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All (5)

All (5) ((5 results))

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100600004
    Description:

    Recent advances in artificial intelligence and robotics have led to a higher risk of job loss or job transformation among certain groups of workers. Moreover, the COVID-19 pandemic has shown that workers whose job can be done from home, involves sufficient physical distancing, or is deemed essential by authorities enjoy greater job security than other workers during a lockdown. In light of these two developments, it is important to identify which groups of Canadian workers might enjoy the highest or lowest level of job security in upcoming years. To do so, this study develops a forward-looking measure of job security by estimating the proportion of Canadian employees who hold ‘triple-protected’ jobs, or jobs that (a) have no predetermined end date; (b) have a low risk of being lost or transformed due to automation; and (c) are resilient to pandemics.

    Release date: 2021-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020025
    Description:

    Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, advances in artificial intelligence and robotics raised concerns that automation might lead to relatively high unemployment rates in the coming years. This Economic Insights article examines the degree to which Canadians’ views about the impact of automation on net job creation in 1989 materialized three decades later.

    Release date: 2020-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2020004
    Description:

    Recent advances in artificial intelligence have rekindled ancient fears that robots will replace humans in the economy. Previous waves of automation changed but did not reduce labour’s role, but robots’ human-like flexibility could make this time different. Whether or not it will is an empirical question that has lacked suitable data to answer. This paper describes the creation of a dataset to fill the evidence gap in Canada. Robots! is firm-level panel data on robot adoption created using Canadian import data. The data identify a substantial amount of the robot investment in the Canadian economy from 1996 to 2017. Although many robots are imported by robotics wholesalers or programmers for resale, the majority of them can be attributed to their final (direct) adopting firm. The data can be used to study the impact of robot adoption at the economic region, industry or firm-level.

    Release date: 2020-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020017
    Description:

    This study examines how employment and organizations have changed in response to robot adoption. As robotics and artificial intelligence (AI) become increasingly used by firms as the next engine of innovation and productivity growth, their effects on labour, firm practices and productivity have become a subject of growing importance. The study provides the most comprehensive evidence possible at the level of individual businesses on the employment and organizational effects of robot investments.

    Release date: 2020-11-02

  • Thematic map: 95-634-X201700154903
    Description:

    This second set of thematic maps, based on the 2016 Census of Agriculture data, present the following theme: land use, land tenure and management practices. It includes maps about land use, land tenure, agricultural practices, land inputs, technologies used on the operation and renewable energy production on the operation.

    Release date: 2018-01-25
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Thematic map: 95-634-X201700154903
    Description:

    This second set of thematic maps, based on the 2016 Census of Agriculture data, present the following theme: land use, land tenure and management practices. It includes maps about land use, land tenure, agricultural practices, land inputs, technologies used on the operation and renewable energy production on the operation.

    Release date: 2018-01-25
Analysis (4)

Analysis (4) ((4 results))

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100600004
    Description:

    Recent advances in artificial intelligence and robotics have led to a higher risk of job loss or job transformation among certain groups of workers. Moreover, the COVID-19 pandemic has shown that workers whose job can be done from home, involves sufficient physical distancing, or is deemed essential by authorities enjoy greater job security than other workers during a lockdown. In light of these two developments, it is important to identify which groups of Canadian workers might enjoy the highest or lowest level of job security in upcoming years. To do so, this study develops a forward-looking measure of job security by estimating the proportion of Canadian employees who hold ‘triple-protected’ jobs, or jobs that (a) have no predetermined end date; (b) have a low risk of being lost or transformed due to automation; and (c) are resilient to pandemics.

    Release date: 2021-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020025
    Description:

    Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, advances in artificial intelligence and robotics raised concerns that automation might lead to relatively high unemployment rates in the coming years. This Economic Insights article examines the degree to which Canadians’ views about the impact of automation on net job creation in 1989 materialized three decades later.

    Release date: 2020-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2020004
    Description:

    Recent advances in artificial intelligence have rekindled ancient fears that robots will replace humans in the economy. Previous waves of automation changed but did not reduce labour’s role, but robots’ human-like flexibility could make this time different. Whether or not it will is an empirical question that has lacked suitable data to answer. This paper describes the creation of a dataset to fill the evidence gap in Canada. Robots! is firm-level panel data on robot adoption created using Canadian import data. The data identify a substantial amount of the robot investment in the Canadian economy from 1996 to 2017. Although many robots are imported by robotics wholesalers or programmers for resale, the majority of them can be attributed to their final (direct) adopting firm. The data can be used to study the impact of robot adoption at the economic region, industry or firm-level.

    Release date: 2020-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020017
    Description:

    This study examines how employment and organizations have changed in response to robot adoption. As robotics and artificial intelligence (AI) become increasingly used by firms as the next engine of innovation and productivity growth, their effects on labour, firm practices and productivity have become a subject of growing importance. The study provides the most comprehensive evidence possible at the level of individual businesses on the employment and organizational effects of robot investments.

    Release date: 2020-11-02
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