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  • Stats in brief: 11-629-X2020001
    Description:

    As technology continues to evolve, it is more important now than ever to promote and strengthen security for individuals, governments and businesses to mitigate and prevent complex security threats. As a result of our new digital reality, the nature of crime, and the ways in which law enforcement and emergency response agencies work, are also evolving.

    While technology has the power to enable or facilitate crime, it can also be used as an effective tool to prevent, detect and respond to crime and other emergencies, and contribute to evidence-based decision-making in public safety.

    This panel discussion addresses the changing landscape of community safety, and discuss the role data continues to play in countering cybercrime in our new digital era.

    Release date: 2020-02-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201900100004
    Description:

    This Juristat article provides an overview of the Canadian Police Performance Metrics Framework. A performance metric is a measurable value that serves as an indicator of how effectively an organization is achieving its key objectives. In policing, a broad spectrum of responsibilities exist ranging from law enforcement, emergency response and crime prevention, to providing assistance to victims and collaborating with external agencies.The information presented in this article represents the results of a review of the literature on measuring police performance, an examination of how Canadian police services are currently using data in public performance reports, and the results of a consultation of Canadian police services on data availability and information needs. The article also includes preliminary results of a pilot project of the feasibility of collecting uniform calls for service data from Canadian police services.

    Release date: 2019-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201900100006
    Description:

    This Juristat article provides new and current insights into the behaviour of Canadian businesses as they meet the cyber security challenges of a changing world. It presents information on how businesses are exposed to cyber security risks and threats, the impact cybercrime had on business operations in 2017, the reporting practices of businesses and the types of security measures businesses invest in to protect against cybercrime. Where appropriate, the article compares data from the Canadian Survey of Cyber Security and Cybercrime to the information collected through United Kingdom's Cyber Security Breaches Survey, 2018, to understand whether the experience of Canadian businesses is similar to that of UK Businesses.

    Release date: 2019-03-28

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2018026
    Description:

    This infographic presents results from the 2017 Canadian Survey of Cyber Security and Cybercrime. It illustrates the preventative measures Canadian businesses use to protect against cybercrime, their reasons for implementing these measures, and the associated costs. As well, it illustrates the impact of cybercrime on Canadian businesses, such as the types of cyber security incidents they experienced and the costs of recovering from those incidents.

    Release date: 2018-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201300111766
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Juristat article on violence against women is organized into four sections: prevalence and severity of violence against women, risk factors associated with violence against women, impact of violence against women and responses to violence against women.

    To provide a comprehensive picture of the extent and nature of violence against women, both police-reported crime data and self-reported victimization data are used. The analysis also draws on information from two administrative surveys, namely the Transition Home Survey and the Victims Services Survey.

    Release date: 2013-02-25

  • Public use microdata: 12M0023X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 23 (2009) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 23 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    The purpose of this survey is to better understand how Canadians perceive crime and the justice system and their experiences of victimization. The survey is designed to produce estimates of the extent to which persons are the victims of eight types of offences (assault, sexual assault, robbery, theft of personal property, breaking and entering, motor vehicle theft, theft of household property and vandalism); to examine the risk factors associated with victimization; to examine the rates of reporting to the police; and to evaluate the fear of crime and public perceptions of crime and the criminal justice system.

    Cycle 23 is the fifth cycle of the GSS dedicated to collecting data on victimization. Previous cycles had been conducted in 1988, 1993, 1999 and 2004. Cycle 23 includes most of the content from previous cycles as well as new content, added to reflect the society's emerging issues of crime prevention and Internet victimization.

    Release date: 2011-02-10

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000111147
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    This Juristat article provides an overview of caseload and characteristics of young persons aged 12 to 17 years admitted to and released from correctional services in 2008/2009, and includes a focused analysis of Aboriginal youth in corrections. The article uses data from the Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey and the Integrated Correctional Services Survey (ICSS) to analyze trends in admissions to and releases from sentenced custody, remand (pre-trial detention) and probation. These data are examined based on key case characteristics such as age, sex, most serious offence and length of time served. Focused analysis of Aboriginal youth includes comparisons with non-Aboriginal youth in the following areas: incarceration rates as of Census Day 2006 for jurisdictions that provided detailed data (i.e., Newfoundland and Labrador and New Brunswick combined, Ontario and Alberta); length of time spent in custody and offence types.

    Release date: 2010-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2008018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the 2006 Census of Population and self-reported data from the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization, this profile examines certain socio-demographic and economic characteristics of immigrants in Canada followed by an analysis of the rates and characteristics of violent crimes involving immigrant victims. It also provides information on immigrants perceptions of safety, of the criminal justice system and of discrimination.

    Release date: 2008-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the major trends in the series on the spatial analysis of crime conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCJS) using geographic information system technology in Canadian cities. The main purpose of this analytical series was to explore the relationships between the distribution of crime and the demographic, socio economic and functional characteristics of neighbourhoods. Questions addressed include: How are police reported criminal incidents distributed across city neighbourhoods? Is the crime rate in a neighbourhood associated with factors that are specific to that neighbourhood, such as its demographic, socio-economic, housing and land use characteristics? Is the crime rate in a neighbourhood influenced by nearby neighbourhoods? These questions were explored using data from the 2001 Census of Population, the Incident-Based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2), and land use data provided by the various cities.

    Release date: 2008-10-07

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2006012
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report, using data from the General Social Survey on victimization, examines the various crime prevention measures employed by Canadians and the factors associated with their use.

    The report finds that many Canadians employ crime prevention techniques such as locking car doors, planning their route with safety in mind and checking the back seat for intruders, on a regular basis. Furthermore, many Canadians used protective strategies such as altering their routine, avoiding certain places, installing burglar alarms and changing their locks to guard against crime, at sometime in their lives. More extreme measures, such as changing their residence or buying a gun were much less likely.

    This report also demonstrates that a number of personal, household, and perceived neighbourhood characteristics are associated with the use of crime prevention measures. Specifically, usage of crime prevention techniques was more common among women, those previously victimized, well-educated individuals and urban-dwellers. Also, those who felt crime rates in their neighbourhood had increased and were higher than rates elsewhere in Canada were most likely to employ crime prevention measures.

    Release date: 2006-11-23
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Public use microdata: 12M0023X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 23 (2009) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 23 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    The purpose of this survey is to better understand how Canadians perceive crime and the justice system and their experiences of victimization. The survey is designed to produce estimates of the extent to which persons are the victims of eight types of offences (assault, sexual assault, robbery, theft of personal property, breaking and entering, motor vehicle theft, theft of household property and vandalism); to examine the risk factors associated with victimization; to examine the rates of reporting to the police; and to evaluate the fear of crime and public perceptions of crime and the criminal justice system.

    Cycle 23 is the fifth cycle of the GSS dedicated to collecting data on victimization. Previous cycles had been conducted in 1988, 1993, 1999 and 2004. Cycle 23 includes most of the content from previous cycles as well as new content, added to reflect the society's emerging issues of crime prevention and Internet victimization.

    Release date: 2011-02-10

  • Table: 85-554-X
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This report presents a brief overview of the information collected in Cycle 13 of the General Social Survey (GSS). Cycle 13 is the third cycle (following cycles 3 and 8) that collected information in 1999 on the nature and extent of criminal victimisation in Canada. Focus content for cycle 13 addressed two areas of emerging interest: public perception toward alternatives to imprisonment; and spousal violence and senior abuse. Other subjects common to all three cycles include perceptions of crime, police and courts; crime prevention precautions; accident and crime screening sections; and accident and crime incident reports. The target population of the GSS is all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces

    Release date: 2001-08-08
Analysis (13)

Analysis (13) (0 to 10 of 13 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-629-X2020001
    Description:

    As technology continues to evolve, it is more important now than ever to promote and strengthen security for individuals, governments and businesses to mitigate and prevent complex security threats. As a result of our new digital reality, the nature of crime, and the ways in which law enforcement and emergency response agencies work, are also evolving.

    While technology has the power to enable or facilitate crime, it can also be used as an effective tool to prevent, detect and respond to crime and other emergencies, and contribute to evidence-based decision-making in public safety.

    This panel discussion addresses the changing landscape of community safety, and discuss the role data continues to play in countering cybercrime in our new digital era.

    Release date: 2020-02-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201900100004
    Description:

    This Juristat article provides an overview of the Canadian Police Performance Metrics Framework. A performance metric is a measurable value that serves as an indicator of how effectively an organization is achieving its key objectives. In policing, a broad spectrum of responsibilities exist ranging from law enforcement, emergency response and crime prevention, to providing assistance to victims and collaborating with external agencies.The information presented in this article represents the results of a review of the literature on measuring police performance, an examination of how Canadian police services are currently using data in public performance reports, and the results of a consultation of Canadian police services on data availability and information needs. The article also includes preliminary results of a pilot project of the feasibility of collecting uniform calls for service data from Canadian police services.

    Release date: 2019-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201900100006
    Description:

    This Juristat article provides new and current insights into the behaviour of Canadian businesses as they meet the cyber security challenges of a changing world. It presents information on how businesses are exposed to cyber security risks and threats, the impact cybercrime had on business operations in 2017, the reporting practices of businesses and the types of security measures businesses invest in to protect against cybercrime. Where appropriate, the article compares data from the Canadian Survey of Cyber Security and Cybercrime to the information collected through United Kingdom's Cyber Security Breaches Survey, 2018, to understand whether the experience of Canadian businesses is similar to that of UK Businesses.

    Release date: 2019-03-28

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2018026
    Description:

    This infographic presents results from the 2017 Canadian Survey of Cyber Security and Cybercrime. It illustrates the preventative measures Canadian businesses use to protect against cybercrime, their reasons for implementing these measures, and the associated costs. As well, it illustrates the impact of cybercrime on Canadian businesses, such as the types of cyber security incidents they experienced and the costs of recovering from those incidents.

    Release date: 2018-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201300111766
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Juristat article on violence against women is organized into four sections: prevalence and severity of violence against women, risk factors associated with violence against women, impact of violence against women and responses to violence against women.

    To provide a comprehensive picture of the extent and nature of violence against women, both police-reported crime data and self-reported victimization data are used. The analysis also draws on information from two administrative surveys, namely the Transition Home Survey and the Victims Services Survey.

    Release date: 2013-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000111147
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    This Juristat article provides an overview of caseload and characteristics of young persons aged 12 to 17 years admitted to and released from correctional services in 2008/2009, and includes a focused analysis of Aboriginal youth in corrections. The article uses data from the Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey and the Integrated Correctional Services Survey (ICSS) to analyze trends in admissions to and releases from sentenced custody, remand (pre-trial detention) and probation. These data are examined based on key case characteristics such as age, sex, most serious offence and length of time served. Focused analysis of Aboriginal youth includes comparisons with non-Aboriginal youth in the following areas: incarceration rates as of Census Day 2006 for jurisdictions that provided detailed data (i.e., Newfoundland and Labrador and New Brunswick combined, Ontario and Alberta); length of time spent in custody and offence types.

    Release date: 2010-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2008018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the 2006 Census of Population and self-reported data from the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization, this profile examines certain socio-demographic and economic characteristics of immigrants in Canada followed by an analysis of the rates and characteristics of violent crimes involving immigrant victims. It also provides information on immigrants perceptions of safety, of the criminal justice system and of discrimination.

    Release date: 2008-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the major trends in the series on the spatial analysis of crime conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCJS) using geographic information system technology in Canadian cities. The main purpose of this analytical series was to explore the relationships between the distribution of crime and the demographic, socio economic and functional characteristics of neighbourhoods. Questions addressed include: How are police reported criminal incidents distributed across city neighbourhoods? Is the crime rate in a neighbourhood associated with factors that are specific to that neighbourhood, such as its demographic, socio-economic, housing and land use characteristics? Is the crime rate in a neighbourhood influenced by nearby neighbourhoods? These questions were explored using data from the 2001 Census of Population, the Incident-Based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2), and land use data provided by the various cities.

    Release date: 2008-10-07

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2006012
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report, using data from the General Social Survey on victimization, examines the various crime prevention measures employed by Canadians and the factors associated with their use.

    The report finds that many Canadians employ crime prevention techniques such as locking car doors, planning their route with safety in mind and checking the back seat for intruders, on a regular basis. Furthermore, many Canadians used protective strategies such as altering their routine, avoiding certain places, installing burglar alarms and changing their locks to guard against crime, at sometime in their lives. More extreme measures, such as changing their residence or buying a gun were much less likely.

    This report also demonstrates that a number of personal, household, and perceived neighbourhood characteristics are associated with the use of crime prevention measures. Specifically, usage of crime prevention techniques was more common among women, those previously victimized, well-educated individuals and urban-dwellers. Also, those who felt crime rates in their neighbourhood had increased and were higher than rates elsewhere in Canada were most likely to employ crime prevention measures.

    Release date: 2006-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20030018412
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This edition of Juristat provides a profile of motor vehicle theft in Canada. It examines the international trends, methods and prevalence of organized crime in Canadian auto theft, as well as recent auto-theft prevention programs and strategies.

    Release date: 2003-01-08
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