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All (103) (0 to 10 of 103 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-595-M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The series includes analysis on the characteristics of those with elementary-secondary, postsecondary and apprenticeship training. It also features analysis on students’ pathways through the education system and into the labour market-- including findings for different levels of education and fields of study. This research highlights specific groups of interest such as youth, women, men, immigrants, Indigenous people (First Nations people, Métis and Inuit) and visible minorities, and how intersections between these characteristics influence people’s educational experiences. Other topics include access to education; national and international adult performance assessments; use of technology; lifelong learning; and adult education.

    Release date: 2021-11-08

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2021003
    Description:

    Canada has faced profound economic and social impacts as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. This report brings together diverse findings which illuminate changes in quality of life since March 2020, and provides value added by examining these results through a well-being lens. Specifically, the paper describes how selected aspects of well-being have been affected during the pandemic, focussing on income and wealth (financial well-being and resiliency), knowledge and skills (technology and children and youth schooling), work-life balance (child care and family bonds), health (mental health and persons with disabilities) and environmental quality (connecting with nature close to home).

    Release date: 2021-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020009
    Description:

    In a two-step immigration selection process, temporary foreign workers are first selected by employers for a temporary job, and some qualified temporary foreign workers then become economic immigrants. The details of this selection process vary among countries. For example, in the US, the temporary workers are typically sponsored by the employers in their bid to become permanent residents. In Canada, the temporary residents are selected for permanent residency by the government based on a set of largely human capital criteria, although employers may play a role in some selection pathways. Viewed in a generic manner, the two step process presents both advantages and risks. This article provides an overview of such potential advantages and risks. It is the first of five articles on the two-step selection process.

    Release date: 2020-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020010
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents the expansion of two-step immigration selection in Canada since the early 2000s. Two-step immigration selection refers to the selection of economic immigrants from among temporary foreign workers. The increased transition of a rapidly rising number of temporary foreign workers to permanent residence was made possible through the shifting composition of admission programs towards provincial programs and the Canadian Experience Class, and the growing reliance on temporary foreign workers within each admission program. This is the second of five articles on the two-step selection process.

    Release date: 2020-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020011
    Description:

    This article examines whether the increased selection of economic immigrants from among temporary foreign workers accounted for the recent improvement in immigrants’ employment rates and entry earnings. Immigrants who were former temporary foreign workers, particularly those with medium or high levels of pre-immigration Canadian earnings, had higher employment rates and earnings after immigration than other immigrants. The expansion of two step immigration selection was the driving force for the recent improvement in new immigrants’ labour market outcomes. It is the third of five articles on the two-step selection process.

    Release date: 2020-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019016
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article compares the labour force participation of temporary foreign workers with open work permits and employer-specific work permits in terms of their level of labour market engagement in Canada, their distribution by province and industry, and the duration of temporary residence status and rate of transition to permanent residency.

    Release date: 2019-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100004
    Description:

    In this study, data from the Demosim microsimulation model are used to assess the labour force participation rate of Canadians in 2036 under various scenarios of population growth and participation rate by age. In addition, the article provides an overview of the ethnocultural characteristics of persons who will be in the labour market in 2036, as well as an overview of regional differences that could exist in the labour force in 2036.

    Release date: 2019-03-20

  • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2018010
    Description:

    The data visualization tool on barriers and facilitators of labour force participation is based on data from the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS). Its purpose is to help Aboriginal organizations, government policy and program developers explore the results by Aboriginal identity, age group, sex and region. The tool will help visualize statistics on methods of looking for work, reasons for difficulty in finding work and what would help most in finding work for a specific sub-group and region. This tool is expected to enhance the uptake of information that will be published in the accompanying report: "Self-reported barriers and facilitators of labour force participation among First Nations people living off reserve, Métis, and Inuit: findings from the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey".

    Release date: 2018-11-26

  • Stats in brief: 89-28-0001201800100005
    Description:

    These tables show the projected distribution of the population aged 15 years and over by age group and labour force status as well as the projected participation rate by age group in 2017 and 2036 according to the reference scenario. The reference scenario assumes a medium growth of the population and a future evolution of participation rates which follows the trend observed from 1995 to 2017.

    Release date: 2018-09-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-503-X
    Description:

    Understanding the role of women in Canadian society and how it has changed over time is dependent on having information that can begin to shed light on the diverse circumstances and experiences of women. Women in Canada provides an unparalleled compilation of data related to women's family status, education, employment, economic well-being, unpaid work, health, and more.

    Women in Canada allows readers to better understand the experience of women compared to that of men. Recognizing that women are not a homogenous group and that experiences differ not only across gender but also within gender groups, Women in Canada includes chapters on immigrant women, women in a visible minority, Aboriginal women, senior women, and women with participation and activity limitations.

    Release date: 2018-07-30
Data (18)

Data (18) (0 to 10 of 18 results)

  • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2018010
    Description:

    The data visualization tool on barriers and facilitators of labour force participation is based on data from the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS). Its purpose is to help Aboriginal organizations, government policy and program developers explore the results by Aboriginal identity, age group, sex and region. The tool will help visualize statistics on methods of looking for work, reasons for difficulty in finding work and what would help most in finding work for a specific sub-group and region. This tool is expected to enhance the uptake of information that will be published in the accompanying report: "Self-reported barriers and facilitators of labour force participation among First Nations people living off reserve, Métis, and Inuit: findings from the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey".

    Release date: 2018-11-26

  • Table: 89-641-X
    Description:

    This report concerns French-language immigration outside Quebec and its recent evolution, focusing on its numbers, its geographic distribution and its demographic and social characteristics. This statistical portrait will mainly use the concept of first official language spoken (FOLS), which is now widely used as a criterion for a person's linguistic identity in studies on official language minorities. The Francophone immigrant population outside Quebec is comprised of two groups: those who have only French as their first official language spoken (French FOLS immigrants) and those who have both French and English (French-English FOLS immigrants).

    The Francophone immigrant population living outside Quebec is fairly small, both in absolute numbers and in relation to either the French-speaking population or the immigrant population as a whole. However, the relative weight of Francophone immigrants within the French-speaking population has increased, going from 6.2% to 10% between 1991 and 2006, while their weight within the overall immigrant population has varied more moderately, and in 2006 it was, at most, less than 2%.

    The majority of Francophone immigrants outside Quebec 70% are concentrated in Ontario. Furthermore, two-thirds of French-speaking immigrants live in three metropolitan areas: Toronto, Ottawa and Vancouver. In Canada outside Quebec, French-English FOLS immigrants, numbering 76,100 in the 2006 Census, are slightly more numerous than French FOLS immigrants, who number 60,900. In some cities, especially Toronto, Vancouver and Calgary, this characteristic is more prevalent, with French-English FOLS immigrants outnumbering their French FOLS counterparts by almost two to one. The demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of these two FOLS groups are sometimes quite different.

    International immigration to Canada has undergone a rapid transformation in recent decades. Immigrants of European origin have tended to give way to immigrants from Asia, Africa and Latin America. In this regard, French FOLS immigrants stand out from other immigrants in that a large proportion of them come from Africa. One of the consequences of this trend has been to change the composition of the French FOLS immigrant population; in 2006, Blacks made up 26% of that population, compared to 5% of the other two immigrant groups.

    Release date: 2010-04-06

  • Table: 97-559-X2006002
    Description:

    These data tables present 2006 Census highlights on various indicators. The tables present data on selected industry classifications (NAICS), age groups, employment level and sex and display rates for employment, unemployment and labour force participation.

    Available on the official day of release, they present information highlights via key indicators such as 2006 counts, percentage change and percent distribution, for various levels of geography. The tables also allow users to perform simple rank and sort functions.

    Release date: 2008-03-04

  • Table: 97-560-X2006005
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Education,' which presents data on certificates, diplomas or degrees completed. Data is also available for the major field of study of the highest certificate, diploma or degree completed and the province or country where it was completed. These data can be used to track the distribution of highest levels of educational attainment for the Canadian population in general, and for specific groups such as youth, women or immigrants. The data can also be used to measure the link between level of educational attainment, labour force participation and income.

    This table can be found in Topic Bundle: Education, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 97-560-XCB2006004.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-560-XWE2006005.

    Release date: 2008-03-04

  • Table: 97-560-X2006007
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Education,' which presents data on certificates, diplomas or degrees completed. Data is also available for the major field of study of the highest certificate, diploma or degree completed and the province or country where it was completed. These data can be used to track the distribution of highest levels of educational attainment for the Canadian population in general, and for specific groups such as youth, women or immigrants. The data can also be used to measure the link between level of educational attainment, labour force participation and income.

    This table can be found in Topic Bundle: Education, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 97-560-XCB2006004.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-560-XWE2006007.

    Release date: 2008-03-04

  • Table: 97-560-X2006008
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions and census subdivisions are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Education,' which presents data on certificates, diplomas or degrees completed. Data is also available for the major field of study of the highest certificate, diploma or degree completed and the province or country where it was completed. These data can be used to track the distribution of highest levels of educational attainment for the Canadian population in general, and for specific groups such as youth, women or immigrants. The data can also be used to measure the link between level of educational attainment, labour force participation and income.

    This table can be found in Topic Bundle: Education, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 97-560-XCB2006004.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-560-XWE2006008.

    Release date: 2008-03-04

  • Table: 97-560-X2006009
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Education,' which presents data on certificates, diplomas or degrees completed. Data is also available for the major field of study of the highest certificate, diploma or degree completed and the province or country where it was completed. These data can be used to track the distribution of highest levels of educational attainment for the Canadian population in general, and for specific groups such as youth, women or immigrants. The data can also be used to measure the link between level of educational attainment, labour force participation and income.

    This table can be found in Topic Bundle: Education, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 97-560-XCB2006004.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-560-XWE2006009.

    Release date: 2008-03-04

  • Table: 97-560-X2006010
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Education,' which presents data on certificates, diplomas or degrees completed. Data is also available for the major field of study of the highest certificate, diploma or degree completed and the province or country where it was completed. These data can be used to track the distribution of highest levels of educational attainment for the Canadian population in general, and for specific groups such as youth, women or immigrants. The data can also be used to measure the link between level of educational attainment, labour force participation and income.

    This table can be found in Topic Bundle: Education, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 97-560-XCB2006004.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-560-XWE2006010.

    Release date: 2008-03-04

  • Table: 97-560-X2006011
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Education,' which presents data on certificates, diplomas or degrees completed. Data is also available for the major field of study of the highest certificate, diploma or degree completed and the province or country where it was completed. These data can be used to track the distribution of highest levels of educational attainment for the Canadian population in general, and for specific groups such as youth, women or immigrants. The data can also be used to measure the link between level of educational attainment, labour force participation and income.

    This table can be found in Topic Bundle: Education, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 97-560-XCB2006004.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-560-XWE2006011.

    Release date: 2008-03-04

  • Table: 97-560-X2006014
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions and census subdivisions are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Education,' which presents data on certificates, diplomas or degrees completed. Data is also available for the major field of study of the highest certificate, diploma or degree completed and the province or country where it was completed. These data can be used to track the distribution of highest levels of educational attainment for the Canadian population in general, and for specific groups such as youth, women or immigrants. The data can also be used to measure the link between level of educational attainment, labour force participation and income.

    This table can be found in Topic Bundle: Education, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 97-560-XCB2006004.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-560-XWE2006014.

    Release date: 2008-03-04
Analysis (78)

Analysis (78) (0 to 10 of 78 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-595-M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The series includes analysis on the characteristics of those with elementary-secondary, postsecondary and apprenticeship training. It also features analysis on students’ pathways through the education system and into the labour market-- including findings for different levels of education and fields of study. This research highlights specific groups of interest such as youth, women, men, immigrants, Indigenous people (First Nations people, Métis and Inuit) and visible minorities, and how intersections between these characteristics influence people’s educational experiences. Other topics include access to education; national and international adult performance assessments; use of technology; lifelong learning; and adult education.

    Release date: 2021-11-08

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2021003
    Description:

    Canada has faced profound economic and social impacts as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. This report brings together diverse findings which illuminate changes in quality of life since March 2020, and provides value added by examining these results through a well-being lens. Specifically, the paper describes how selected aspects of well-being have been affected during the pandemic, focussing on income and wealth (financial well-being and resiliency), knowledge and skills (technology and children and youth schooling), work-life balance (child care and family bonds), health (mental health and persons with disabilities) and environmental quality (connecting with nature close to home).

    Release date: 2021-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020009
    Description:

    In a two-step immigration selection process, temporary foreign workers are first selected by employers for a temporary job, and some qualified temporary foreign workers then become economic immigrants. The details of this selection process vary among countries. For example, in the US, the temporary workers are typically sponsored by the employers in their bid to become permanent residents. In Canada, the temporary residents are selected for permanent residency by the government based on a set of largely human capital criteria, although employers may play a role in some selection pathways. Viewed in a generic manner, the two step process presents both advantages and risks. This article provides an overview of such potential advantages and risks. It is the first of five articles on the two-step selection process.

    Release date: 2020-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020010
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents the expansion of two-step immigration selection in Canada since the early 2000s. Two-step immigration selection refers to the selection of economic immigrants from among temporary foreign workers. The increased transition of a rapidly rising number of temporary foreign workers to permanent residence was made possible through the shifting composition of admission programs towards provincial programs and the Canadian Experience Class, and the growing reliance on temporary foreign workers within each admission program. This is the second of five articles on the two-step selection process.

    Release date: 2020-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020011
    Description:

    This article examines whether the increased selection of economic immigrants from among temporary foreign workers accounted for the recent improvement in immigrants’ employment rates and entry earnings. Immigrants who were former temporary foreign workers, particularly those with medium or high levels of pre-immigration Canadian earnings, had higher employment rates and earnings after immigration than other immigrants. The expansion of two step immigration selection was the driving force for the recent improvement in new immigrants’ labour market outcomes. It is the third of five articles on the two-step selection process.

    Release date: 2020-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019016
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article compares the labour force participation of temporary foreign workers with open work permits and employer-specific work permits in terms of their level of labour market engagement in Canada, their distribution by province and industry, and the duration of temporary residence status and rate of transition to permanent residency.

    Release date: 2019-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100004
    Description:

    In this study, data from the Demosim microsimulation model are used to assess the labour force participation rate of Canadians in 2036 under various scenarios of population growth and participation rate by age. In addition, the article provides an overview of the ethnocultural characteristics of persons who will be in the labour market in 2036, as well as an overview of regional differences that could exist in the labour force in 2036.

    Release date: 2019-03-20

  • Stats in brief: 89-28-0001201800100005
    Description:

    These tables show the projected distribution of the population aged 15 years and over by age group and labour force status as well as the projected participation rate by age group in 2017 and 2036 according to the reference scenario. The reference scenario assumes a medium growth of the population and a future evolution of participation rates which follows the trend observed from 1995 to 2017.

    Release date: 2018-09-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-503-X
    Description:

    Understanding the role of women in Canadian society and how it has changed over time is dependent on having information that can begin to shed light on the diverse circumstances and experiences of women. Women in Canada provides an unparalleled compilation of data related to women's family status, education, employment, economic well-being, unpaid work, health, and more.

    Women in Canada allows readers to better understand the experience of women compared to that of men. Recognizing that women are not a homogenous group and that experiences differ not only across gender but also within gender groups, Women in Canada includes chapters on immigrant women, women in a visible minority, Aboriginal women, senior women, and women with participation and activity limitations.

    Release date: 2018-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154976
    Description:

    Using data from the Canadian Vital Statistics Birth Database and from the Labour Force Survey (LFS), this study examines the relationship between fertility rates and labour force participation among women aged 15 to 44 in Ontario and in Quebec between 1996 and 2016, two provinces that followed different paths with respect to parental leave benefits and affordable child care over the past two decades.

    Release date: 2018-07-18
Reference (5)

Reference (5) ((5 results))

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