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All (38) (0 to 10 of 38 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114464
    Description:

    Using data from the 2014 Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS), this study examines the gap in the financial knowledge of men and women and how the difference varies across socioeconomic characteristics such as age and education. It also provides additional insight into the financial knowledge of Canadian men and women who are married or in a common-law union.

    Release date: 2016-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2009024
    Description:

    This paper uses plant-level data on productivity growth and changes in market share over different periods during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s to investigate whether plants with declining market shares obtain productivity spillovers from more successful producers and whether the impact of spillovers is affected by the distance between plants. We are primarily interested in the extent to which productivity externalities moderate the centrifugal forces that separate growing plants from declining rivals because of the productivity advantages enjoyed by the former.

    The paper focuses on the productivity performance of plants with declining market shares as potential receivers of productivity spillovers. Two possible sources for these spillovers are examined rival plants operating at the technological frontier and rivals that are actively gaining market share. The analysis advances a model of the externality process in which the productivity of declining plants is influenced by (1) the economic distance of the declining plant from its technological frontier at the beginning of any period, (2) contemporaneous productivity gains in rival plants that are actively wresting market share away from decliners, and (3) the distance between rival plants.

    We evaluate the existence and magnitude of these sources of spillovers frontier plants and market-share gainers because of what they reveal about the types of productive information that struggling plants may be able to assimilate from rivals. Spillovers from the plants at the existing frontier are likely to reflect the established best practices of industry leaders; spillovers coming from market-share gainers involve new sources of productive knowledge that emerge as the frontier is actively being re-established. Our model also incorporates geographic information on the proximity of declining plants to both frontier plants and market-share gainers to test whether productivity spillovers are spatially circumscribed. The results provide evidence that productivity improvements in more successful plants benefit their struggling rivals and that these benefits are inversely related to distance; however, the magnitude of spillovers from growing plants to decliners is relatively small. Spillovers do not offer much of a safety net for producers that are losing the productivity race. The paper also shows that declining plants that start out behind the technological frontier are likely to fall further behind, after the impact of mean reversion is taken into account.

    Release date: 2009-05-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008065
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report presents findings from the 2004/2005 Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). The survey was administered to all students graduating from a doctoral program at a Canadian University. The 2004/2005 SED is the second edition of the annual survey.

    In the 2004/2005 academic year there were approximately 4,000 new doctoral graduates, adding to the stock of highly specialized human capital in Canada. Over three quarters of Canada's PhD graduates are completing their studies in a science or engineering field, with the most popular field of study being biological sciences. Although PhD graduates accounted for roughly 0.4% of the population, Canada lags behind many other OECD countries in this regard.

    Most graduates were finding success upon completion of their degrees as a large majority of graduates (73%) had firm plans to be working or continuing their studies by the time of graduation. The proportion of students who graduated without any graduate student debt decreased from the year before to reach 59%. Over three quarters of the graduates plan to stay in Canada to either work or continue their education.

    Release date: 2008-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008064
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study analyzes the extent to which culture workers were employed outside of culture industries during the 1990s.

    Release date: 2008-04-10

  • Articles and reports: 81-590-X2007001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) is a collaborative effort among member countries of the OECD, designed to assess, on a regular basis, the achievement of 15-year-olds in reading, mathematical and scientific literacy through a common international test. This report provides results from the PISA 2006 assessment of student performance in science, reading and mathematics at the provincial level, and compares the achievement of Canadian students to that of students internationally. PISA 2006 has a special focus on science. Over fifty countries participated in PISA 2006, including all 30 OECD countries. About 22,000 15-year-olds from more than 1,000 schools took part in Canada.

    Release date: 2008-03-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the presence of knowledge spillovers that affect the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It examines whether plants that adopt advanced technologies are more likely to do so when there are other nearby plants that do so within a model of technology adoption.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2007004
    Description:

    For the past several years, Statistics Canada has been collecting information through surveys on innovation, research and development and more generally on science and technology. This study focuses more on the organizational aspects, and it seeks to provide information for answering the following question: once a company or organization has developed knowledge and a product or process, how does it go about generating benefits in terms of income, cost savings and strategic positioning?

    Release date: 2007-07-16

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019619
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2005 Survey of Innovation asked innovative manufacturing establishments questions related to how they acquired knowledge and technology for innovation and from whom. This article analyzes the two thirds of manufacturing establishments that were innovative that is they introduced a new or significantly improved product or process during the three reference years, 2002 to 2004 and sheds light on their purchase of knowledge and technology, the importance of information sources, and their collaborative partners.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006003
    Description:

    The objective of this study was to continue the investigation into growth factors initiated by the previous project: The characteristics of firms that grow from small to medium size in collaboration with the National Research Council Industrial Research Assistance Program (NRC-IRAP). Twenty five interviews augmented the original 25 with a more heterogeneous mix of Canadian technology-based firms led to the development of a framework for assessing the technology phase of small companies (or business lines in larger companies).

    Release date: 2006-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006010
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data on manufacturing plants operating in Canada for the period 1981 to 1997, we estimate the effect of changes in the level of foreign control upon labour productivity in domestically-controlled plants. We distinguish between foreign control in own industry of domestically-controlled plants and foreign control in industries linked by their supply or use of intermediate inputs. We find that foreign control increases productivity growth in domestically-controlled plants in a way that is consistent with the transfer of technology from foreign suppliers to domestically-controlled plants. The positive productivity effects of foreign control are more pronounced for those plants that outsource more intermediates, and who purchase science-based intermediate inputs (i.e., electronics, machinery and equipment, and chemicals).

    Release date: 2006-04-13
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Analysis (38)

Analysis (38) (0 to 10 of 38 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114464
    Description:

    Using data from the 2014 Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS), this study examines the gap in the financial knowledge of men and women and how the difference varies across socioeconomic characteristics such as age and education. It also provides additional insight into the financial knowledge of Canadian men and women who are married or in a common-law union.

    Release date: 2016-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2009024
    Description:

    This paper uses plant-level data on productivity growth and changes in market share over different periods during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s to investigate whether plants with declining market shares obtain productivity spillovers from more successful producers and whether the impact of spillovers is affected by the distance between plants. We are primarily interested in the extent to which productivity externalities moderate the centrifugal forces that separate growing plants from declining rivals because of the productivity advantages enjoyed by the former.

    The paper focuses on the productivity performance of plants with declining market shares as potential receivers of productivity spillovers. Two possible sources for these spillovers are examined rival plants operating at the technological frontier and rivals that are actively gaining market share. The analysis advances a model of the externality process in which the productivity of declining plants is influenced by (1) the economic distance of the declining plant from its technological frontier at the beginning of any period, (2) contemporaneous productivity gains in rival plants that are actively wresting market share away from decliners, and (3) the distance between rival plants.

    We evaluate the existence and magnitude of these sources of spillovers frontier plants and market-share gainers because of what they reveal about the types of productive information that struggling plants may be able to assimilate from rivals. Spillovers from the plants at the existing frontier are likely to reflect the established best practices of industry leaders; spillovers coming from market-share gainers involve new sources of productive knowledge that emerge as the frontier is actively being re-established. Our model also incorporates geographic information on the proximity of declining plants to both frontier plants and market-share gainers to test whether productivity spillovers are spatially circumscribed. The results provide evidence that productivity improvements in more successful plants benefit their struggling rivals and that these benefits are inversely related to distance; however, the magnitude of spillovers from growing plants to decliners is relatively small. Spillovers do not offer much of a safety net for producers that are losing the productivity race. The paper also shows that declining plants that start out behind the technological frontier are likely to fall further behind, after the impact of mean reversion is taken into account.

    Release date: 2009-05-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008065
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report presents findings from the 2004/2005 Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). The survey was administered to all students graduating from a doctoral program at a Canadian University. The 2004/2005 SED is the second edition of the annual survey.

    In the 2004/2005 academic year there were approximately 4,000 new doctoral graduates, adding to the stock of highly specialized human capital in Canada. Over three quarters of Canada's PhD graduates are completing their studies in a science or engineering field, with the most popular field of study being biological sciences. Although PhD graduates accounted for roughly 0.4% of the population, Canada lags behind many other OECD countries in this regard.

    Most graduates were finding success upon completion of their degrees as a large majority of graduates (73%) had firm plans to be working or continuing their studies by the time of graduation. The proportion of students who graduated without any graduate student debt decreased from the year before to reach 59%. Over three quarters of the graduates plan to stay in Canada to either work or continue their education.

    Release date: 2008-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008064
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study analyzes the extent to which culture workers were employed outside of culture industries during the 1990s.

    Release date: 2008-04-10

  • Articles and reports: 81-590-X2007001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) is a collaborative effort among member countries of the OECD, designed to assess, on a regular basis, the achievement of 15-year-olds in reading, mathematical and scientific literacy through a common international test. This report provides results from the PISA 2006 assessment of student performance in science, reading and mathematics at the provincial level, and compares the achievement of Canadian students to that of students internationally. PISA 2006 has a special focus on science. Over fifty countries participated in PISA 2006, including all 30 OECD countries. About 22,000 15-year-olds from more than 1,000 schools took part in Canada.

    Release date: 2008-03-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the presence of knowledge spillovers that affect the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It examines whether plants that adopt advanced technologies are more likely to do so when there are other nearby plants that do so within a model of technology adoption.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2007004
    Description:

    For the past several years, Statistics Canada has been collecting information through surveys on innovation, research and development and more generally on science and technology. This study focuses more on the organizational aspects, and it seeks to provide information for answering the following question: once a company or organization has developed knowledge and a product or process, how does it go about generating benefits in terms of income, cost savings and strategic positioning?

    Release date: 2007-07-16

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019619
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2005 Survey of Innovation asked innovative manufacturing establishments questions related to how they acquired knowledge and technology for innovation and from whom. This article analyzes the two thirds of manufacturing establishments that were innovative that is they introduced a new or significantly improved product or process during the three reference years, 2002 to 2004 and sheds light on their purchase of knowledge and technology, the importance of information sources, and their collaborative partners.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006003
    Description:

    The objective of this study was to continue the investigation into growth factors initiated by the previous project: The characteristics of firms that grow from small to medium size in collaboration with the National Research Council Industrial Research Assistance Program (NRC-IRAP). Twenty five interviews augmented the original 25 with a more heterogeneous mix of Canadian technology-based firms led to the development of a framework for assessing the technology phase of small companies (or business lines in larger companies).

    Release date: 2006-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006010
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data on manufacturing plants operating in Canada for the period 1981 to 1997, we estimate the effect of changes in the level of foreign control upon labour productivity in domestically-controlled plants. We distinguish between foreign control in own industry of domestically-controlled plants and foreign control in industries linked by their supply or use of intermediate inputs. We find that foreign control increases productivity growth in domestically-controlled plants in a way that is consistent with the transfer of technology from foreign suppliers to domestically-controlled plants. The positive productivity effects of foreign control are more pronounced for those plants that outsource more intermediates, and who purchase science-based intermediate inputs (i.e., electronics, machinery and equipment, and chemicals).

    Release date: 2006-04-13
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