Wholesale sales are examined at the subsector and industry level along with other relevant variables. This study also includes provincial wholesale sales.

    Release date: 2016-09-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016373
    Description:

    This paper examines how much of the slowdown in productivity growth observed in Canada’s business sector between the 1990s (1990 to 1999) and the 2000s (2000 to 2014) was due to weaker productivity growth within industries and how much was due to structural adjustment. The analysis makes use of a decomposition method that differs from many of the standard labour productivity decomposition approaches commonly found in the literature and allows the contributions of changes in the importance of individual industries to be calculated.

    Release date: 2016-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2014038
    Description:

    This paper provides an overview of the productivity program at Statistics Canada and a brief description of Canada’s productivity performance. The paper defines productivity and the various measures that are used to investigate different aspects of productivity growth. It describes the difference between partial productivity measures (such as labour productivity) and a more complete measure (multifactor productivity) and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The paper explains why productivity is important. It outlines how productivity growth fits into the growth accounting framework and how this framework is used to examine the various sources of economic growth. The paper briefly discusses the challenges that face statisticians in measuring productivity growth. It also provides an overview of Canada’s long-term productivity performance and compares Canada to the United States—both in terms of productivity levels and productivity growth rates.

    Release date: 2014-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2014035
    Description:

    This paper highlights revisions to multifactor productivity (MFP) growth and related variables in the business sector and in individual industries, which resulted from the historical revision of the Canadian System of National Accounts (CSNA) released October 1, 2012, revisions to the labour productivity accounts released October 12, 2012, and changes in the estimation of capital input that were made in order to improve its consistency in industry MFP growth estimates.

    The multifactor productivity program produces indexes of MFP and related measures (output, capital input, labour input and intermediate inputs) for the business sector, broad economic sub-sectors, and their constituent industries. The MFP program divides growth in labour productivity into its key determinants: capital intensity (changes in capital per hour worked), investment in human capital, and MFP, which includes technological change, organizational innovation and economies of scale.

    Release date: 2014-07-08

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2014033
    Description:

    This paper examines and compares labour productivity in Canada and the United States for small and large firms over the period from 2002 to 2008. It quantifies the relative importance of small and large firms in Canada and the United States and measures the relative productivity levels of small versus large firms.

    Small firms are relatively more important in the Canadian economy. Small firms are less productive than large firms in both countries. But the productivity disadvantage of small relative to large firms was higher in Canada.

    The paper provides an estimate of the impact that these differences have on the gap in productivity levels between Canada and the United States. It first estimates the changes that would occur in Canadian aggregate labour productivity if the share of hours worked of large firms in Canada was increased to the U.S. level. It then quantifies the impact of increasing the relative productivity of small to large firms in Canada up to the relative productivity ratio of small firms to large firms that existed in the United States.

    Together, decreasing the relative importance of small firms in the economy and increasing their relative productivity compared to large firms accounts for most of the gap in productivity levels between Canada and the United States in 2002. However, changes in the economy that occurred between 2002 and 2008 reduced the contribution of the small-firm sector to the gap in productivity levels.

    Release date: 2014-01-08
Reference (13)

Reference (13) (0 to 10 of 13 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-206-X2013031
    Description:

    This paper describes the evolution of the Multifactor Productivity Program launched at Statistics Canada in 1987 and the improvements made in multifactor productivity measurement since then. The improvements were made in response to developments in the economic literature, better data sources, and the needs of the user community. The paper also summarizes research that uses alternate data and methodologies to assess the accuracy of the Multifactor Productivity Program and to provide insights into areas that traditional international multifactor productivity programs omit. Finally, the paper outlines future directions that are being contemplated to further improve the measurement of productivity at Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2013-05-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13-605-X201200311728
    Description:

    This report highlights the revisions to the quarterly estimates of labour productivity and associated variables in the business sector resulting from the historical revision of the national gross domestic product by income and by expenditure accounts (NIEA) released on October 1st, 2012.

    Release date: 2012-10-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-206-X2008016
    Description:

    This paper focuses on the role of investments in infrastructure in Canada. The size of infrastructure investments relative to other capital stock sets this country apart from most other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries. The paper reviews the approaches taken by other researchers to define infrastructure. It then outlines a taxonomy to define those assets that should be considered as infrastructure and that can be used to assess the importance of different types of capital investments. It briefly considers how to define the portion of infrastructure that should be considered 'public'. The final two parts of the paper apply the proposed classification system to data on Canada's capital stock, and ask the following questions: how much infrastructure does Canada have and in which sectors of the economy is this infrastructure located? Finally, the paper investigates how Canada's infrastructure has evolved over the last four decades, both in the commercial and non-commercial sectors, and compares these trends with the pattern that can be found in the United States.

    Release date: 2008-03-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-206-X2008017
    Description:

    This paper provides an overview of the productivity program at Statistics Canada and a brief description of Canada's productivity performance. The paper defines productivity and the various measures that are used to investigate different aspects of productivity growth. It describes the difference between partial productivity measures (such as labour productivity) and a more complete measure (multifactor productivity) and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The paper explains why productivity is important. It outlines how productivity growth fits into the growth accounting framework and how this framework is used to examine the various sources of economic growth. The paper briefly discusses the challenges that face statisticians in measuring productivity growth. It also provides an overview of Canada's long-term productivity performance and compares Canada to the United States - both in terms of productivity levels and productivity growth rates.

    Release date: 2008-02-25

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-206-X2007012
    Description:

    This paper examines the various products associated with the quarterly labour productivity program. It outlines the nature of the volatility in the very short-run estimates and examines properties of the revisions made to the estimates of Canadian labour productivity and its components (gross domestic product and hours worked) since the inception of the program in 2001.

    Release date: 2007-10-18

  • Notices and consultations: 11-015-X
    Description:

    This newsletter is a brief description of projects within the Business and Labour Market Analysis Division of Statistics Canada. The research covers a wide range of topics including labour market issues, low income, immigration, business firm dynamics, pensions, productivity, technology and innovation, as well as economic geography.

    Release date: 2007-09-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-206-X2006004
    Description:

    This paper provides a brief description of the methodology currently used to produce the annual volume of hours worked consistent with the System of National Accounts (SNA). These data are used for labour input in the annual and quarterly measures of labour productivity, as well as in the annual measures of multifactor productivity. For this purpose, hours worked are broken down by educational level and age group, so that changes in the composition of the labour force can be taken into account. They are also used to calculate hourly compensation and the unit labour cost and for simulations of the SNA Input-Output Model; as such, they are integrated as labour force inputs into most SNA satellite accounts (i.e., environment, tourism).

    Release date: 2006-10-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-206-X2006003
    Description:

    This paper examines the revision cycle for labour productivity estimates over the period 2001 to 2004.

    Release date: 2006-10-11

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-206-X2006002
    Description:

    This paper provides a concise overview in plain language of the concept of productivity by explaining its relevance and usefulness. This paper is intended for users of the Canadian Productivity Accounts who wish to learn more about productivity concepts, in simple terms.

    Release date: 2006-04-21

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11F0026M2005005
    Description:

    The aim of this paper is to describe the actual methodology used to estimate annual hours worked by industry and province in Canada in view to be consistent with the System of National Accounts.

    Release date: 2005-08-30
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