Intergenerational income mobility: The lasting effects of growing up in a lower-income family

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Release date: September 15, 2020
Infographic: Intergenerational income mobility: The lasting effects of growing up in a lower-income family
Description: Intergenerational income mobility: The lasting effects of growing up in a lower-income family

Intergenerational income mobility: The lasting effects of growing up in a lower-income family

New data from the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults on a cohort of Canadians born between 1963 and 1979Note 1 reveal differences in their life course, depending on whether they grew up in a lower or higher income family.Note 2


Table 1
Table summary
This table displays the results of Table 1. The information is grouped by Canadians who had lower family income as children... (appearing as row headers), Rate (appearing as column headers).
Canadians who had lower family income as children... Rate
were less likely to have parents with a university degreeTable 1 Note 3 14.0%
were more likely to have a non-official language as a mother tongue 9.6%
were less likely to live with both parents at age 15 71.9%
were less likely to have a university degree 25.3%
were less likely to be married or cohabitating as adults 62.0%
were more likely to report being in poor or fair health as adults 10.5%
had lower family income as adultsTable 1 Note 4 $48,600

Table 2
Table summary
This table displays the results of Table 2. The information is grouped by Canadians who had higher family income as children... (appearing as row headers), Rate (appearing as column headers).
Canadians who had higher family income as children... Rate
were more likely to have parents with a university degreeTable 2 Note 3 57.5%
were less likely to have a non-official language as a mother tongue 3.4%
were more likely to live with both parents at age 15 90.6%
were more likely to have a university degree 65.8%
were more likely to be married or cohabitating as adults 75.3%
were less likely to report being in poor or fair health as adults 5.4%
had higher family income as adultsTable 2 Note 4 $81,400

Source: Longitudinal and International Study of Adults, 2014.

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