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All (173)

All (173) (0 to 10 of 173 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019004
    Description: This paper uses Canadian business microdata for 1999 to 2013 to study the characteristics of private-sector medium-sized firms that transition to the large or small size classes. A firm’s size class is defined over a three-year window to ensure that it represents the firm’s long-term state rather than a transient state for a given year. The paper examines what distinguishes medium-sized firms that become large from those that revert to being small.
    Release date: 2019-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016384
    Description:

    In order to understand what drives aggregate fluctuations, many macroeconomic models point to aggregate shocks and discount the contribution of firm-specific shocks. Recent research from other developed countries, however, has found that aggregate fluctuations are in part driven by shocks to large firms. Using data on Canadian firms from the T2-LEAP database, which links financial statements from firms’ Corporate Income Tax Return with employment data from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program, this paper examines the contribution of large firms to industry-level fluctuations in gross output, investment and employment in the manufacturing sector.

    Release date: 2016-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2016004
    Description:

    Understanding the importance of the dynamic entry process in the Canadian economy involves measuring the amount and size of firm entry. The paper presents estimates of the importance of firm entry in Canada. It uses the database underlying the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program (LEAP), which has produced measures of firm entry and exit since 1988. This paper discusses the methodology used to estimate entry and exit, the issues that had to be resolved and the reasons for choosing the particular solutions that were adopted. It then presents measures that are derived from LEAP. Finally, it analyzes the sensitivity of the estimates associated with LEAP to alternative methods of estimating entry and exit.

    Release date: 2016-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014091
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses data from Statistics Canada's Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program database to study the distribution of annual employment growth rates in Canada over the 2000-to-2009 period, with a special emphasis on firms in the tails of the distribution, referred to here as High-Growth Firms (HGFs) and Rapidly Shrinking Firms (RSFs).

    The study has three objectives. First, it describes the distributions of employment growth rates in Canada to see whether they are consistent with observations in other countries. Second, it quantifies the contribution of HGFs and RSFs to aggregate job creation and destruction. The third objective is to examine, using quantile regression techniques, the role of firm size and firm age in the performance of HGFs and RSFs.

    Release date: 2014-05-15

  • Table: 63-259-X
    Description:

    This product provides an overview of trends in the consulting services industry. It provides users with information required for making corporate decisions, monitoring programs and reviewing policies. The tables focus on financial and operating data.

    Release date: 2014-03-12

  • Table: 63-256-X
    Description:

    This product provides an overview of trends in the accounting services industry. It provides users with information required for making corporate decisions, monitoring programs and reviewing policies. The tables focus on financial and operating data.

    Release date: 2014-02-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014088
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper compares the relative importance of small and large firms in the business sectors of Canada and the United States from 2002 to 2008 using estimates of the contribution of small and large firms to the gross domestic product (GDP) of each country. It then makes use of estimates of labour input for comparison purposes. In this paper, small firms are defined as those with fewer than 500 employees and large firms as those with 500 or more employees.

    Release date: 2014-01-08

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2014033
    Description:

    This paper examines and compares labour productivity in Canada and the United States for small and large firms over the period from 2002 to 2008. It quantifies the relative importance of small and large firms in Canada and the United States and measures the relative productivity levels of small versus large firms.

    Small firms are relatively more important in the Canadian economy. Small firms are less productive than large firms in both countries. But the productivity disadvantage of small relative to large firms was higher in Canada.

    The paper provides an estimate of the impact that these differences have on the gap in productivity levels between Canada and the United States. It first estimates the changes that would occur in Canadian aggregate labour productivity if the share of hours worked of large firms in Canada was increased to the U.S. level. It then quantifies the impact of increasing the relative productivity of small to large firms in Canada up to the relative productivity ratio of small firms to large firms that existed in the United States.

    Together, decreasing the relative importance of small firms in the economy and increasing their relative productivity compared to large firms accounts for most of the gap in productivity levels between Canada and the United States in 2002. However, changes in the economy that occurred between 2002 and 2008 reduced the contribution of the small-firm sector to the gap in productivity levels.

    Release date: 2014-01-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2013087
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The topic of firm size and performance continues to spark the interest of researchers and policy-makers. Small and medium-sized enterprises receive much of the attention, as they have the potential to grow significantly. However, compared with their larger counterparts, these firms are more likely to fail and are therefore riskier.

    Is risk important in explaining differences in profitability across firm size classes? This study uses a longitudinal firm-level dataset to examine determinants of profitability by firm size, with an emphasis on risk, or the volatility in rates of return. It builds on previous research that found firms with 10 to 20 employees tend to be the most profitable.

    Release date: 2013-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013348
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study documents how hiring rates, separation rates, and worker reallocation rates evolved from the late 1970s to the late 2000s. It also examines how the pace of labour reallocation varied across industries, firm sizes, provinces, age groups, and education levels during the 2000s.

    Release date: 2013-03-01
Data (8)

Data (8) ((8 results))

  • Table: 63-259-X
    Description:

    This product provides an overview of trends in the consulting services industry. It provides users with information required for making corporate decisions, monitoring programs and reviewing policies. The tables focus on financial and operating data.

    Release date: 2014-03-12

  • Table: 63-256-X
    Description:

    This product provides an overview of trends in the accounting services industry. It provides users with information required for making corporate decisions, monitoring programs and reviewing policies. The tables focus on financial and operating data.

    Release date: 2014-02-12

  • Table: 87F0008X
    Description:

    This product provides an overview of trends in the sound recording and music publishing industry. It provides users with information to monitor growth of the industry, measure performance, monitor programs and review policies. The tables focus on financial and operating data.

    Release date: 2013-01-30

  • Table: 65-506-X
    Description:

    This publication presents statistics, derived from the Exporter Registry, on exporting establishments for the years 1993 to 2005. This publication provides information on the number of exporters and the value of their domestic exports by industry, exporter size, destination and province of residence. In addition, it also carries employment statistics of exporting establishments for the year 2005.

    Release date: 2008-10-02

  • Table: 16F0008X
    Description:

    This report presents estimates of national and provincial economic activity of the environment industry in Canada, including the revenues earned from the production of environmental goods, the provision of environmental services and the undertaking of environment-related construction activities.

    The environment industry is composed of establishments operating in a variety of industries that produce environmental goods and services. Environmental goods and services are goods and services that are used, or can potentially be used to measure, prevent, limit or correct environmental damage (both natural or by human activity) to water, air, soil as well as problems related to waste, noise and ecosystems. They also include clean or resource-efficient (eco-efficient) technologies that decrease material inputs, reduce energy consumption, recover valuable by-products, reduce emissions and/or minimise waste disposal problems.

    Release date: 2007-09-24

  • Table: 61-534-X
    Description:

    This publication describes the evolution of the Canadian business environment in light of economic changes in Canada from 1991 to 2001. The publication shows business and employment dynamics in Canada during this period. It provides (1) statistics that show the direct impact of these changes on business creation (firm births) and business destruction (firm deaths); (2) the relative share and distribution of businesses and employment across various categories of firms (Size - small, medium and large size firms, Industry - low-knowledge, medium-knowledge and high-knowledge industries, as well as goods and services industries and by Geography-Province); and (3) it examines survival rates of newly created businesses (lifespan of new businesses).

    Release date: 2006-03-10

  • Table: 50-002-X20040047024
    Description:

    To provide data users with a more complete picture of the activies associated with the Couriers and Local Messengers industry.

    Release date: 2004-07-14

  • Table: 16F0003X
    Description:

    This report presents results of the Waste Management Industry Survey, 1995, which gathered information on the financial characteristics and waste management activities undertaken in the business sector.

    Release date: 1998-07-23
Analysis (162)

Analysis (162) (0 to 10 of 162 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019004
    Description: This paper uses Canadian business microdata for 1999 to 2013 to study the characteristics of private-sector medium-sized firms that transition to the large or small size classes. A firm’s size class is defined over a three-year window to ensure that it represents the firm’s long-term state rather than a transient state for a given year. The paper examines what distinguishes medium-sized firms that become large from those that revert to being small.
    Release date: 2019-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016384
    Description:

    In order to understand what drives aggregate fluctuations, many macroeconomic models point to aggregate shocks and discount the contribution of firm-specific shocks. Recent research from other developed countries, however, has found that aggregate fluctuations are in part driven by shocks to large firms. Using data on Canadian firms from the T2-LEAP database, which links financial statements from firms’ Corporate Income Tax Return with employment data from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program, this paper examines the contribution of large firms to industry-level fluctuations in gross output, investment and employment in the manufacturing sector.

    Release date: 2016-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2016004
    Description:

    Understanding the importance of the dynamic entry process in the Canadian economy involves measuring the amount and size of firm entry. The paper presents estimates of the importance of firm entry in Canada. It uses the database underlying the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program (LEAP), which has produced measures of firm entry and exit since 1988. This paper discusses the methodology used to estimate entry and exit, the issues that had to be resolved and the reasons for choosing the particular solutions that were adopted. It then presents measures that are derived from LEAP. Finally, it analyzes the sensitivity of the estimates associated with LEAP to alternative methods of estimating entry and exit.

    Release date: 2016-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014091
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses data from Statistics Canada's Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program database to study the distribution of annual employment growth rates in Canada over the 2000-to-2009 period, with a special emphasis on firms in the tails of the distribution, referred to here as High-Growth Firms (HGFs) and Rapidly Shrinking Firms (RSFs).

    The study has three objectives. First, it describes the distributions of employment growth rates in Canada to see whether they are consistent with observations in other countries. Second, it quantifies the contribution of HGFs and RSFs to aggregate job creation and destruction. The third objective is to examine, using quantile regression techniques, the role of firm size and firm age in the performance of HGFs and RSFs.

    Release date: 2014-05-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014088
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper compares the relative importance of small and large firms in the business sectors of Canada and the United States from 2002 to 2008 using estimates of the contribution of small and large firms to the gross domestic product (GDP) of each country. It then makes use of estimates of labour input for comparison purposes. In this paper, small firms are defined as those with fewer than 500 employees and large firms as those with 500 or more employees.

    Release date: 2014-01-08

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2014033
    Description:

    This paper examines and compares labour productivity in Canada and the United States for small and large firms over the period from 2002 to 2008. It quantifies the relative importance of small and large firms in Canada and the United States and measures the relative productivity levels of small versus large firms.

    Small firms are relatively more important in the Canadian economy. Small firms are less productive than large firms in both countries. But the productivity disadvantage of small relative to large firms was higher in Canada.

    The paper provides an estimate of the impact that these differences have on the gap in productivity levels between Canada and the United States. It first estimates the changes that would occur in Canadian aggregate labour productivity if the share of hours worked of large firms in Canada was increased to the U.S. level. It then quantifies the impact of increasing the relative productivity of small to large firms in Canada up to the relative productivity ratio of small firms to large firms that existed in the United States.

    Together, decreasing the relative importance of small firms in the economy and increasing their relative productivity compared to large firms accounts for most of the gap in productivity levels between Canada and the United States in 2002. However, changes in the economy that occurred between 2002 and 2008 reduced the contribution of the small-firm sector to the gap in productivity levels.

    Release date: 2014-01-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2013087
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The topic of firm size and performance continues to spark the interest of researchers and policy-makers. Small and medium-sized enterprises receive much of the attention, as they have the potential to grow significantly. However, compared with their larger counterparts, these firms are more likely to fail and are therefore riskier.

    Is risk important in explaining differences in profitability across firm size classes? This study uses a longitudinal firm-level dataset to examine determinants of profitability by firm size, with an emphasis on risk, or the volatility in rates of return. It builds on previous research that found firms with 10 to 20 employees tend to be the most profitable.

    Release date: 2013-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013348
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study documents how hiring rates, separation rates, and worker reallocation rates evolved from the late 1970s to the late 2000s. It also examines how the pace of labour reallocation varied across industries, firm sizes, provinces, age groups, and education levels during the 2000s.

    Release date: 2013-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012021
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series reports on the size distribution of Canadian firms compiled for the research paper Small, Medium-sized, and Large Businesses in the Canadian Economy: Measuring Their Contribution to Gross Domestic Product from 2001 to 2008. The creation of estimates of gross domestic product by firm size is part of a program at Statistics Canada that examines the structure of the Canadian economy and its evolution.

    Release date: 2012-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2012082
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper adds to our understanding of the contributions made to the economy by small, medium-sized, and large businesses in Canada. It does this by examining the shares of gross domestic product (GDP) produced by each of these size groups in the business sector.

    Previous studies relied predominately on employment, an input to the production process, rather than on a measure of output. This study overcomes this problem by focusing directly on GDP.

    Release date: 2012-12-07
Reference (3)

Reference (3) ((3 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 31-532-G
    Description:

    This practical and informative guide for manufacturers and exporters will assist in navigating through numerous Statistics Canada products and services. In addition, some recent articles and research papers have been highlighted.

    Release date: 2000-07-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1994008
    Description:

    This document describes the survey content for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) income data questionnaire and explains the interview process.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1995012
    Description:

    This paper describes the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) income data collection procedures and provides an overview of the interview process. May 1995 was the first year respondents could choose to carry out the interview as in the previous year, or they could grant permission for Statistics Canada to access their income tax returns from Revenue Canada and forego the interview.

    Release date: 1995-12-30
Date modified: