Parents, families and earnings

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Geography

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (21)

All (21) (0 to 10 of 21 results)

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100029
    Description:

    The economic lockdown to stop the spread of COVID-19 has led to steep declines in employment and hours worked for many Canadians. For workers in essential services, in jobs that can be done with proper physical distancing measures or in jobs that can be done from home, the likelihood of experiencing a work interruption during the pandemic is lower than for other workers. This article assesses how the feasibility of working from home varies across Canadian families. It also considers the implications of these differences for family earnings inequality.

    Release date: 2020-06-08

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202016024143
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2020-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017070
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents postsecondary enrolment rates among 19-year-olds over the 2001-to-2014 period by province of parental residence, parental income and sex. The data are drawn from the T1 Family File. Postsecondary enrolment is determined by the tuition, education and textbook credits on the personal income tax files. Parental income refers to the adult-equivalent, after-tax income of parents, expressed in 2014 constant dollars. Youth are grouped by parental income quintiles.

    Release date: 2017-04-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016381
    Description:

    Changes in health status may affect not just the individuals who experience such changes, but also their family members. For example, if the main earner in a family loses his or her ability to generate income due to a health shock, it invariably affects the financial situation of the spouse and other dependents. In addition, spouses and working-age children may themselves increase or reduce their labour supply to make up for the lost income (“added worker effect”) or care for a sick family member (“caregiver effect”). Since consumption smoothing and self-insurance occur at the household level, the financial effects of health for other family members have important policy implications. To shed light on such effects, this study analyzes how one spouse’s cancer diagnosis affects the employment and earnings of the other spouse and (before-tax) total family income using administrative data from Canada.

    Release date: 2016-07-22

  • Stats in brief: 11-630-X2016005
    Description:

    This edition of Canadian Megatrends looks at the rise of dual-earner family with children from 1976 to 2015.

    Release date: 2016-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200211697
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many parents take time off work to care for a child after birth or adoption. Whether or not parents take leave and the duration of that leave may be influenced by characteristics such as parental employment or child and maternal health factors.

    This article examines children's experiences of parent-reported leave after their birth or adoption. In addition, associations between leave and parent employment and child and maternal health factors are analyzed using data from the 2010 Survey of Young Canadians.

    Release date: 2012-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911013237
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1980 and 2005, parental work time increased by substantial margins, especially for families located at the bottom and in the middle of the earnings distribution. However, this increase occurred against a backdrop of a stronger increase in earnings for families at the top of the earnings distribution. This study finds that high earnings families earned more in 2005 than in 1980 for a given amount of parental work time, likely because of higher wages.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910813235
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Women's labour market participation has increased substantially over recent decades, creating challenges for families in balancing work-life responsibilities. The examination of family work patterns revealed significant differences in annual hours of work between families with and those without children.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910413228
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Although the average work week has been declining, overall family work hours have increased. In 2008, dual-earners accounted for three-quarters of all couples with dependent children, compared with just over one-third in 1976. Over the period, the combined paid work hours of couples increased from an average of 58 per week to 65.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810613211
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2001, shareable parental leave benefits under the federal Parental Benefits Program increased from 10 to 35 weeks, and in 2006 Quebec introduced its Parental Insurance Program. These changes led to a significant increase in the number of fathers claiming paid parental leave benefits. Between 2000 and 2006, the proportion of fathers claiming parental benefits jumped from 3% to 20%. The most common reasons for fathers not claiming the benefits were family choice, difficulty taking time off work and financial issues.

    Release date: 2008-09-24
Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Analysis (21)

Analysis (21) (0 to 10 of 21 results)

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100029
    Description:

    The economic lockdown to stop the spread of COVID-19 has led to steep declines in employment and hours worked for many Canadians. For workers in essential services, in jobs that can be done with proper physical distancing measures or in jobs that can be done from home, the likelihood of experiencing a work interruption during the pandemic is lower than for other workers. This article assesses how the feasibility of working from home varies across Canadian families. It also considers the implications of these differences for family earnings inequality.

    Release date: 2020-06-08

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202016024143
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2020-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017070
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents postsecondary enrolment rates among 19-year-olds over the 2001-to-2014 period by province of parental residence, parental income and sex. The data are drawn from the T1 Family File. Postsecondary enrolment is determined by the tuition, education and textbook credits on the personal income tax files. Parental income refers to the adult-equivalent, after-tax income of parents, expressed in 2014 constant dollars. Youth are grouped by parental income quintiles.

    Release date: 2017-04-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016381
    Description:

    Changes in health status may affect not just the individuals who experience such changes, but also their family members. For example, if the main earner in a family loses his or her ability to generate income due to a health shock, it invariably affects the financial situation of the spouse and other dependents. In addition, spouses and working-age children may themselves increase or reduce their labour supply to make up for the lost income (“added worker effect”) or care for a sick family member (“caregiver effect”). Since consumption smoothing and self-insurance occur at the household level, the financial effects of health for other family members have important policy implications. To shed light on such effects, this study analyzes how one spouse’s cancer diagnosis affects the employment and earnings of the other spouse and (before-tax) total family income using administrative data from Canada.

    Release date: 2016-07-22

  • Stats in brief: 11-630-X2016005
    Description:

    This edition of Canadian Megatrends looks at the rise of dual-earner family with children from 1976 to 2015.

    Release date: 2016-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200211697
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many parents take time off work to care for a child after birth or adoption. Whether or not parents take leave and the duration of that leave may be influenced by characteristics such as parental employment or child and maternal health factors.

    This article examines children's experiences of parent-reported leave after their birth or adoption. In addition, associations between leave and parent employment and child and maternal health factors are analyzed using data from the 2010 Survey of Young Canadians.

    Release date: 2012-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911013237
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1980 and 2005, parental work time increased by substantial margins, especially for families located at the bottom and in the middle of the earnings distribution. However, this increase occurred against a backdrop of a stronger increase in earnings for families at the top of the earnings distribution. This study finds that high earnings families earned more in 2005 than in 1980 for a given amount of parental work time, likely because of higher wages.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910813235
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Women's labour market participation has increased substantially over recent decades, creating challenges for families in balancing work-life responsibilities. The examination of family work patterns revealed significant differences in annual hours of work between families with and those without children.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910413228
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Although the average work week has been declining, overall family work hours have increased. In 2008, dual-earners accounted for three-quarters of all couples with dependent children, compared with just over one-third in 1976. Over the period, the combined paid work hours of couples increased from an average of 58 per week to 65.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810613211
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2001, shareable parental leave benefits under the federal Parental Benefits Program increased from 10 to 35 weeks, and in 2006 Quebec introduced its Parental Insurance Program. These changes led to a significant increase in the number of fathers claiming paid parental leave benefits. Between 2000 and 2006, the proportion of fathers claiming parental benefits jumped from 3% to 20%. The most common reasons for fathers not claiming the benefits were family choice, difficulty taking time off work and financial issues.

    Release date: 2008-09-24
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: