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All (38) (0 to 10 of 38 results)

  • Table: 91-002-X
    Description:

    This publication presents quarterly estimates of population for Canada, provinces and territories as well as statistics on the following components of population change: births, deaths, immigration, emigration, returning emigration, net temporary emigration, net non-permanent residents and interprovincial migration, the latter by origin and destination. The Quarterly Demographic Estimates publication contains the most recent estimates as well as a quarterly historical series. It also contains highlights and analysis of the most current demographic trends, as well as a brief description of the concepts, methods and data quality of the estimates.

    Release date: 2019-09-30

  • Table: 84-537-X
    Description:

    This electronic publication contains life tables comprising life expectancy and related estimates by age and sex for Canada, the provinces and territories. Detailed estimates (by single year of age) have been produced for Canada and all of the provinces, except Prince Edward Island. Abridged estimates (by five-year age group) have been produced for Prince Edward Island and the three territories separately.

    Release date: 2019-05-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 84-538-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This document presents the methodology underlying the production of the life tables for Canada, provinces and territories, from reference period 1980/1982 and onward.

    Release date: 2019-05-30

  • Table: 98-508-X
    Description:

    The Census Profile Standard Error Supplement provides the standard error for each long-form estimate along with the standard Census Profile data for a selected ADA, its corresponding census division (CD) and province/territory, as well as for Canada. It can be downloaded for selected areas or the entire profile in a variety of commonly used formats (e.g., CSV, TAB or IVT). This product will be updated with additional content released on November 29, 2017.

    Release date: 2018-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2016003
    Description:

    Periodically, income statistics are updated to reflect the most recent population estimates from the Census. Accordingly, with the release of the 2014 data from the Canadian Income Survey, Statistics Canada has revised estimates for 2006 to 2013 using new population totals from the 2011 Census. This paper provides unrevised estimates alongside revised estimates for key income series, indicating where the revisions were significant.

    Release date: 2016-07-08

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2015003
    Description:

    The infographic in question, entitled Population Estimates, Canada, 2015, provides a concise accurate snapshot of the most recent demographic trends in Canada, related to demographic growth and aging, at the national, provincial and territorial levels.

    Release date: 2015-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2012003
    Description:

    The release of the 2010 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) data coincided with a historical revision of the 2006 to 2009 results. The survey weights were updated to take into account new population estimates based on the 2006 Census rather than the 2001 Census. This paper presents a summary of the impact of this revision on the 2006-2009 survey estimates.

    Release date: 2012-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201200111682
    Description:

    Sample allocation issues are studied in the context of estimating sub-population (stratum or domain) means as well as the aggregate population mean under stratified simple random sampling. A non-linear programming method is used to obtain "optimal" sample allocation to strata that minimizes the total sample size subject to specified tolerances on the coefficient of variation of the estimators of strata means and the population mean. The resulting total sample size is then used to determine sample allocations for the methods of Costa, Satorra and Ventura (2004) based on compromise allocation and Longford (2006) based on specified "inferential priorities". In addition, we study sample allocation to strata when reliability requirements for domains, cutting across strata, are also specified. Performance of the three methods is studied using data from Statistics Canada's Monthly Retail Trade Survey (MRTS) of single establishments.

    Release date: 2012-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201000111247
    Description:

    In this paper, the problem of estimating the variance of various estimators of the population mean in two-phase sampling has been considered by jackknifing the two-phase calibrated weights of Hidiroglou and Särndal (1995, 1998). Several estimators of population mean available in the literature are shown to be the special cases of the technique developed here, including those suggested by Rao and Sitter (1995) and Sitter (1997). By following Raj (1965) and Srivenkataramana and Tracy (1989), some new estimators of the population mean are introduced and their variances are estimated through the proposed jackknife procedure. The variance of the chain ratio and regression type estimators due to Chand (1975) are also estimated using the jackknife. A simulation study is conducted to assess the efficiency of the proposed jackknife estimators relative to the usual estimators of variance.

    Release date: 2010-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900211036
    Description:

    Surveys are frequently required to produce estimates for subpopulations, sometimes for a single subpopulation and sometimes for several subpopulations in addition to the total population. When membership of a rare subpopulation (or domain) can be determined from the sampling frame, selecting the required domain sample size is relatively straightforward. In this case the main issue is the extent of oversampling to employ when survey estimates are required for several domains and for the total population. Sampling and oversampling rare domains whose members cannot be identified in advance present a major challenge. A variety of methods has been used in this situation. In addition to large-scale screening, these methods include disproportionate stratified sampling, two-phase sampling, the use of multiple frames, multiplicity sampling, panel surveys, and the use of multi-purpose surveys. This paper illustrates the application of these methods in a range of social surveys.

    Release date: 2009-12-23
Data (7)

Data (7) ((7 results))

  • Table: 91-002-X
    Description:

    This publication presents quarterly estimates of population for Canada, provinces and territories as well as statistics on the following components of population change: births, deaths, immigration, emigration, returning emigration, net temporary emigration, net non-permanent residents and interprovincial migration, the latter by origin and destination. The Quarterly Demographic Estimates publication contains the most recent estimates as well as a quarterly historical series. It also contains highlights and analysis of the most current demographic trends, as well as a brief description of the concepts, methods and data quality of the estimates.

    Release date: 2019-09-30

  • Table: 84-537-X
    Description:

    This electronic publication contains life tables comprising life expectancy and related estimates by age and sex for Canada, the provinces and territories. Detailed estimates (by single year of age) have been produced for Canada and all of the provinces, except Prince Edward Island. Abridged estimates (by five-year age group) have been produced for Prince Edward Island and the three territories separately.

    Release date: 2019-05-30

  • Table: 98-508-X
    Description:

    The Census Profile Standard Error Supplement provides the standard error for each long-form estimate along with the standard Census Profile data for a selected ADA, its corresponding census division (CD) and province/territory, as well as for Canada. It can be downloaded for selected areas or the entire profile in a variety of commonly used formats (e.g., CSV, TAB or IVT). This product will be updated with additional content released on November 29, 2017.

    Release date: 2018-01-19

  • Table: 91-213-X
    Description:

    This publication contains population estimates by age and sex for Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions, census metropolitan areas and economic regions. It also includes, for provinces and territories, estimates by age, sex and marital status as well as estimates for census families.

    The estimates are based on the 2001 Census results, which have been adjusted for net census undercoverage. The publication also includes statistics for the demographic components that were used to produce the population estimates (births, deaths, marriages, divorces, immigration, emigration, net temporary emigration, returning emigration, internal migration and non-permanent residents) by age and sex. In addition, the publication contains highlights of current demographic trends and a description of the methodology.

    The print version of the publication includes a CD-ROM that provides additional data such as a chronological series of estimates by various levels of geography. With regard to provinces and territories, the estimates date back to 1971 (tables and animated age pyramid), 1986 for census divisions, census metropolitan areas and economic regions as well as census families.

    The time series available on the CD-ROM can be easily captured and manipulated by analysts who want to create customized demographic analyses in any spreadsheet program. The population figures can be used, for example, to calculate per-capita rates required for market research, quantitative analysis and planning.

    Release date: 2006-04-04

  • Table: 85-226-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This publication presents data on young offender admissions to custody and community services, with breakdowns by custody (remand, secure, open) and probation, and key case characteristics, such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal status and most serious offence. In addition, it includes data pertaining to releases from remand, secure custody and open custody, by sex and time served. These breakdowns are presented at the national and provincial/territorial levels.

    Data presented in this publication are drawn from two primary sources: 1) The Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey. The objective of this survey is to collect and analyse information on the application of dispositions under the Young Offenders Act from provincial and territorial agencies responsible for youth corrections and programs. 2) The Youth Key Indicator Report (YKIR). This survey measures the average counts of youth in custody (remand, secure and open) and on probation. The YKIR describes average daily counts (caseload), which measure the volume of offenders held in custody or on probation on an average day at month-end. This information also provides an examination of youth incarceration and probation rates in Canada.

    Release date: 2002-10-09

  • Table: 93F0051X
    Description:

    These tables provide population and dwelling counts established by the 2001 Census of Canada. The following levels of geography are covered: Canada, provinces, territories, and other geographic areas including census subdivisions (municipalities), census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations.

    For selected geographies, the tables provide percentage change in the population counts between 1996 and 2001. Data are also provided for land area and population density. Various tables allow the data in a column to be sorted in descending or ascending order. Geographic boundaries are those in effect on January 1, 2001.

    An interactive reference-mapping tool, called GeoSearch, is available on the Statistics Canada website for identifying places and geographic units presented in these tables.

    Release date: 2002-06-27

  • 7. Births and Deaths Archived
    Table: 84-210-X
    Description:

    The statistical tables in the first part of this document relate to the numbers and rates of live births and stillbirths of at least twenty weeks gestation; total, general and age specific fertility rates; live births by age of mother and order of live birth; male and female birth weights by age of mother and gestation period at the time of birth; and live births by census division and counties in the province(s).

    In the second part of this document, the statistical tables, for Canada, the ten provinces and the two territories, relate to the numbers and rates of deaths by marital status, age and sex; infant, neonatal, postnatal and perinatal deaths; maternal deaths; and stillbirths of at least twenty weeks gestation at the time of birth.

    Release date: 1997-05-15
Analysis (25)

Analysis (25) (0 to 10 of 25 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2016003
    Description:

    Periodically, income statistics are updated to reflect the most recent population estimates from the Census. Accordingly, with the release of the 2014 data from the Canadian Income Survey, Statistics Canada has revised estimates for 2006 to 2013 using new population totals from the 2011 Census. This paper provides unrevised estimates alongside revised estimates for key income series, indicating where the revisions were significant.

    Release date: 2016-07-08

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2015003
    Description:

    The infographic in question, entitled Population Estimates, Canada, 2015, provides a concise accurate snapshot of the most recent demographic trends in Canada, related to demographic growth and aging, at the national, provincial and territorial levels.

    Release date: 2015-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2012003
    Description:

    The release of the 2010 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) data coincided with a historical revision of the 2006 to 2009 results. The survey weights were updated to take into account new population estimates based on the 2006 Census rather than the 2001 Census. This paper presents a summary of the impact of this revision on the 2006-2009 survey estimates.

    Release date: 2012-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201200111682
    Description:

    Sample allocation issues are studied in the context of estimating sub-population (stratum or domain) means as well as the aggregate population mean under stratified simple random sampling. A non-linear programming method is used to obtain "optimal" sample allocation to strata that minimizes the total sample size subject to specified tolerances on the coefficient of variation of the estimators of strata means and the population mean. The resulting total sample size is then used to determine sample allocations for the methods of Costa, Satorra and Ventura (2004) based on compromise allocation and Longford (2006) based on specified "inferential priorities". In addition, we study sample allocation to strata when reliability requirements for domains, cutting across strata, are also specified. Performance of the three methods is studied using data from Statistics Canada's Monthly Retail Trade Survey (MRTS) of single establishments.

    Release date: 2012-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201000111247
    Description:

    In this paper, the problem of estimating the variance of various estimators of the population mean in two-phase sampling has been considered by jackknifing the two-phase calibrated weights of Hidiroglou and Särndal (1995, 1998). Several estimators of population mean available in the literature are shown to be the special cases of the technique developed here, including those suggested by Rao and Sitter (1995) and Sitter (1997). By following Raj (1965) and Srivenkataramana and Tracy (1989), some new estimators of the population mean are introduced and their variances are estimated through the proposed jackknife procedure. The variance of the chain ratio and regression type estimators due to Chand (1975) are also estimated using the jackknife. A simulation study is conducted to assess the efficiency of the proposed jackknife estimators relative to the usual estimators of variance.

    Release date: 2010-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900211036
    Description:

    Surveys are frequently required to produce estimates for subpopulations, sometimes for a single subpopulation and sometimes for several subpopulations in addition to the total population. When membership of a rare subpopulation (or domain) can be determined from the sampling frame, selecting the required domain sample size is relatively straightforward. In this case the main issue is the extent of oversampling to employ when survey estimates are required for several domains and for the total population. Sampling and oversampling rare domains whose members cannot be identified in advance present a major challenge. A variety of methods has been used in this situation. In addition to large-scale screening, these methods include disproportionate stratified sampling, two-phase sampling, the use of multiple frames, multiplicity sampling, panel surveys, and the use of multi-purpose surveys. This paper illustrates the application of these methods in a range of social surveys.

    Release date: 2009-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M2007008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    If low fertility, aging, demographic growth and ethnocultural diversity are phenomena that accurately describe Canada overall, the same patterns may not necessarily hold true for urban and rural areas. The rhythm and sources of demographic growth have often been significantly different from one area to the next, which would suggest that the situation across Canada stems from the aggregation of different demographies, which are variable between types of regions.

    The objective of this study is to examine demographic differences between urban and rural areas in Canada by analyzing communities along a gradient ranging from the largest metropolitan regions to the most rural areas. Applying a geographic structure to Census data from 1971 to 2001 that maintains constant borders over time, the authors analyze population growth across eight types of urban and rural regions; as well as the contribution of immigration, fertility and internal migration to growth differentials; and the consequences of these observed demographic differences in terms of aging and ethnocultural diversity.

    The study finds that growth is concentrated in the most metropolitan areas in the country and in the rural areas on which they have a strong influence, and diminished as the degree of rurality increases. Internal migration between the different types of areas has largely contributed to this differential growth: the most urbanized areas-with the exception of Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver-underwent significant migratory gains as well as strong growth. This was also the case with the rural regions that had a strong metropolitan influence. The most rural regions experienced a weak demographic growth, in some cases a decline, despite having higher fertility than other regions. The strong growth in the three largest urban areas in Canada-Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver-is largely attributed to the high numbers of international immigrants who decided to settle there. The concentration of newcomers in these regions helped increase the gap between these three areas and the rest of the country in terms of ethnocultural diversity.

    Release date: 2007-04-26

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2007008
    Description:

    This study is the third in a series related to the project launched in fall 2003 by the Canadian Productivity Accounts of Statistics Canada in order to compare productivity levels between Canada and the United States. The study's purpose is to examine the comparability of the components of the labour market of these two countries that serve as the sources of the differences in the gross domestic product (GDP) per capita between them. This study can be subdivided into three sections. The first section develops and illustrates the conceptual and methodological framework required to make Canada/United States estimates of labour and population comparable in terms of level. The second section presents revisions and an update to 2005 of the GDP per capita differences and its components, which were presented for the first time in the study by Baldwin, Maynard and Wong (2005), which covered the period from 1994 to 2002, at the time.

    Lastly, using the year 2000 as an example, this study tries to quantify the "statistical error" that arises from using inadequate statistics or statistics not designed for this type of international comparison. This exercise reveals that the comparability of data on hours worked per job is especially crucial to identifying the origin of the differences in GDP per capita between labour productivity and hours worked per capita. The worst error involves comparing hours worked estimated from an employer survey with those obtained from a household survey. This type of comparison between Canada and the United States results in assigning an estimated 72% of the difference in GDP per capita to labour productivity when, in reality, it counted for barely 36% in 2000.

    Release date: 2007-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20040027758
    Description:

    In this article, we study the use of Bayesian neural networks in finite population estimation.We propose estimators for finite population mean and the associated mean squared error. We also propose to use the student t-distribution to model the disturbances in order to accommodate extreme observations that are often present in the data from social sample surveys. Numerical results show that Bayesian neural networks have made a significant improvement in finite population estimation over linear regression based methods

    Release date: 2005-02-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20030017600
    Description:

    This paper extends the Sen-Yates-Grundy (SYG) variance estimators two-phase sampling designs with stratification at the second phase or both phases. It also develops SYG-type variance estimators of the two-phase regression estimators that make use of the first phase auxiliary data.

    Release date: 2005-01-26
Reference (10)

Reference (10) ((10 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 84-538-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This document presents the methodology underlying the production of the life tables for Canada, provinces and territories, from reference period 1980/1982 and onward.

    Release date: 2019-05-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71F0031X2006003
    Description:

    This paper introduces and explains modifications made to the Labour Force Survey estimates in January 2006. Some of these modifications include changes to the population estimates, improvements to the public and private sector estimates and historical updates to several small Census Agglomerations (CA).

    Release date: 2006-01-25

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0010X
    Description:

    The publication guides the user through the vast array of labour market and income data sources. It offers detailed descriptions of the various surveys, including the data collected. A summary chart gives snapshot information for comparisons.

    Release date: 2000-09-13

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X20000015177
    Description:

    The 1996 Canadian Census is adjusted for coverage error as estimated primarily through the Reverse Record Check (RRC). In this paper, we will show how there is a wealth of additional information from the 1996 Reverse Record Check of direct value to population estimation. Beyond its ability to estimate coverage error, it is possible to extend the Reverse Record Check classification results to obtain an alternative estimate of demographic growth - potentially decomposed by component. This added feature of the Reverse Record Check provides promise in the evaluation of estimated census coverage error as well as insight as to possible problems in the estimation of selected components in the population estimates program.

    Release date: 2000-08-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X19990015682
    Description:

    The application of dual system estimation (DSE) to matched Census / Post Enumeration Survey (PES) data in order to measure net undercount is well understood (Hogan, 1993). However, this approach has so far not been used to measure net undercount in the UK. The 2001 PES in the UK will use this methodology. This paper presents the general approach to design and estimation for this PES (the 2001 Census Coverage Survey). The estimation combines DSE with standard ratio and regression estimation. A simulation study using census data from the 1991 Census of England and Wales demonstrates that the ratio model is in general more robust than the regression model.

    Release date: 2000-03-02

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-370-X
    Description:

    Series description

    This series includes five general reference products - the Preview of Products and Services; the Catalogue; the Dictionary; the Handbook and the Technical Reports - as well as geography reference products - GeoSuite and Reference Maps.

    Product description

    Technical Reports examine the quality of data from the 1996 Census, a large and complex undertaking. While considerable effort was taken to ensure high quality standards throughout each step, the results are subject to a certain degree of error. Each report looks at the collection and processing operations and presents results from data evaluation, as well as notes on historical comparability.

    Technical Reports are aimed at moderate and sophisticated users but are written in a manner which could make them useful to all census data users. Most of the technical reports have been cancelled, with the exception of Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Status, Coverage and Sampling and Weighting. These reports will be available as bilingual publications as well as being available in both official languages on the Internet as free products.

    This report deals with coverage errors, which occured when persons, households, dwellings or families were missed by the 1996 Census or enumerated in error. Coverage errors are one of the most important types of error since they affect not only the accuracy of the counts of the various census universes but also the accuracy of all of the census data describing the characteristics of these universes. With this information, users can determine the risks involved in basing conclusions or decisions on census data.

    Release date: 1999-12-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980013906
    Description:

    In sample surveys, the units contained in the sampling frame ideally have a one-to-one correspondence with the elements in the target population under study. In many cases, however, the frame has a many-to-many structure. That is, a unit in the frame may be associated with multiple target population elements and a target population element may be associated with multiple frame units. Such was the case in a building characteristics survey in which the frame was a list of street addresses, but the target population was commercial buildings. The frame was messy because a street address corresponded either to a single building, multiple buildings, or part of a building. In this paper, we develop estimators and formulas for their variances in both simple and stratified random sampling designs when the frame has a many-to-many structure.

    Release date: 1998-07-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980013911
    Description:

    This paper examines the main properties of the generalized regression estimator of a finite population mean and those of the regression estimator obtained from the optimal difference estimator. Given that the latter can be more efficient than the former, conditions allowing this to happen are established, and a criterion for choosing between the two types of regression estimators follows. A simulation study illustrates their finite sample performances.

    Release date: 1998-07-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980013912
    Description:

    Efficient estimates of population size and totals based on information from multiple list frames and an independent area frame are considered. This work is an extension of the methodology proposed by Harley (1962) which considers two general frames. A main disadvantage of list frames is that they are typically incomplete. In this paper, we propose several methods to address frame deficiencies. A joint list-area sampling design incorporates multiple frames and achieves full coverage of the target population. For each combination of frames, we present the appropriate notation, likelihood function, and parameter estimators. Results from a simulation study that compares the various properties of the proposed estimators are also presented.

    Release date: 1998-07-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19970023620
    Description:

    Since France has no population registers, population censuses are the basis for its socio-demographic information system. However, between two censuses, some data must be updated, in particular at a high level of geographic detail, especially since censuses are tending, for various reasons, to be less frequent. In 1993, the Institut National de la Statistique et des Études Économiques (INSEE) set up a team whose objective was to propose a system to substantially improve the existing mechanism for making small area population estimates. Its task was twofold: to prepare an efficient and robust synthesis of the information available from different administrative sources, and to assemble a sufficient number of "good" sources. The "multi-source" system that it designed, which is reported on here, is flexible and reliable, without being overly complex.

    Release date: 1998-03-12
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