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All (14) (0 to 10 of 14 results)

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2016009
    Description:

    This article in the Census in Brief series shows the recent evolution of the bilingualism rate in Canada, the provinces and the territories. It also illustrates the changes in the bilingual population within different regions and mother tongue groups between 2011 and 2016. It focuses on the bilingualism rate of school-age Canadians whose mother tongue is English and who live outside of Quebec.

    Release date: 2017-08-02

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2017003
    Description:

    The infographic presents the main findings of the microsimulation language projections (with DEMOSIM) of the evolution of the population by mother tongue, first official language spoken, bilingualism, and knowledge of French in Canada, Quebec and in the rest of Canada from 2011 to 2036, based on various projection scenarios.

    Release date: 2017-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-657-X2017001
    Description:

    Projection of four language variables with Demosim microsimulation model for Canada, provinces and territories, and language contact regions from 2011 to 2036.

    Release date: 2017-01-25

  • Stats in brief: 11-630-X2016001
    Description:

    This edition of Canadian Megatrends explores the evolution of English-French bilingualism in Canada from 1901 to 2011.

    Release date: 2016-01-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-003-X
    Description:

    Canadian Demographics at a glance is designed to gather a maximum of demographic information in a single document, giving users an easily and quickly accessible up-to-date picture of the Canadian population. It presents data on demographic growth, fertility, mortality, migratory movements, aging and ethno-cultural diversity of the population in the form of tables and graphs accompanied by a brief analytical commentary.

    Release date: 2014-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111795
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In Canada, one significant event that eventually led to the development of a policy of bilingualism was the beginning of the Royal Commission on bilingualism and biculturalism, 50 years ago. This article examines historical trends in bilingualism in Canada, and factors that might explain these trends.

    Release date: 2013-05-28

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800410767
    Description:

    This article uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) to link the self-rated ability of youth to converse in both English and French at age 21 to the type of language schooling they had received in elementary and high school. YITS collected information on mother tongue, language of school system (at age 15) as well as information (from parents) on whether and when students had been enrolled in some form of immersion, extended or intensive language program. Information was also collected on self-rated ability to converse in French and English. It is therefore possible to look at rates of bilingualism for youth with varying amounts of second-language schooling.

    Release date: 2008-12-16

  • Table: 97-555-X2006001
    Description:

    This theme deals with Canadians' mother tongue and language spoken at home, as well as with their knowledge of English and French. Data from the 2006 Census show, despite an increasingly multilingual Canadian society, that linguistic duality persists. In addition, the theme covers the evolution of English-French bilingualism in the country.

    Release date: 2007-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005270
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper adopts the decomposition technique of DiNardo, Fortin and Lemieux (DFL, 1996) to decompose provincial differences in the distribution of Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) test scores and assesses the relative contribution of provincial differences in the distribution of "class size" and time-in-term, other school factors and student background factors. Class size and time-in-term are both important school choice variables and we examine how provincial achievement differences would change if the Alberta distribution of class size and time-in-term prevailed in the other provinces. Results differ by province, and for provinces where mean achievement gaps would be lower, not all students would benefit.

    Release date: 2005-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20040026923
    Description:

    French immersion programs were introduced into Canadian schools in the 1970s to encourage bilingualism across the country. Thirty years later, immersion programs are offered in every province. French-immersion students score significantly higher in reading achievement than non-immersion students. What accounts for this difference?

    Release date: 2004-06-23
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Table: 97-555-X2006001
    Description:

    This theme deals with Canadians' mother tongue and language spoken at home, as well as with their knowledge of English and French. Data from the 2006 Census show, despite an increasingly multilingual Canadian society, that linguistic duality persists. In addition, the theme covers the evolution of English-French bilingualism in the country.

    Release date: 2007-12-04

  • Table: 75-001-X19890022277
    Description:

    This study compares the earnings of bilingual and unilingual workers in three urban centres: Montreal, Toronto and Ottawa-Hull. Differences in the earnings of bilingual and unilingual workers are considered in the light of several demographic and job-related traits.

    Release date: 1989-06-30
Analysis (12)

Analysis (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2016009
    Description:

    This article in the Census in Brief series shows the recent evolution of the bilingualism rate in Canada, the provinces and the territories. It also illustrates the changes in the bilingual population within different regions and mother tongue groups between 2011 and 2016. It focuses on the bilingualism rate of school-age Canadians whose mother tongue is English and who live outside of Quebec.

    Release date: 2017-08-02

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2017003
    Description:

    The infographic presents the main findings of the microsimulation language projections (with DEMOSIM) of the evolution of the population by mother tongue, first official language spoken, bilingualism, and knowledge of French in Canada, Quebec and in the rest of Canada from 2011 to 2036, based on various projection scenarios.

    Release date: 2017-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-657-X2017001
    Description:

    Projection of four language variables with Demosim microsimulation model for Canada, provinces and territories, and language contact regions from 2011 to 2036.

    Release date: 2017-01-25

  • Stats in brief: 11-630-X2016001
    Description:

    This edition of Canadian Megatrends explores the evolution of English-French bilingualism in Canada from 1901 to 2011.

    Release date: 2016-01-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-003-X
    Description:

    Canadian Demographics at a glance is designed to gather a maximum of demographic information in a single document, giving users an easily and quickly accessible up-to-date picture of the Canadian population. It presents data on demographic growth, fertility, mortality, migratory movements, aging and ethno-cultural diversity of the population in the form of tables and graphs accompanied by a brief analytical commentary.

    Release date: 2014-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111795
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In Canada, one significant event that eventually led to the development of a policy of bilingualism was the beginning of the Royal Commission on bilingualism and biculturalism, 50 years ago. This article examines historical trends in bilingualism in Canada, and factors that might explain these trends.

    Release date: 2013-05-28

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800410767
    Description:

    This article uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) to link the self-rated ability of youth to converse in both English and French at age 21 to the type of language schooling they had received in elementary and high school. YITS collected information on mother tongue, language of school system (at age 15) as well as information (from parents) on whether and when students had been enrolled in some form of immersion, extended or intensive language program. Information was also collected on self-rated ability to converse in French and English. It is therefore possible to look at rates of bilingualism for youth with varying amounts of second-language schooling.

    Release date: 2008-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005270
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper adopts the decomposition technique of DiNardo, Fortin and Lemieux (DFL, 1996) to decompose provincial differences in the distribution of Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) test scores and assesses the relative contribution of provincial differences in the distribution of "class size" and time-in-term, other school factors and student background factors. Class size and time-in-term are both important school choice variables and we examine how provincial achievement differences would change if the Alberta distribution of class size and time-in-term prevailed in the other provinces. Results differ by province, and for provinces where mean achievement gaps would be lower, not all students would benefit.

    Release date: 2005-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20040026923
    Description:

    French immersion programs were introduced into Canadian schools in the 1970s to encourage bilingualism across the country. Thirty years later, immersion programs are offered in every province. French-immersion students score significantly higher in reading achievement than non-immersion students. What accounts for this difference?

    Release date: 2004-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 96F0030X2001005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This theme deals with Canadians'mother tongue and language spoken at home, as well as with their knowledge of English and French. Data from the 2001 Census show, despite an increasingly multilingual Canadian society, that linguistic duality persists. In addition, the theme covers the evolution of English-French bilingualism in the country, and does this for each of the groups that have either English, French or some language other than English or French, as their mother tongue. All of the analyses are done at the province' territory level; some of them are also done at the level of the census metropolitan area.

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Dailyin the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2002-12-10
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