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All (11) (0 to 10 of 11 results)

  • Public use microdata: 12M0023X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 23 (2009) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 23 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    The purpose of this survey is to better understand how Canadians perceive crime and the justice system and their experiences of victimization. The survey is designed to produce estimates of the extent to which persons are the victims of eight types of offences (assault, sexual assault, robbery, theft of personal property, breaking and entering, motor vehicle theft, theft of household property and vandalism); to examine the risk factors associated with victimization; to examine the rates of reporting to the police; and to evaluate the fear of crime and public perceptions of crime and the criminal justice system.

    Cycle 23 is the fifth cycle of the GSS dedicated to collecting data on victimization. Previous cycles had been conducted in 1988, 1993, 1999 and 2004. Cycle 23 includes most of the content from previous cycles as well as new content, added to reflect the society's emerging issues of crime prevention and Internet victimization.

    Release date: 2011-02-10

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2008018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the 2006 Census of Population and self-reported data from the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization, this profile examines certain socio-demographic and economic characteristics of immigrants in Canada followed by an analysis of the rates and characteristics of violent crimes involving immigrant victims. It also provides information on immigrants perceptions of safety, of the criminal justice system and of discrimination.

    Release date: 2008-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020048414
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2000 International Crime Victimization Survey (ICVS) provides comparable international information on the nature and extent of crime. Respondents supply detailed information on 11 types of crime, including when, where and how often offences occurred over the previous five years; whether offences were reported to the police; and whether victimization experiences were considered serious. Participants give their opinions on public safety, policing and sentencing.

    This Juristat presents an overview of the findings of the 2000 ICVS and makes comparisons with previous survey cycles from 1989, 1992 and 1996. The majority of the analysis focuses on data from the following 13 of 17 participants: Canada, Australia, Belgium, England and Wales, Finland, France, Japan, the Netherlands, Northern Ireland, Poland, Scotland, Sweden and the United States. Canada was one of the 17 industrialized countries that participated in 2000 and is one of five industrialized countries to have participated in all four cycles of the survey.

    Release date: 2002-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015809
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The primary purpose of this chapter is to examine the factors associated with the risk of household victimization. First though, trends in household crime as well as the impact of household crime will be discussed.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015811
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using the results of the 1999 GSS on Victimization, this chapter will look at the issue of reporting to police in more detail.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-553-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report provides an in-depth analysis of the findings of the 1999 General Social Survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. The chapters examine the risks of violent and household victimization; urban and rural victimization; victims' use of services; and perceptions and fear of crime.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Journals and periodicals: 85F0035X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A comparison of crime rates between Canada and the United States is often sought by the media, researchers, and policy makers. Recognizing this demand, along with the methodological complexities, the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics has undertaken the task of assessing the feasibility of comparing police reported statistics between these two countries. This report compares and contrasts the specific offence definitions, classification, and scoring rules of the Canadian and American Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) surveys. Offences are organized according to the type of survey (aggregate versus incident based) and level of analysis (incident level and accused level). Where applicable, the discussion notes modifications that could allow for reliable cross-national comparisons. The report also briefly discusses the potential of comparing detailed offence characteristics.

    Release date: 2001-07-03

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-551-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report describes some pertinent issues of hate crime: previous findings, international comparisons, recent initiatives, current data sources, and a description of police resources. It also includes findings from the 1999 General Social Survey, which measured self-reported hate crime victimization incidents at the national level.

    Release date: 2001-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000128385
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    In 1999, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. It was the third time that the General Social Survey (GSS) had examined victimization - previous surveys were conducted in 1993 and 1988.

    For the 1999 survey, interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 26,000 people, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked for their opinions concerning the level of crime in their neighbourhood, their fear of crime and their views concerning the performance of the justice system. They were also asked about their attitudes toward sentencing adult and young offenders. Respondents were randomly presented with one of four hypothetical situations for which they were asked to choose "prison" or "non-prison". Respondents who selected prison sentences were given a follow-up question that asked them whether a sentence of one year of probation and 200 hours of community work was an acceptable alternative to the prison sentence.

    This Juristat examines public attitudes toward sentencing adult and young offenders. It also analyzes public attitudes toward four sectors of the justice system including, the police, the criminal courts, the prison and parole systems.

    Release date: 2000-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000108383
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    In 1999, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. It was the third time that the General Social Survey (GSS) had examined victimization - previous surveys were conducted in 1993 and 1988.

    For the 1999 survey, interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 26,000 people, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked for their opinions concerning the level of crime in their neighbourhood, their fear of crime and their views concerning the performance of the justice system. They were also asked about their experiences with criminal victimization. Those respondents who had been victims of a crime in the previous 12 months were asked for detailed information on each incident, including when and where it occurred; whether the incident was reported to the police; and how they were affected by the experience.

    This Juristat presents an overview of the findings of the 1999 General Social Survey and makes comparisons to results from 1993 and 1988.

    Release date: 2000-11-02
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Public use microdata: 12M0023X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 23 (2009) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 23 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    The purpose of this survey is to better understand how Canadians perceive crime and the justice system and their experiences of victimization. The survey is designed to produce estimates of the extent to which persons are the victims of eight types of offences (assault, sexual assault, robbery, theft of personal property, breaking and entering, motor vehicle theft, theft of household property and vandalism); to examine the risk factors associated with victimization; to examine the rates of reporting to the police; and to evaluate the fear of crime and public perceptions of crime and the criminal justice system.

    Cycle 23 is the fifth cycle of the GSS dedicated to collecting data on victimization. Previous cycles had been conducted in 1988, 1993, 1999 and 2004. Cycle 23 includes most of the content from previous cycles as well as new content, added to reflect the society's emerging issues of crime prevention and Internet victimization.

    Release date: 2011-02-10
Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) ((10 results))

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2008018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the 2006 Census of Population and self-reported data from the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization, this profile examines certain socio-demographic and economic characteristics of immigrants in Canada followed by an analysis of the rates and characteristics of violent crimes involving immigrant victims. It also provides information on immigrants perceptions of safety, of the criminal justice system and of discrimination.

    Release date: 2008-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020048414
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2000 International Crime Victimization Survey (ICVS) provides comparable international information on the nature and extent of crime. Respondents supply detailed information on 11 types of crime, including when, where and how often offences occurred over the previous five years; whether offences were reported to the police; and whether victimization experiences were considered serious. Participants give their opinions on public safety, policing and sentencing.

    This Juristat presents an overview of the findings of the 2000 ICVS and makes comparisons with previous survey cycles from 1989, 1992 and 1996. The majority of the analysis focuses on data from the following 13 of 17 participants: Canada, Australia, Belgium, England and Wales, Finland, France, Japan, the Netherlands, Northern Ireland, Poland, Scotland, Sweden and the United States. Canada was one of the 17 industrialized countries that participated in 2000 and is one of five industrialized countries to have participated in all four cycles of the survey.

    Release date: 2002-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015809
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The primary purpose of this chapter is to examine the factors associated with the risk of household victimization. First though, trends in household crime as well as the impact of household crime will be discussed.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015811
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using the results of the 1999 GSS on Victimization, this chapter will look at the issue of reporting to police in more detail.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-553-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report provides an in-depth analysis of the findings of the 1999 General Social Survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. The chapters examine the risks of violent and household victimization; urban and rural victimization; victims' use of services; and perceptions and fear of crime.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Journals and periodicals: 85F0035X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A comparison of crime rates between Canada and the United States is often sought by the media, researchers, and policy makers. Recognizing this demand, along with the methodological complexities, the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics has undertaken the task of assessing the feasibility of comparing police reported statistics between these two countries. This report compares and contrasts the specific offence definitions, classification, and scoring rules of the Canadian and American Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) surveys. Offences are organized according to the type of survey (aggregate versus incident based) and level of analysis (incident level and accused level). Where applicable, the discussion notes modifications that could allow for reliable cross-national comparisons. The report also briefly discusses the potential of comparing detailed offence characteristics.

    Release date: 2001-07-03

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-551-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report describes some pertinent issues of hate crime: previous findings, international comparisons, recent initiatives, current data sources, and a description of police resources. It also includes findings from the 1999 General Social Survey, which measured self-reported hate crime victimization incidents at the national level.

    Release date: 2001-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000128385
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    In 1999, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. It was the third time that the General Social Survey (GSS) had examined victimization - previous surveys were conducted in 1993 and 1988.

    For the 1999 survey, interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 26,000 people, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked for their opinions concerning the level of crime in their neighbourhood, their fear of crime and their views concerning the performance of the justice system. They were also asked about their attitudes toward sentencing adult and young offenders. Respondents were randomly presented with one of four hypothetical situations for which they were asked to choose "prison" or "non-prison". Respondents who selected prison sentences were given a follow-up question that asked them whether a sentence of one year of probation and 200 hours of community work was an acceptable alternative to the prison sentence.

    This Juristat examines public attitudes toward sentencing adult and young offenders. It also analyzes public attitudes toward four sectors of the justice system including, the police, the criminal courts, the prison and parole systems.

    Release date: 2000-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000108383
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    In 1999, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. It was the third time that the General Social Survey (GSS) had examined victimization - previous surveys were conducted in 1993 and 1988.

    For the 1999 survey, interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 26,000 people, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked for their opinions concerning the level of crime in their neighbourhood, their fear of crime and their views concerning the performance of the justice system. They were also asked about their experiences with criminal victimization. Those respondents who had been victims of a crime in the previous 12 months were asked for detailed information on each incident, including when and where it occurred; whether the incident was reported to the police; and how they were affected by the experience.

    This Juristat presents an overview of the findings of the 1999 General Social Survey and makes comparisons to results from 1993 and 1988.

    Release date: 2000-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19980044654
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The analysis of NLSCY school data presented in this article begins by exploring principals' evaluations of the adequacy of their schools' resources. Next, the presence, activity and influence of school advisory committees are examined. Following this, the article looks at the levels of regular staff and special resource staff are considered. The paper ends by describing a few features associated with students attending NLSCY schools.

    Release date: 1999-07-30
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