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All (12)

All (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

  • Stats in brief: 89-28-0001201800100014
    Description:

    This edition presents demographic and family background information on the school-age population as well as measures of student performance in reading, math and science as measured by the 2015 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the 2016 Pan-Canadian Assessment Program (PCAP).

    Release date: 2019-09-18

  • Stats in brief: 81-599-X2018012
    Description:

    This fact sheet explores the education and labour market situation of young Canadians aged 15 to 19. In this paper we find that:

    The proportion of 15 to 19 year old Canadians who are not in employment, education or training (NEET) has fallen over time.

    In general, countries with lower NEET rates for this age group tend to have a higher typical age of high school graduation.

    The 15 to 19 year old group is a heterogeneous one with younger Canadians aged 15 and 16 being much more likely to be in school and older youth in this group starting their first transition to postsecondary education or the labour market.

    There was very little provincial variation in terms of NEET rates that was statistically significant in 2016.

    Release date: 2018-02-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2010081
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    International comparisons show that the percentage of both college- and university-educated workers who earn less than half of the median employment income is higher than in Canada than in most, if not all, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. Data from Statistics Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) show that 18% of university-educated adults and 23% of college-educated adults aged 25 to 64 in Canada earned less than half the national median employment income in 2006.

    This study uses descriptive statistics and logistic regression techniques in order to shed light on the type of highly educated worker who is likely to fall into lower employment earnings, taking into account a range of characteristics, including age, sex, field of study, occupation and industry. While all of the workers in the study population had non-zero employment earnings, many of them reported an activity other than working as their main activity for the year, a key factor in explaining their low-earnings situation. Other factors associated with having a college or university education while also having low employment earnings include being self-employed, working in certain occupations or industries and being female.

    Release date: 2010-04-21

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008014
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This research paper explores youth delinquency using data from the International Youth Survey as self-reported by Toronto youth in 2006. In particular, the study examines how the associations between youth delinquency and age, sex, family composition and generational status are affected by factors related to school, victimization and family and friends. Detailed findings are presented for both property and violent delinquency.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007303
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this study, we use new Canadian data containing detailed information on standardized test scores, school marks, parental and peer influences, and other socio-economic background characteristics of boys and girls to try to account for the large gender gap in university attendance. Among 19-year-old youth in 2003, 38.8% of girls had attended university, compared with only 25.7% of boys. However, young men and women were about equally likely to attend college. We find that differences in observable characteristics between boys and girls account for more than three quarters (76.8%) of the gap in university participation. In order of importance, the main factors are differences in school marks at age 15, standardized test scores in reading at age 15, study habits, parental expectations and the university earnings premium relative to high school. Altogether, the four measures of academic abilities used in the study "overall marks, performance on standardized reading tests, study habits and repeating grade" collectively account for 58.9% of the gender gap in university participation. These results suggest that understanding why girls outperform boys in the classroom may be a key to understanding the gender divide in university participation.

    Release date: 2007-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20070029989
    Description:

    Between the ages of 15 and 19, youth have three decisions to make: first, whether or not to graduate from high school; second, whether or not to go to postsecondary education; and finally, the type of institution in which to pursue that postsecondary education. Using data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), this article examines these pathways to see if there are any differences between the provinces in the choices made by boys versus girls and by youth from lower-income backgrounds versus those from higher-income backgrounds. The target population for the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), cohort A includes all 15 year-old students enrolled in an educational institution in Canada on December 31, 1999. Students were initially interviewed in April or May of 2000 and re-interviewed in February to May of 2002 and again, between February and June of 2004. Youth were questioned about their school and work activities for the two-year period directly prior to the interview date. Thus, the high school dropout and postsecondary participation rates presented here refer to the youth's schooling status as of December 2003, the last date for which data were collected. These results are representative of Canadian youth who were 15 years old as of December 1999.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060059589
    Description:

    In an increasingly knowledge-based economy, the key to equity in economic opportunity lies in equity in access to a university education. Attending university is a costly undertaking. One aspect of the costs is distance, for the many who do not live within commuting distance of a university. Using census data, a new study looks at the impact the creation of seven new universities : in British Columbia, Newfoundland and Nova Scotia : in the last 25 years has had on university attendance of local youth. The impact is positive, but not shared equally among all youth.

    Release date: 2007-02-26

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004026
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report examines factors related to entering college or university as well as to leaving postsecondary education prior to completion.

    Release date: 2004-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report looks at high school completion, postsecondary participation and labour market activities of people aged 20 to 22 years. It uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey.

    Release date: 2004-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20010046203
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines characteristics of the specialized design services industry. It also provides a 1999 snapshot of the design industry's five subindustries: landscape architecture, interior design, industrial design, graphic design and other design services.

    Release date: 2002-06-19
Stats in brief (2)

Stats in brief (2) ((2 results))

  • Stats in brief: 89-28-0001201800100014
    Description:

    This edition presents demographic and family background information on the school-age population as well as measures of student performance in reading, math and science as measured by the 2015 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the 2016 Pan-Canadian Assessment Program (PCAP).

    Release date: 2019-09-18

  • Stats in brief: 81-599-X2018012
    Description:

    This fact sheet explores the education and labour market situation of young Canadians aged 15 to 19. In this paper we find that:

    The proportion of 15 to 19 year old Canadians who are not in employment, education or training (NEET) has fallen over time.

    In general, countries with lower NEET rates for this age group tend to have a higher typical age of high school graduation.

    The 15 to 19 year old group is a heterogeneous one with younger Canadians aged 15 and 16 being much more likely to be in school and older youth in this group starting their first transition to postsecondary education or the labour market.

    There was very little provincial variation in terms of NEET rates that was statistically significant in 2016.

    Release date: 2018-02-22
Articles and reports (10)

Articles and reports (10) ((10 results))

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2010081
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    International comparisons show that the percentage of both college- and university-educated workers who earn less than half of the median employment income is higher than in Canada than in most, if not all, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. Data from Statistics Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) show that 18% of university-educated adults and 23% of college-educated adults aged 25 to 64 in Canada earned less than half the national median employment income in 2006.

    This study uses descriptive statistics and logistic regression techniques in order to shed light on the type of highly educated worker who is likely to fall into lower employment earnings, taking into account a range of characteristics, including age, sex, field of study, occupation and industry. While all of the workers in the study population had non-zero employment earnings, many of them reported an activity other than working as their main activity for the year, a key factor in explaining their low-earnings situation. Other factors associated with having a college or university education while also having low employment earnings include being self-employed, working in certain occupations or industries and being female.

    Release date: 2010-04-21

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008014
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This research paper explores youth delinquency using data from the International Youth Survey as self-reported by Toronto youth in 2006. In particular, the study examines how the associations between youth delinquency and age, sex, family composition and generational status are affected by factors related to school, victimization and family and friends. Detailed findings are presented for both property and violent delinquency.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007303
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this study, we use new Canadian data containing detailed information on standardized test scores, school marks, parental and peer influences, and other socio-economic background characteristics of boys and girls to try to account for the large gender gap in university attendance. Among 19-year-old youth in 2003, 38.8% of girls had attended university, compared with only 25.7% of boys. However, young men and women were about equally likely to attend college. We find that differences in observable characteristics between boys and girls account for more than three quarters (76.8%) of the gap in university participation. In order of importance, the main factors are differences in school marks at age 15, standardized test scores in reading at age 15, study habits, parental expectations and the university earnings premium relative to high school. Altogether, the four measures of academic abilities used in the study "overall marks, performance on standardized reading tests, study habits and repeating grade" collectively account for 58.9% of the gender gap in university participation. These results suggest that understanding why girls outperform boys in the classroom may be a key to understanding the gender divide in university participation.

    Release date: 2007-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20070029989
    Description:

    Between the ages of 15 and 19, youth have three decisions to make: first, whether or not to graduate from high school; second, whether or not to go to postsecondary education; and finally, the type of institution in which to pursue that postsecondary education. Using data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), this article examines these pathways to see if there are any differences between the provinces in the choices made by boys versus girls and by youth from lower-income backgrounds versus those from higher-income backgrounds. The target population for the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), cohort A includes all 15 year-old students enrolled in an educational institution in Canada on December 31, 1999. Students were initially interviewed in April or May of 2000 and re-interviewed in February to May of 2002 and again, between February and June of 2004. Youth were questioned about their school and work activities for the two-year period directly prior to the interview date. Thus, the high school dropout and postsecondary participation rates presented here refer to the youth's schooling status as of December 2003, the last date for which data were collected. These results are representative of Canadian youth who were 15 years old as of December 1999.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060059589
    Description:

    In an increasingly knowledge-based economy, the key to equity in economic opportunity lies in equity in access to a university education. Attending university is a costly undertaking. One aspect of the costs is distance, for the many who do not live within commuting distance of a university. Using census data, a new study looks at the impact the creation of seven new universities : in British Columbia, Newfoundland and Nova Scotia : in the last 25 years has had on university attendance of local youth. The impact is positive, but not shared equally among all youth.

    Release date: 2007-02-26

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004026
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report examines factors related to entering college or university as well as to leaving postsecondary education prior to completion.

    Release date: 2004-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report looks at high school completion, postsecondary participation and labour market activities of people aged 20 to 22 years. It uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey.

    Release date: 2004-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20010046203
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines characteristics of the specialized design services industry. It also provides a 1999 snapshot of the design industry's five subindustries: landscape architecture, interior design, industrial design, graphic design and other design services.

    Release date: 2002-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2001037
    Description:

    This article examines characteristics of the specialized design services industry. While the industry is relatively small, it is strategically important as good design can make products and services more competitive. At a more detailed level, this article provides a 1998 snapshot of the design industry's five sub-industries: landscape architecture, interior design, industrial design, graphic design and "other" design services.

    The article discusses how these five sub-industries are becoming less distinct. The size of firms and how size might be related to expenses, employment patterns in the industry and characteristics of the design workforce are also studied. Also investigated is the regional distribution of design firms, the types of clients they serve and the activities they undertake. Most of the article's findings are based on results from the 1998 Survey of Specialized Design and the 1996 Census.

    Release date: 2002-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20010015781
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines characteristics of the specialized design services industry in Canada. While the industry is relatively small, it is strategically important as good design can make products and services more competitive.

    Release date: 2001-07-19
Journals and periodicals (0)

Journals and periodicals (0) (0 results)

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