Field of study

Key indicators

Selected geographical area: Canada

More field of study indicators

Selected geographical area: Canada

Selected geographical area: Newfoundland and Labrador

More field of study indicators

Selected geographical area: Newfoundland and Labrador

Selected geographical area: Prince Edward Island

More field of study indicators

Selected geographical area: Prince Edward Island

Selected geographical area: Nova Scotia

More field of study indicators

Selected geographical area: Nova Scotia

Selected geographical area: New Brunswick

More field of study indicators

Selected geographical area: New Brunswick

Selected geographical area: Quebec

More field of study indicators

Selected geographical area: Quebec

Selected geographical area: Ontario

More field of study indicators

Selected geographical area: Ontario

Selected geographical area: Manitoba

More field of study indicators

Selected geographical area: Manitoba

Selected geographical area: Saskatchewan

More field of study indicators

Selected geographical area: Saskatchewan

Selected geographical area: Alberta

More field of study indicators

Selected geographical area: Alberta

Selected geographical area: British Columbia

More field of study indicators

Selected geographical area: British Columbia

Selected geographical area: Yukon

More field of study indicators

Selected geographical area: Yukon

Selected geographical area: Northwest Territories

More field of study indicators

Selected geographical area: Northwest Territories

Selected geographical area: Nunavut

More field of study indicators

Selected geographical area: Nunavut

Sort Help

Results

All (172)

All (172) (0 to 10 of 172 results)

Data (142)

Data (142) (0 to 10 of 142 results)

Analysis (26)

Analysis (26) (0 to 10 of 26 results)

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2016023
    Description:

    This Census in Brief article compares the earnings of young bachelor’s degree holders from different fields of study, including STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields, and BHASE (non-STEM) fields, such as business, humanities, health, arts, social science and education.

    Release date: 2017-11-29

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2016025
    Description:

    This Census in Brief article examines the jobs of young bachelor’s degree holders and identifies how field of study is associated with occupational outcomes. It shows how graduates from a given field of study are distributed across broad occupational groups and how overqualification rates differ by field.

    Release date: 2017-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114640
    Description:

    Women have become increasingly well-educated, and today their share in the Canadian labour market is larger than ever. This chapter of Women in Canada examines women’s educational experiences, with a focus on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics and computer science) education and skills. Topics include a profile of women’s education in Canada, the skills of young girls and women, field-of-study patterns at the postsecondary level, and labour market outcomes, including earnings.

    Release date: 2016-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016056
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents age-adjusted mean earnings by detailed field of study among 25- to 54-year-old university and college graduates who worked full year, full time in 2010. The data are drawn from the 2011 National Household Survey.

    Release date: 2016-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111874
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Women represent the majority of young university graduates, but are still underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and computer sciences (STEM) fields. This article provides more information on women with STEM university degrees, and examines whether mathematical abilities in high school are related to gender differences in STEM university programs.

    Release date: 2013-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2013100
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Past research has revealed that young women are more likely to enter postsecondary programs that have lower returns in the labour market, such as the arts, humanities and social sciences. Young men, conversely, tend to enrol in and graduate from programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), which generally have greater labour market returns. Factors such as academic interests, achievement test scores, and high-school marks can affect later university program choice. Using the linked Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) - Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) data, the current paper examines the relationship between mathematics and science test scores at age 15 and first program choice in university, with a focus on differences in ability in mathematics and science by gender. Generally speaking, the results reveal that the intersection of gender and ability does matter; even young women of high mathematical ability are less likely to enter STEM fields than young men of similar or even lesser mathematical ability. This implies that something other than pure ability is affecting young women's likelihood of entering STEM programs in university.

    Release date: 2013-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 99-012-X2011001
    Description:

    This National Household Survey analytical document presents key results from the analysis of data on education in Canada in 2011. The analysis focuses on the highest certificate, diploma or degree, the field of study and the location of study for the population aged 25 to 64 years for various levels of geography, including Canada, the provinces and territories, and the census metropolitan areas (CMAs).

    Release date: 2013-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201000611405
    Description:

    This article uses data from the Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS) to draw a portrait of the changing make-up of international students enrolled in Canadian universities on either a part-time or full-time basis over the 1992 to 2008 period. This portrait shows how different international students are today compared to their counterparts in the early 1990s by examining changes that are evident in their university program levels and fields of study, age and gender composition, source countries and destinations within Canada.

    Release date: 2011-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201000111151
    Description:

    The situation of women in Canadian society and in the labour market has undergone a massive shift over the past few decades. Women now account for the majority of university graduates; the gender gap in labour market participation in 2009 narrowed to a small fraction of its size in 1976; and increasingly, women are found in non-traditional occupations and fields of study. That being said, there still are many occupations that reflect historical gender roles. That is because fundamental societal shifts like these typically take place over an extended period of time, reflecting changes in behaviours of successive cohorts of young people.

    This article takes stock of changes that have taken place over time in the occupations held by women in the labour market and in the fields of study they are choosing at the postsecondary level. It demonstrates where changes have occurred and suggests where change may happen in future as a result of shifts in the composition of postsecondary education graduates.

    Release date: 2010-04-29

  • Stats in brief: 81-600-X2009001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is one of four fact sheets in a series using Statistics Canada data sources relating to the education and training of workers in health and related occupations. Using the 2005 National Graduates Survey (NGS) (Class of 2000), this fact sheet provides information on the proportion of new health graduates entering health professions during the five years following graduation and on the proportion finding employment in other sectors of the economy.

    Release date: 2009-05-01
Reference (4)

Reference (4) ((4 results))

  • Classification: 12-590-X
    Description:

    The Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) is used for classifying instructional programs according to field of study. CIP was originally created by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) in the United States. It is a hierarchical classification. CIP Canada is the adaptation of this classification for use in Canada. CIP Canada 2016 is made up of 49 2-digit series, 387 4-digit subseries and 1,689 6-digit instructional program classes. The classification provides a detailed description of each instructional program class together with illustrative examples of the types of instructional programs found in that class. Illustrative examples are also provided of closely related programs that are classified elsewhere. In addition, the classification includes an introduction to CIP and an alternative structure for the aggregation of field of study data. CIP has a ten-year revision cycle.

    Release date: 2016-08-03

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-005-X
    Description:

    This register identifies the universe of all public and not-for-profit postsecondary and adult education institutions in Canada and their programs of study. All programs are classified to the Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP).

    Release date: 2004-12-13

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-392-G
    Description:

    This guide presents the census concepts related to schooling and major field of study and describes the evolution of the different issues that concern these concepts. The guide also deals with the comparability of the 2001 Census data on schooling and major field of study with those of previous censuses.

    Release date: 2004-11-23

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1995002
    Description:

    This paper presents the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) coding structure for the major fields of study for postsecondary graduates. It uses data collected in the 1991 Census of Population.

    Release date: 1995-12-30
Date modified: