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All (6)

All (6) ((6 results))

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200200005
    Description:

    Using 2016 Census and administrative data, this study estimates the differences in weekly earnings received by workers in designated visible minority and White categories, as defined by the Employment Equity Act, employed in four broad sectors of the Canadian workforce. Of central interest is whether differences in weekly earnings between these categories were larger in small and medium-size commercial enterprises than they were in large commercial enterprises and in organizations and enterprises in the non-commercial sector.

    Release date: 2022-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200100004
    Description:

    Using data from the 2016 Census, this study compares the weekly earnings of individuals in designated visible minority and White categories, as defined in the Employment Equity Act. This paper addresses three sets of research questions. First, in 2015, were there significant differences in the estimated weekly earnings of individuals in designated visible minority categories relative to White people? Among which designated visible minority categories were differences in weekly earnings largest? Were these differences similar among women and men? Second, to what extent did sociodemographic and employment characteristics account for differences in average weekly earnings across designated visible minority and White categories? And third, were differences in average weekly earnings narrower, wider or about the same in 2015 as in 2005?

    Release date: 2022-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014361
    Description:

    In Canada, the selection of economic immigrants throughout the 1990s and 2000s was based largely on the human capital model of immigration. This model posits that selecting immigrants with high levels of human capital is particularly advantageous in the long run. It is argued that higher educational levels allow immigrants to both bring the skills needed in a "knowledge-based economy" and, perhaps more importantly, better adjust to both cyclical and structural changes in the labour market than immigrants with lower educational levels.

    This paper examines the trends in the earnings advantage that more highly educated immigrants hold over less educated immigrants by immigration class. The focus is on three questions. First, did the well-documented decline in entry earnings observed over the last quarter-century vary by immigrant educational level and by admission class? Second, have there been significant shifts across recent cohorts in the economic advantage that more highly educated immigrants hold over their less educated counterparts, both at entry and in the longer run? Third, and most importantly, does the relative earnings advantage of more highly educated immigrants change with time spent in Canada, that is, in the longer run?

    Release date: 2014-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013348
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study documents how hiring rates, separation rates, and worker reallocation rates evolved from the late 1970s to the late 2000s. It also examines how the pace of labour reallocation varied across industries, firm sizes, provinces, age groups, and education levels during the 2000s.

    Release date: 2013-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011339
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines how the risk of job loss and the short-term earnings losses of laid-off workers evolved between the late 1970s and the mid-2000s.

    Release date: 2011-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2009072
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This report provides new and unique empirical evidence on postsecondary education pathways in Atlantic Canada based on the data from the Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS). This study covers postsecondary students in public institutions at all levels of study - college, bachelor's, master's, Ph.D. and first professional degrees - with the emphasis on college and bachelor's students. The focus is on students who start new programs over the period of study, years 2001 through to 2004, and then observing who, in each year of their studies, graduates, continues in the same program, switches programs or leaves postsecondary education without graduating. The number of students who leave and then return to postsecondary studies and the number of students who graduate from a program and then continue in their studies are also identified. Students in this study can be tracked longitudinally as they move both within and across all institutions in the Atlantic.

    The research file used for this study was created by Statistics Canada using PSIS data from the Atlantic region. One of the key objectives of the PSIS is to provide information that will enable researchers to perform studies of student mobility, pathways and their relationship to education and labour market outcomes. PSIS is designed to hold a complete inventory of all Canadian postsecondary institutions and the programs and courses they offer, as well as demographic, program and course information for each student registered at these institutions. Atlantic Canada has participated in PSIS since the inception of PSIS and therefore was well positioned to take advantage of a longitudinal study using PSIS.

    The research file includes one longitudinal record for each postsecondary student who studied in Atlantic Canada at some point during the years 2001 through to 2004. The term "longitudinal" means that, as the student progresses through the postsecondary system, the PSIS record will provide a cumulative history of their postsecondary activity. It is the longitudinal nature of the database that allows for statistical studies of student mobility, pathways and their relationship to education and labour market outcomes. The research file contains 337,000 student records.

    Release date: 2009-02-12
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Articles and reports (6)

Articles and reports (6) ((6 results))

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200200005
    Description:

    Using 2016 Census and administrative data, this study estimates the differences in weekly earnings received by workers in designated visible minority and White categories, as defined by the Employment Equity Act, employed in four broad sectors of the Canadian workforce. Of central interest is whether differences in weekly earnings between these categories were larger in small and medium-size commercial enterprises than they were in large commercial enterprises and in organizations and enterprises in the non-commercial sector.

    Release date: 2022-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200100004
    Description:

    Using data from the 2016 Census, this study compares the weekly earnings of individuals in designated visible minority and White categories, as defined in the Employment Equity Act. This paper addresses three sets of research questions. First, in 2015, were there significant differences in the estimated weekly earnings of individuals in designated visible minority categories relative to White people? Among which designated visible minority categories were differences in weekly earnings largest? Were these differences similar among women and men? Second, to what extent did sociodemographic and employment characteristics account for differences in average weekly earnings across designated visible minority and White categories? And third, were differences in average weekly earnings narrower, wider or about the same in 2015 as in 2005?

    Release date: 2022-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014361
    Description:

    In Canada, the selection of economic immigrants throughout the 1990s and 2000s was based largely on the human capital model of immigration. This model posits that selecting immigrants with high levels of human capital is particularly advantageous in the long run. It is argued that higher educational levels allow immigrants to both bring the skills needed in a "knowledge-based economy" and, perhaps more importantly, better adjust to both cyclical and structural changes in the labour market than immigrants with lower educational levels.

    This paper examines the trends in the earnings advantage that more highly educated immigrants hold over less educated immigrants by immigration class. The focus is on three questions. First, did the well-documented decline in entry earnings observed over the last quarter-century vary by immigrant educational level and by admission class? Second, have there been significant shifts across recent cohorts in the economic advantage that more highly educated immigrants hold over their less educated counterparts, both at entry and in the longer run? Third, and most importantly, does the relative earnings advantage of more highly educated immigrants change with time spent in Canada, that is, in the longer run?

    Release date: 2014-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013348
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study documents how hiring rates, separation rates, and worker reallocation rates evolved from the late 1970s to the late 2000s. It also examines how the pace of labour reallocation varied across industries, firm sizes, provinces, age groups, and education levels during the 2000s.

    Release date: 2013-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011339
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines how the risk of job loss and the short-term earnings losses of laid-off workers evolved between the late 1970s and the mid-2000s.

    Release date: 2011-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2009072
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This report provides new and unique empirical evidence on postsecondary education pathways in Atlantic Canada based on the data from the Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS). This study covers postsecondary students in public institutions at all levels of study - college, bachelor's, master's, Ph.D. and first professional degrees - with the emphasis on college and bachelor's students. The focus is on students who start new programs over the period of study, years 2001 through to 2004, and then observing who, in each year of their studies, graduates, continues in the same program, switches programs or leaves postsecondary education without graduating. The number of students who leave and then return to postsecondary studies and the number of students who graduate from a program and then continue in their studies are also identified. Students in this study can be tracked longitudinally as they move both within and across all institutions in the Atlantic.

    The research file used for this study was created by Statistics Canada using PSIS data from the Atlantic region. One of the key objectives of the PSIS is to provide information that will enable researchers to perform studies of student mobility, pathways and their relationship to education and labour market outcomes. PSIS is designed to hold a complete inventory of all Canadian postsecondary institutions and the programs and courses they offer, as well as demographic, program and course information for each student registered at these institutions. Atlantic Canada has participated in PSIS since the inception of PSIS and therefore was well positioned to take advantage of a longitudinal study using PSIS.

    The research file includes one longitudinal record for each postsecondary student who studied in Atlantic Canada at some point during the years 2001 through to 2004. The term "longitudinal" means that, as the student progresses through the postsecondary system, the PSIS record will provide a cumulative history of their postsecondary activity. It is the longitudinal nature of the database that allows for statistical studies of student mobility, pathways and their relationship to education and labour market outcomes. The research file contains 337,000 student records.

    Release date: 2009-02-12
Journals and periodicals (0)

Journals and periodicals (0) (0 results)

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